Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 177
Filter
1.
Med Teach ; 44(2): 187-195, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730379

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a major disruption to undergraduate and postgraduate clinical medical education. The aim of this rapid review was to identify and synthesize published literature relating to the solutions, enablers and barriers to online learning implemented in clinical medical education during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All articles published before March 2021 in peer-reviewed journals, including MedEdPublish, that described authors' experience of online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive analysis of the solutions and a qualitative template analysis of enablers and barriers. RESULTS: 87 articles were identified for inclusion. Face to face teaching was maintained with interactive approaches between learners and/or learners and teachers. Several innovative solutions were identified. The enablers were a readiness and rapid response by institutions, with innovation by teachers. The barriers were the lack of planning and resources, usability problems and limited interactivity between teachers and students. CONCLUSIONS: Important and timely evidence was obtained that can inform future policy, practice and research. The findings highlighted the urgent need to use rapid design and implementation methods with greater explicit descriptions in published articles to ensure applicability to other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Chest ; 159(5): 1949-1960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664763

ABSTRACT

All aspects of medical education were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several challenges were experienced by trainees and programs alike, including economic repercussions of the pandemic; social distancing affecting the delivery of medical education, testing, and interviewing; the surge of patients affecting redeployment of personnel and potential compromises in core training; and the overall impact on the wellness and mental health of trainees and educators. The ability of medical teams and researchers to peer review, conduct clinical research, and keep up with literature was similarly challenged by the rapid growth in peer-reviewed and preprint literature. This article reviews these challenges and shares strategies that institutions, educators, and learners adopted, adapted, and developed to provide quality education during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 291-298, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593500

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, patients with pneumonia of unknown etiology appeared in the city of Wuhan (China). After a short time, this infection affected not only the people of China but also the whole world. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the disease a pandemic. A viral agent was identified - severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease itself was named "2019 novel coronavirus infection" (COVID-19). Telemedicine technologies are a form of medical care and training that can counteract the spread of a COVID-19 epidemic by eliminating direct contact of both medical workers with patients and medical workers and patients with each other. Lack of personal protective equipment, the suspension of clinical clerkship and supervision, and a reduction in the number of elective surgical cases inevitably affect medical and surgical education. Interesting solutions using virtual learning, video conferencing, social media, and telemedicine could effectively address the sudden discontinuation of medical education. In fact, it is currently the ideal combination of teleworking and study. Telemedicine can play an important role in this pandemic by minimizing the spread of the virus, leveraging healthcare providers' time, and alleviating the challenges of medical education. The aim of this study was to identify the role of telemedicine services in the management and controlling of diseases as well as on medical education during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
4.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1854066, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574662

ABSTRACT

Universities worldwide are pausing in an attempt to contain COVID-19's spread. In February 2019, universities in China took the lead, cancelling all in-person classes and switching to virtual classrooms, with a wave of other institutes globally following suit. The shift to online platform poses serious challenges to medical education so that understanding best practices shared by pilot institutes may help medical educators improve teaching. Provide 12 tips to highlight strategies intended to help on-site medical classes moving completely online under the pandemic. We collected 'best practices' reports from 40 medical schools in China that were submitted to the National Centre for Health Professions Education Development. Experts' review-to-summary cycle was used to finalize the best practices in teaching medical students online that can benefit peer institutions most, under the unprecedented circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak. The 12 tips presented offer-specific strategies to optimize teaching medical students online under COVID-19, specifically highlighting the tech-based pedagogy, counselling, motivation, and ethics, as well as the assessment and modification. Learning experiences shared by pilot medical schools and customized properly are instructive to ensure a successful transition to e-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , China , Faculty, Medical/education , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development/organization & administration , Teaching
5.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 687-695, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511960

ABSTRACT

Trainees represent the medical practice of tomorrow. Interactions and collaborations at the early stage in career will strengthen the future of our specialties, clinical microbiology and infectious diseases. Trainee networks at the national level help access the best education and career opportunities. The aim of this collaborative white paper between the Trainee Association of European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and four national trainee networks is to discuss the motivation for building such networks and offer guidance for their creation and sustainability even during a health crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Microbiology/education , Humans
7.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(11): 1350-1354, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485407

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The main focus of education in most pathology residency and subspecialty pathology fellowships is the light microscopic examination of pathology specimens. Classes with multiheaded scopes are the most popular among pathology trainees. Until recently, it was difficult to imagine that this educational approach could change. In the beginning of March 2020, our country faced a serious challenge, which all of us now know as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The rules of social distancing and work from home were applied. These types of restrictions were implemented in almost all parts of our life, including work and pathology education. OBJECTIVE.­: To share our experience in the Department of Hematopathology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe our experience in modifying our approaches to education. We show how we overcame many obstacles to learning by building one of the largest virtual hematopathology educational platforms via Cisco WebEx and using social media, in particular Twitter. These tools facilitated the learning of hematopathology by medical students, pathology trainees, and practicing pathologists from all over the world. DATA SOURCES.­: During the first 3 months of the pandemic (April, May, and June, 2020), we evaluated the visitor attendance to the MD Anderson Cancer Center Hematopathology Virtual Educational Platform using data collected by the Cisco WebEx Web site. To determine the impact that the platform had on medical education for the hematopathology community on Twitter, the analytic metrics obtained from Symplur LLC (www.symplur.com, April 27, 2020) were used via its Symplur Signals program. CONCLUSIONS.­: Our experience using the MD Anderson Hematopathology Virtual Platform showed that there is substantial global interest and desire for virtual hematopathology education, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Hematology/education , Pathology/education , Social Media , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Texas
8.
Med Teach ; 44(2): 187-195, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450319

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a major disruption to undergraduate and postgraduate clinical medical education. The aim of this rapid review was to identify and synthesize published literature relating to the solutions, enablers and barriers to online learning implemented in clinical medical education during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All articles published before March 2021 in peer-reviewed journals, including MedEdPublish, that described authors' experience of online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive analysis of the solutions and a qualitative template analysis of enablers and barriers. RESULTS: 87 articles were identified for inclusion. Face to face teaching was maintained with interactive approaches between learners and/or learners and teachers. Several innovative solutions were identified. The enablers were a readiness and rapid response by institutions, with innovation by teachers. The barriers were the lack of planning and resources, usability problems and limited interactivity between teachers and students. CONCLUSIONS: Important and timely evidence was obtained that can inform future policy, practice and research. The findings highlighted the urgent need to use rapid design and implementation methods with greater explicit descriptions in published articles to ensure applicability to other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
9.
J Health Soc Behav ; 62(3): 255-270, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409985

ABSTRACT

From 1940 to 1980, studies of medical education were foundational to sociology, but attention shifted away from medical training in the late 1980s. Recently, there has been a marked return to this once pivotal topic, reflecting new questions and stakes. This article traces this resurgence by reviewing recent substantive research trends and setting the agenda for future research. We summarize four current research foci that reflect and critically map onto earlier projects in this subfield while driving theoretical development elsewhere in the larger discipline: (1) professional socialization, (2) knowledge regimes, (3) stratification within the profession, and (4) sociology of the field of medical education. We then offer six potential future directions where more research is needed: (1) inequalities in medical education, (2) socialization across the life course and new institutional forms of gatekeeping, (3) provider well-being, (4) globalization, (5) medical education as knowledge-based work, and (6) effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Sociology , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Forecasting , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Models, Educational , Professionalism , Racism , Sexism , Socioeconomic Factors , Sociology/history , Sociology/methods , Sociology/trends
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc101, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389117

ABSTRACT

The two-week block rotation in paediatrics (tenth semester) took place for 62 students purely as online teaching in the summer semester of 2020, at the time of the initial restrictions. As a teaching module, virtual patient presentations including debriefing took place as synchronous teaching. Patients and one parent were broadcast from the wards and outpatient clinics via video conference. Students were able to interact in small groups with 15-22 patients or their parents, respectively, via a doctor and both conduct the case history interview and brief the examination steps. Despite the limitation of not being able to perform the clinical examination themselves, participants rated the block rotation with good marks. They particularly appreciated the ability to interact with the children online as an indispensable compromise in times of suspended classroom teaching during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Pediatrics/education , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc82, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389115

ABSTRACT

Objective: The AIXTRA Competence Center for Training and Patient Safety at RWTH Aachen University has developed a concept to enable learning of communication skills with simulated persons (SP) digitally. Methodology: Existing SP cases in curricular teaching were checked for digital applicability and modified. Digital seminars with the methodology of simulated conversations with SP, for planned 690 students for the courses "history taking", 6th semester, conversations in psychiatry, 8th semester, and in the clinical competence course, 10th semester, were conducted via video conferencing software. The structure is similar to SP-seminars in classroom teaching with a case presentation, a doctor/patient dialogue and a feedback session. In the 6th and 10th semester, the seminars were evaluated anonymously by the students using an online questionnaire. SP were asked by e-mail for their assessment. The lecturers were asked about their experience with the digital seminars by means of qualitative interviews. Results: The survey of students with 92 completed questionnaires indicates a high level of acceptance. Digital teaching with SP was rated "very good" by 63% of the students and "good" by 37% as an overall mark for the course. The digital implementation is well practicable, the retention and accessibility of all learning goals is rated as given. Conclusion: Digital teaching with SP can be well realized with appropriate preparation. Specific aspects of digital implementation (e.g. role and data protection) must be taken into account. The differentiated evaluation of the surveys will bring further results and deductive questions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Patient Simulation , Social Skills , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Acad Med ; 95(11): 1631-1633, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373678

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has disrupted every aspect of the U.S. health care and health professions education systems, creating anxiety, suffering, and chaos and exposing many of the flaws in the nation's public health, medical education, and political systems. The pandemic has starkly revealed the need for a better public health infrastructure and a health system with incentives for population health and prevention of disease as well as outstanding personalized curative health. It has also provided opportunities for innovations in health care and has inspired courageous actions of residents, who have responded to the needs of their patients despite risk to themselves. In this Invited Commentary, the author shares lessons he learned from 3 earlier disasters and discusses needed changes in medical education, health care, and health policy that the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed. He encourages health professions educators to use the experiences of this pandemic to reexamine the current curricular emphasis on the bioscientific model of health and to broaden the educational approach to incorporate the behavioral, social, and environmental factors that influence health. Surveillance for disease, investment in disease and injury prevention, and disaster planning should be basic elements of health professions education. Incorporating innovations such as telemedicine, used under duress during the pandemic, could alter educational and clinical approaches to create something better for students, residents, and patients. He explains that journals such as Academic Medicine can provide rapid, curated, expert advice that can be an important counterweight to the misinformation that circulates during disasters. Such journals can also inform their readers about new training in skills needed to mitigate the ongoing effects of the disaster and prepare the workforce for future disasters.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Health/education , Public Health/trends , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
15.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1276-1281, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371750

ABSTRACT

The clinical learning environment (CLE) encompasses the learner's personal characteristics and experiences, social relationships, organizational culture, and the institution's physical and virtual infrastructure. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all 4 of these parts of the CLE have undergone a massive and rapid disruption. Personal and social communications have been limited to virtual interactions or shifted to unfamiliar clinical spaces because of redeployment. Rapid changes to the organizational culture required prompt adaptations from learners and educators in their complex organizational systems yet caused increased confusion and anxiety among them. A traditional reliance on a physical infrastructure for classical educational practices in the CLE was challenged when all institutions had to undergo a major transition to a virtual learning environment. However, disruptions spurred exciting innovations in the CLE. An entire cohort of physicians and learners underwent swift adjustments in their personal and professional development and identity as they rose to meet the clinical and educational challenges they faced due to COVID-19. Social networks and collaborations were expanded beyond traditional institutional walls and previously held international boundaries within multiple specialties. Specific aspects of the organizational and educational culture, including epidemiology, public health, and medical ethics, were brought to the forefront in health professions education, while the physical learning environment underwent a rapid transition to a virtual learning space. As health professions education continues in the era of COVID-19 and into a new era, educators must take advantage of these dynamic systems to identify additional gaps and implement meaningful change. In this article, health professions educators and learners from multiple institutions and specialties discuss the gaps and weaknesses exposed, opportunities revealed, and strategies developed for optimizing the CLE in the post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Learning , Physical Distancing , Students, Medical/psychology , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Interdisciplinary Placement , Organizational Culture , Social Environment , Social Networking , United States
16.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ ; 49(6): 848-852, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1353437

ABSTRACT

Molecular biology is an important course for medical postgraduates to understand the practice of modern molecular medicine. At present, molecular biology has been widely used in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of clinical medicine. The COVID-19 pandemic forced all universities suspending academic activities and online teaching all over the world, which is a kind of crisis and has become people's memory of the times. The efforts from all sectors of society, include government, research institutions, and enterprises, have gave medical students a profound impact. The integration of memory of the times into molecular biology teaching will enhance students' learning interest and understanding effect.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/organization & administration , Molecular Biology/education , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , China , Genes, Viral , Humans
17.
Am J Emerg Med ; 50: 80-84, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326900

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to compare the effect of synchronous online and face-to-face cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training on chest compressions quality in a manikin model. METHODS: A total of 118 fourth-year medical students participated in this study. The participants were divided into two groups: the online synchronous teaching group and the face-to-face group. Then, the participants were further randomly distributed to 1 of 2 feedback groups: online synchronous teaching and training with feedback devices (TF, n = 30) or without feedback devices (TN, n = 29) and face-to-face teaching and training with feedback devices (FF, n = 30) or without feedback devices (FN, n = 29). In the FN group and FF group, instructors delivered a 45-min CPR training program and gave feedback and guidance during training on site. In the TN group and TF group, the participants were trained with an online lecture via Tencent Meeting live broadcasting. Finally, participants performed a 2-min continuous chest compression (CC) during a simulated cardiopulmonary arrest scene without the audiovisual feedback (AVF) device. The outcome measures included CC depth, CC rate, proportions of appropriate depth (50-60 mm) and CC rate (100-120/min), percentage of correct hand location position, and percentage of complete chest recoil. RESULTS: There was little difference in the CC quality between the synchronous online training groups and the face-to-face training groups. There was no statistically significant difference in CC quality between the TN group and FN group. There were also no statistically significant differences between the TF and FF groups in terms of correct hand position, CC depth, appropriate CC depth, complete chest recoil or CC rate. However, the FF group had a higher appropriate CC rate than the TF group (p = 0.045). In the face-to-face training groups, the AVF device group had a significantly greater CC depth, appropriate CC depth, CC rate, and appropriate CC rate. However, there was a lack of statistically significant differences in terms of correct hand position (p = 0.191) and appropriate CC depth (p = 0.123). In the synchronous online training groups, the AVF device had little effect on the CC rate (p = 0.851) and increased the appropriate CC rate, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.178). CONCLUSIONS: Synchronous online training with an AVF device would be a potential alternative approach to face-to-face chest compression training. Synchronous online training with AVF devices seems to be a suitable replacement for face-to-face training to offer adequate bystander CPR chest compression training.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Heart Arrest/therapy , Manikins , Simulation Training , China , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Young Adult
18.
Am J Surg ; 223(2): 395-403, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The time course and longitudinal impact of the COVID -19 pandemic on surgical education(SE) and learner well-being (LWB)is unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Check-in surveys were distributed to Surgery Program Directors and Department Chairs, including general surgery and surgical specialties, in the summer and winter of 2020 and compared to a survey from spring 2020. Statistical associations for items with self-reported ACGME Stage and the survey period were assessed using categorical analysis. RESULTS: Stage 3 institutions were reported in spring (30%), summer (4%) [p < 0.0001] and increased in the winter (18%). Severe disruption (SD) was stage dependent (Stage 3; 45% (83/184) vs. Stages 1 and 2; 26% (206/801)[p < 0.0001]). This lessened in the winter (23%) vs. spring (32%) p = 0.02. LWB severe disruption was similar in spring 27%, summer 22%, winter 25% and was associated with Stage 3. CONCLUSIONS: Steps taken during the pandemic reduced SD but did not improve LWB. Systemic efforts are needed to protect learners and combat isolation pervasive in a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Humans , Learning , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
20.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1574-1579, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310945

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique set of challenges to medical education globally. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have faced unique barriers in transitioning to virtual modalities, and many medical students in LMICs experienced dramatically reduced educational time. The authors created the Global Medical Education Collaborative (GMEC) to address this problem by providing free, online, case-based tutorials to medical students in LMICs during the pandemic. APPROACH: The authors developed a needs assessment to gauge students' educational requirements, which informed GMEC's 2 primary goals: to provide free access to interactive online tutorials for students in LMICs and to bridge the physical distance between educators and learners via an online platform. A pilot program in Nigeria (April 26-May 26, 2020) helped inform the current strategy and logistics. Tutors and students were recruited via social media and medical education networks at the authors' home institutions. OUTCOMES: Within the first 2 months (April 26-June 26, 2020), 324 students representing 12 countries and 20+ medical schools joined GMEC. Additionally, 95 physicians and trainees joined as tutors and, collectively, delivered 52 tutorials. Students responded to a needs assessment querying confidence in various clinical domains, interest in covering clinical topics, barriers to virtual learning, and the effect of the pandemic on their education. Tutors held 1-hour, interactive tutorials over Zoom covering a variety of clinical topics. According to surveys, 91% of students (71 of 78) felt more confident in the material related to the tutorial's topic after participating. NEXT STEPS: GMEC will continue to engage students, tutors, and collaborators to facilitate the delivery of innovative, high-quality tutorials to students affected by COVID-19 in LMICs. To ensure that the platform is sustainable and aligned with GMEC's mission to promote equity in global medical education, the collaborative will need to be agile and responsive.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/ethics , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Human Rights , Humans , Interdisciplinary Placement/organization & administration , Learning , Nigeria/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL