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4.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(11): 1350-1354, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485407

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The main focus of education in most pathology residency and subspecialty pathology fellowships is the light microscopic examination of pathology specimens. Classes with multiheaded scopes are the most popular among pathology trainees. Until recently, it was difficult to imagine that this educational approach could change. In the beginning of March 2020, our country faced a serious challenge, which all of us now know as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The rules of social distancing and work from home were applied. These types of restrictions were implemented in almost all parts of our life, including work and pathology education. OBJECTIVE.­: To share our experience in the Department of Hematopathology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe our experience in modifying our approaches to education. We show how we overcame many obstacles to learning by building one of the largest virtual hematopathology educational platforms via Cisco WebEx and using social media, in particular Twitter. These tools facilitated the learning of hematopathology by medical students, pathology trainees, and practicing pathologists from all over the world. DATA SOURCES.­: During the first 3 months of the pandemic (April, May, and June, 2020), we evaluated the visitor attendance to the MD Anderson Cancer Center Hematopathology Virtual Educational Platform using data collected by the Cisco WebEx Web site. To determine the impact that the platform had on medical education for the hematopathology community on Twitter, the analytic metrics obtained from Symplur LLC (www.symplur.com, April 27, 2020) were used via its Symplur Signals program. CONCLUSIONS.­: Our experience using the MD Anderson Hematopathology Virtual Platform showed that there is substantial global interest and desire for virtual hematopathology education, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Hematology/education , Pathology/education , Social Media , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Texas
5.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(9): 1069-1070, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405515
6.
Korean J Med Educ ; 33(3): 163-170, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395055

ABSTRACT

It is necessary to reflect on the question, "How to prepare for medical education after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)?" Although we are preparing for the era of Education 4.0 in line with the 4th industrial revolution of artificial intelligence and big data, most measures are focused on the methodologies of transferring knowledge; essential innovation is not being addressed. What is fundamentally needed in medicine is insightful intelligence that can see the invisible. We should not create doctors who only prescribe antispasmodics for abdominal pain, or antiemetic drugs for vomiting. Good clinical reasoning is not based on knowledge alone. Insightology in medicine is based on experience through Bayesian reasoning and imagination through the theory of mind. This refers to diagnosis of the whole, greater than the sum of its parts, by looking at the invisible using the Gestalt strategy. Identifying the missing process that links symptoms is essential. This missing process can be described in one word: context. An accurate diagnosis is possible only by understanding context, which can be done by standing in someone else's shoes. From the viewpoint of medicine, Education 4.0 is worrisome because people are still clinging to methodology. The subject we should focus on is "human", not "artificial" intelligence. We should first advance the "insightology in medicine" as a new paradigm, which is the "essence" that will never change even when rare "phenomena" such as the COVID-19 outbreak occur. For this reason, we should focus on teaching insightology in medicine, rather than teaching medical knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Artificial Intelligence , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Knowledge , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Chest ; 159(5): 1949-1960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324059

ABSTRACT

All aspects of medical education were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several challenges were experienced by trainees and programs alike, including economic repercussions of the pandemic; social distancing affecting the delivery of medical education, testing, and interviewing; the surge of patients affecting redeployment of personnel and potential compromises in core training; and the overall impact on the wellness and mental health of trainees and educators. The ability of medical teams and researchers to peer review, conduct clinical research, and keep up with literature was similarly challenged by the rapid growth in peer-reviewed and preprint literature. This article reviews these challenges and shares strategies that institutions, educators, and learners adopted, adapted, and developed to provide quality education during these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(9): 1081-1088, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259720

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: Pathology education must evolve as medical knowledge expands and disruptive technologies emerge. The evolution in pathology teaching practices accelerated as traditional teaching modalities were suspended in March 2020 during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. OBJECTIVES.­: To provide pathologists an overview of established teaching paradigms and practical examples of how these paradigms may be applied to pathology education, emphasizing differences in graduate and undergraduate medical education as well as the challenges and promises of remote learning, as revealed by the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA SOURCES.­: Selected peer-reviewed publications representing the field of educational social science. CONCLUSIONS.­: Evidence-based methods described in education and social sciences can be effectively deployed in pathology education and especially remote learning, as necessitated by the current COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding established principles, such as cognitive load, competency-based learning, peer-assisted learning, and flipped classrooms may prove useful in developing effective, learner-centric content for pathology education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Pathology, Clinical/education , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Pandemics , Pathology, Clinical/trends , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J R Soc Med ; 114(3): 107, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207574
18.
Geriatr., Gerontol. Aging (Impr.) ; 14(3): 203-206, 30-09-2020.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1175698

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the discipline of geriatrics at the Santa Casa de Sao Paulo School of Medical Sciences of São Paulo was adapted to a web-based learning environment due to social distancing measures. OBJECTIVE: To describe the full adaptation of the discipline of geriatrics to a web-based learning tool, of two activities that were developed including the current COVID-19 to illustrate some of the main concepts of geriatric medicine. METHODS: The course was fully adapted to the open-source course management system called MOODLE. The first activity was a COVID-19 clinical case discussion, whose main objective was to include COVID-19 in the content of our course, illustrating some of the main concepts of geriatrics. The second activity was a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) experience, done via videoconference, which also assessed the impact of social distancing measures on the health of older adults. RESULTS: A total of 43 medical students performed both activities, and 95% of the students considered the inclusion of the COVID-19 into the discipline of geriatrics useful, 88% approved the practical experience of CGA, and 84% felt that they contributed to the health of the interviewees after contact. CONCLUSION: Adapting our discipline to a web-based learning tool, while including the current COVID-19 in our course content and a practical experience of CGA via videoconference was possible and approved by students. The adoption of this initiative may not only be an academic strategy, but also a possible way to improve the quality of life of older people during the COVID-19 pandemic


Durante a pandemia de COVID-19, a disciplina de geriatria da Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo foi adaptada a um plataforma de aprendizagem a distância devido a medidas de distanciamento social. OBJETIVO: Descrever a adaptação completa da disciplina de geriatria a uma plataforma de aprendizagem a distância de duas atividades desenvolvidas que abordaram o atual tema COVID-19 para ilustrar alguns dos principais conceitos em medicina geriátrica. METODOLOGIA: O curso foi totalmente adaptado à plataforma de aprendizagem a distância chamada MOODLE. A primeira atividade foi uma discussão de caso clínico de COVID-19, cujo objetivo principal foi incluir o tema no conteúdo de nosso curso, ilustrando alguns dos principais conceitos em geriatria. A segunda atividade foi a experiência prática da Avaliação Geriátrica Ampla (AGA), realizada por videoconferência, que também avaliou o impacto das medidas de distanciamento social na saúde de idosos. RESULTADOS: 43 estudantes de medicina realizaram as duas atividades e 95% consideraram útil a inclusão do tema COVID-19 na disciplina de geriatria, 88% aprovaram a experiência prática da AGA e 84% consideraram que contribuíam para a saúde dos entrevistados após o contato. CONCLUSÃO: A adaptação de nossa disciplina a uma plataforma de aprendizagem a distância, incluindo o tema COVID-19 no conteúdo do curso e uma experiência prática da AGA por videoconferência, foi possível e aprovada pelos alunos. A adoção dessa iniciativa pode ser não apenas uma estratégia acadêmica, mas também uma maneira possível de melhorar a qualidade de vida dos idosos durante a pandemia de COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Humans , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/trends , Brazil , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Education, Higher
19.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(5): 1163-1169, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163090

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess perceived deficiencies of reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellow education due to changes in care secondary to COVID-19. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study performed in an academic setting. A survey was generated and administered to REI fellows and attendings practicing in programs across the United States. Descriptive statistics were used to quantify results regarding clinical volume, academic responsibilities, clinical safety, and fellowship education. RESULTS: The survey response rate was 23%. Eighty-four percent of respondents self-identified as fellows, and 16% identified as program directors or other REI academic instructors. Overall, the survey responses confirmed that the COVID-19 pandemic tremendously affected clinical volume, with 91% of participants reporting their clinical volume decreased by at least half. Although 67% of attendings believed that the changes related to COVID-19 have or will have significantly affected the clinical skills of fellows, 66% of fellows did not believe that their clinical training had been significantly impacted. Sixty-seven percent of fellows and 78% of attendings do not believe that changes related to COVID-19 will affect the ability of fellows to practice independently. CONCLUSION: Even though most attendings surveyed believed that the changes related to COVID-19 would affect the clinical skills of fellows, the cessation of clinical and research activities was short-lived, likely tempering the overall effect on clinical training. Overall, most respondents did not believe that the pandemic significantly affected fellow education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Pandemics , COVID-19/virology , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
20.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(8): 1267-1270, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155438

ABSTRACT

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with poor survival. Simulation is frequently used to evaluate and train code teams with the goal of improving outcomes. All participants engaged in training on donning and doffing of personal protective equipment for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases. Thereafter, simulations of in-hospital cardiac arrest of patients with COVID-19, so-called protected code blue, were conducted at a quaternary academic centre. The primary endpoint was the mean time-to-defibrillation. A total of 114 patients participated in 33 "protected code blue" simulations over 8 weeks: 10 were senior residents, 17 were attending physicians, 86 were nurses, and 5 were respiratory therapists. Mean time-to-defibrillation was 4.38 minutes. Mean time-to-room entry, time-to-intubation, time-to-first-chest compression and time-to-epinephrine were 2.77, 5.74, 6.31, and 6.20 minutes, respectively; 92.84% of the 16 criteria evaluating the proper management of patients with COVID-19 and cardiac arrest were met. Mean time-to-defibrillation was longer than guidelines-expected time during protected code blue simulations. Although adherence to the modified advanced cardiovascular life-support protocol was high, breaches that carry additional infectious risk and reduce the efficacy of the resuscitation team were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Education, Medical , Heart Arrest , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Simulation Training/methods , Time-to-Treatment/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/standards , Clinical Protocols , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/trends , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Heart Arrest/etiology , Heart Arrest/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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