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1.
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J ; 18(3): 78-86, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893410

ABSTRACT

During the first 2 years of the coronavirus-19 pandemic, many changes and innovations occurred to overcome the challenges associated with the pandemic and improve cardiovascular training. This review highlights the literature on the pandemic response regarding cardiovascular fellowship education and identifies areas of need to ensure future opportunities for fellows to achieve competency and career advancement. Specifically, we describe the recent changes to the four cornerstones of cardiovascular training: core content education, procedural training, career development, and the well-being of trainees.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Students, Medical/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Perspect Med Educ ; 10(2): 130-134, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872783

ABSTRACT

Major racial disparities continue to exist in our healthcare education, from the underrepresentation of ethnic minorities when teaching about clinical signs to health management in primary and secondary care. A multi-centre group of students discuss what needs to change in medical education to cultivate physicians who are better prepared to care for patients of all backgrounds. We argue that the accurate portrayal of race in medical education is a vital step towards educating medical students to consider alternative explanations to biology when considering health inequities.


Subject(s)
Perception , Racism/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/standards , Humans , Racism/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
3.
Chest ; 159(5): 1949-1960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664763

ABSTRACT

All aspects of medical education were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several challenges were experienced by trainees and programs alike, including economic repercussions of the pandemic; social distancing affecting the delivery of medical education, testing, and interviewing; the surge of patients affecting redeployment of personnel and potential compromises in core training; and the overall impact on the wellness and mental health of trainees and educators. The ability of medical teams and researchers to peer review, conduct clinical research, and keep up with literature was similarly challenged by the rapid growth in peer-reviewed and preprint literature. This article reviews these challenges and shares strategies that institutions, educators, and learners adopted, adapted, and developed to provide quality education during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
5.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc7, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503862

ABSTRACT

Background: Within days, the corona crisis has forced the "Lernzentrum", as well as all other places of training and further education, to discontinue classroom teaching at German universities and vocational schools. In order to start teaching online, tutors had to face the challenge to develop new digital learning formats (virtual classrooms) for the peer teaching of practical skills within a short time. This paper aims at outlining the project of developing e-tutorials with regard to the teaching of practical skills. Methodology: After analyzing the classroom lessons (n=30), some of the tutorials were transformed into digital formats. These so-called "e-tutorials" were held via a digital platform. They have been evaluated continuously with a standardized online questionnaire. The results of this evaluation have been analyzed descriptively. Results: From 27/04/2020 to 17/07/2020 eleven different e-tutorial formats were offered on 246 dates. The evaluation revealed a high degree of acceptance with these course offers as well as with the implementation by the tutors. Interpretation: During the pandemic crisis the substitution of peer teaching into forms of e-tutorials was considered valuable; however, these learning formats present challenges, especially with regard to the interaction between teachers and students. They cannot therefore fully replace the peer teaching of practical skills.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Teaching , Universities , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/standards , Germany , Humans , Peer Group , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards
8.
Am J Surg ; 223(2): 395-403, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The time course and longitudinal impact of the COVID -19 pandemic on surgical education(SE) and learner well-being (LWB)is unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Check-in surveys were distributed to Surgery Program Directors and Department Chairs, including general surgery and surgical specialties, in the summer and winter of 2020 and compared to a survey from spring 2020. Statistical associations for items with self-reported ACGME Stage and the survey period were assessed using categorical analysis. RESULTS: Stage 3 institutions were reported in spring (30%), summer (4%) [p < 0.0001] and increased in the winter (18%). Severe disruption (SD) was stage dependent (Stage 3; 45% (83/184) vs. Stages 1 and 2; 26% (206/801)[p < 0.0001]). This lessened in the winter (23%) vs. spring (32%) p = 0.02. LWB severe disruption was similar in spring 27%, summer 22%, winter 25% and was associated with Stage 3. CONCLUSIONS: Steps taken during the pandemic reduced SD but did not improve LWB. Systemic efforts are needed to protect learners and combat isolation pervasive in a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Humans , Learning , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
10.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1282-1290, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216685

ABSTRACT

The term "health systems science" (HSS) has recently emerged as a unifying label for competencies in health care delivery and in population and community health. Despite strong evidence that HSS competencies are needed in the current and future health care workforce, heretofore the integration of HSS into medical education has been slow or fragmented-due, in part, to a lack of evidence that these curricula improve education or population outcomes. The recent COVID-19 pandemic and the national reckoning with racial inequities in the United States further highlight the time-sensitive imperative to integrate HSS content across the medical education continuum. While acknowledging challenges, the authors highlight the unique opportunities inherent in an HSS curriculum and present an elaborated curricular framework for incorporating health care delivery and population health into undergraduate medical education. This framework includes competencies previously left out of medical education, increases the scope of faculty development, and allows for evidence of effectiveness beyond traditional learner-centric metrics. The authors apply a widely adopted 6-step approach to curriculum development to address the unique challenges of incorporating HSS. Two examples-of a module on quality improvement (health care delivery) and of an introductory course on health equity (population and community health)-illustrate how the 6-step approach can be used to build HSS curricula. The Supplemental Digital Appendix (at http://links.lww.com/ACADMED/B106) outlines this approach and provides specific examples and resources. Adapting these resources within local environments to build HSS curricula will allow medical educators to ensure future graduates have the expertise and commitment necessary to effect health systems change and to advocate for their communities, while also building the much-needed evidence for such curricula.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Delivery of Health Care , Education, Medical/methods , Population Health , Public Health/education , Systems Analysis , Curriculum/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Program Development/methods , Program Development/standards , Program Evaluation , Social Determinants of Health , United States
11.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 53, 2021 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditional, instructor led, in-person training of CPR skills has become more challenging due to COVID-19 pandemic. We compared the learning outcomes of standard in-person CPR training (ST) with alternative methods of training such as hybrid or online-only training (AT) on CPR performance, quality, and knowledge among laypersons with no previous CPR training. METHODS: We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for relevant articles from January 1995 to May 2020. Covidence was used to review articles by two independent researchers. Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment Tool was used to assess quality of the manuscripts. RESULTS: Of the 978 articles screened, twenty met the final inclusion criteria. All included studies had an experimental design and moderate to strong global quality rating. The trainees in ST group performed better on calling 911, time to initiate chest compressions, hand placement and chest compression depth. Trainees in AT group performed better in assessing scene safety, calling for help, response time including initiating first rescue breathing, adequate ventilation volume, compression rates, shorter hands-off time, confidence, willingness to perform CPR, ability to follow CPR algorithm, and equivalent or better knowledge retention than standard teaching methodology. CONCLUSION: AT methods of CPR training provide an effective alternative to the standard in-person CPR for large scale public training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Education, Medical/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Learning , Pandemics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Chest ; 159(5): 1949-1960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114400

ABSTRACT

All aspects of medical education were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several challenges were experienced by trainees and programs alike, including economic repercussions of the pandemic; social distancing affecting the delivery of medical education, testing, and interviewing; the surge of patients affecting redeployment of personnel and potential compromises in core training; and the overall impact on the wellness and mental health of trainees and educators. The ability of medical teams and researchers to peer review, conduct clinical research, and keep up with literature was similarly challenged by the rapid growth in peer-reviewed and preprint literature. This article reviews these challenges and shares strategies that institutions, educators, and learners adopted, adapted, and developed to provide quality education during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Chest ; 159(5): 1949-1960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111517

ABSTRACT

All aspects of medical education were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several challenges were experienced by trainees and programs alike, including economic repercussions of the pandemic; social distancing affecting the delivery of medical education, testing, and interviewing; the surge of patients affecting redeployment of personnel and potential compromises in core training; and the overall impact on the wellness and mental health of trainees and educators. The ability of medical teams and researchers to peer review, conduct clinical research, and keep up with literature was similarly challenged by the rapid growth in peer-reviewed and preprint literature. This article reviews these challenges and shares strategies that institutions, educators, and learners adopted, adapted, and developed to provide quality education during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(1): 84-88, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105547

ABSTRACT

Medical education has gone online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Formative assessment is essential to facilitate the learning process in medical education. However, various challenges arise during online assessment, which include reliability, when done without monitoring and practical concerns like Internet connectivity issues. This study was done to assess the medical students' perceptions of the reliability, usefulness, and practical challenges of online tests. One hundred first-year undergraduate medical students taking up online classes and tests in the subject of physiology were enrolled in this study. A questionnaire with items regarding practical challenges, reliability, and usefulness of the online tests, in general, and about different types of online assessment methods, in particular, were sent to the students online. Each item was rated on a five-point Likert scale, and the responses were analyzed anonymously. A large percentage of students used mobile phones (81.4%) to undertake online tests. Although most students (73.2%; P < 0.001) felt that online tests helped them substantially in learning the subject, network connectivity issues were considered to be a matter of serious concern (85.5%, P < 0.001). Among the assessment methods used, viva voce by video conferencing was thought to be most reliable (83%, P < 0.001). Multiple-choice question-based assessment when done online was felt to be more practically feasible with faster feedback than classroom assessment. The results of the study suggest that medical students find online formative assessments helpful for their learning, despite their concerns about reliability and practical challenges.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results
17.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 22(8): 489-493, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972993

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social distancing, implemented to decrease the spread of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), forced major changes in medical practices, including an abrupt transition from face-to-face to remote patient care. Pre-clinical medical studies were concomitantly switched to electronic distance learning. OBJECTIVES: To explore potential implications of COVID-19 on future pre-clinical medical studies. METHODS: We examined responses of pre-clinical medical students to the remote electronic learning in terms of quality of and satisfaction with teaching and technical support, attendance to classes, and the desire to continue electronic learning in the post-epidemic era. A survey of responses from first-year students at the Adelson School of Medicine was conducted. To optimize the reliability of the survey, a single research assistant conducted telephone interviews with each student, using a structured questionnaire concerning aspects of participation and satisfaction with teaching and with technical components of the remote electronic learning. RESULTS: With 100% response rate, the students reported high satisfaction with the electronic learning regarding its quality, online interactions, instructions given, technical assistance, and availability of recording for future studies. Most of the students (68.6%) noted a preference to continue < 90% of the learning online in the post-outbreak era. A high level of overall satisfaction and a low rate of technical problems during electronic learning were significantly correlated with the desire to continue online learning (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The high satisfaction and the positive experience with the electronic distance learning imposed by the COVID-19 epidemic implied a successful transition and might induce future changes in pre-clinical medical studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude , Consumer Behavior , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards , Videoconferencing
18.
Front Public Health ; 8: 609599, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971923

ABSTRACT

In the wake of COVID-19, there is an urgent need for a diverse public health work force to address problems presented or exacerbated by the global pandemic. Educational programs that create our work force both train and shape the makeup of access through graduate applications. The Graduate Record Exam has a number of standing issues, with additional barriers created by the pandemic. We trace the GRE waiver movement over several years, focusing on the gradual adoption in CEPH accredited programs and the rapid expansion of temporary waivers as a response to testing access. Going forward, we need to consider gaps in waivers during the pandemic and how this data can be used to shape our future use of the GRE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/standards , Public Health/education , School Admission Criteria/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , United States , Young Adult
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc99, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971676

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 challenges curriculum managers worldwide to create digital substitutes for classroom teaching. Case-based teaching formats under expert supervision can be used as a substitute for practical bedside teaching, where the focus is on teaching clinical reasoning skills. Methods: For medical students of LMU and TU Munich, the interactive, case-based, and supervised teaching format of Clinical Case Discussion (CCD) was digitised and implemented as dCCD in their respective curricula. Case discussions were realised as videoconferences, led by a student moderator, and took place under the supervision of a board-certified clinician. To prevent passive participation, additional cognitive activations were implemented. Acceptance, usability, and subjective learning outcomes were assessed in dCCDs by means of a special evaluation concept. Results: With regard to acceptance, students were of the opinion that they had learned effectively by participating in dCCDs (M=4.31; SD=1.37). The majority of students also stated that they would recommend the course to others (M=4.23; SD=1.62). The technical implementation of the teaching format was judged positively overall, but findings for usability were heterogeneous. Students rated their clinical reasoning skills at the end of the dCCDs (M=4.43; SD=0.66) as being significantly higher than at the beginning (M=4.33; SD=0.69), with low effect size, t(181)=-2.352, p=.020, d=0.15. Conclusion: Our evaluation data shows that the dCCD format is well-accepted by students as a substitute for face-to-face teaching. In the next step, we plan to examine the extent to which participation in dCCDs leads to an increase in objectively measured clinical reasoning skills, analogous to a face-to-face CCD with on-site attendance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Videoconferencing/standards
20.
Educ Prim Care ; 32(1): 2-5, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968896

ABSTRACT

This article sets out to highlight the challenges and opportunities for medical education in primary care realised during the COVID-19 pandemic and now being enacted globally. The themes were originally presented during a webinar involving educationalists from around the world and are subsequently discussed by members of the WONCA working party for education. The article recognises the importance of utilising diversity, addressing inequity and responding to the priority health needs of the community through socially accountable practice. The well-being of educators and learners is identified as priority in response to the ongoing global pandemic. Finally, we imagine a new era for medical education drawing on global connection and shared resources to create a strong community of practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Global Health , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Cultural Diversity , Education, Medical/standards , Health Equity/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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