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1.
Br J Nurs ; 31(7): 386-392, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786363

ABSTRACT

Delivery of the COVID-19 vaccine has been made possible in part through the use of mass vaccination centres (MVCs). The primary legal framework underpinning the MVC programme is a national protocol enabling registered and non-registered healthcare workers to contribute to the safe and effective administration of the vaccine. The national protocol provided a vehicle for an innovative supervised student nurse placement within an MVC in south Wales. This placement, for undergraduate pre-registration student nurses, formed part of a service improvement project. Through student feedback prior to, and following, the short placement, the learning was unequivocal in terms of knowledge and skills acquisition related to safe and effective vaccine administration, with students providing clear feedback on the positive nature of the placement experience. A placement within an MVC offers a rich educational experience for student nurses, which as yet appears to be underutilised across the UK.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Mass Vaccination
2.
Nurs Sci Q ; 35(2): 256-261, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785021

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created a demand for change and innovation in nursing and nurse education. In this paper, the authors tell the story of a nurse faculty member and two of her prelicensure RN nursing students who were evicted from their classroom and clinical site because of the pandemic, but who were able to use their imagination and creativity to explore new ways of teaching and learning nursing and being a nurse. Humility and empathy are critically important aspects of imagination and creativity, particularly in nurse education. The authors also seek to consider these issues from a global perspective, thanks in part to the diversity and international backgrounds of the contributors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Imagination , Learning , Pandemics
3.
Nurs Open ; 9(3): 1643-1652, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782653

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore nursing students' need for social presence in online learning, looking at its relevance to the adopted sensory modality learning styles. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design. METHODS: Two semi-structured online focus groups were held with five second-year and seven third-year undergraduate nursing students, purposively recruited from the Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology. Using a structured guide based on the Social Presence Model, participants were asked about their perceived need for social presence (a construct used to understand online interactions), and its relevance to their learning preferences using the VARK (Visual, Aural/Auditory, Read/write and Kinesthetic) learning styles. RESULTS: Despite varying learning preferences, all participants remarked on the need for social presence. Social presence was required for their perceived learning and for actively participating in online lectures. Several participants expressed the need for social presence for a collaborative constructivist learning experience, drawing on their diverse learning styles for a better learning experience.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Learning/classification , Students, Nursing , Focus Groups , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(4): 205-207, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of an innovative approach for mental health interviews met unprecedented needs during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for patients and staff at a community health clinic and provided nursing students with a telehealth activity that met patient care education requirements while practicing essential skills. METHOD: The nursing students and instructors worked collaboratively with the clinical team to call patients using an algorithm that incorporates screeners for depression, anxiety, and chronic disease distress. RESULTS: Reports during daily debriefings and feedback obtained from evaluations were summarized by faculty and used to improve the activity. These reports indicated the experience was beneficial to students and clinic staff. CONCLUSION: Providers were able to follow up on vulnerable patients more quickly, students were able to practice essential nursing skills during a time when safety concerns limited direct patient interaction, and patients continued to feel connected to health care providers during a global pandemic. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(4):205-207.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776202

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus pandemic has dramatically affected how nursing students are educated. Distance learning has become the norm, and an evaluation of learning achievement is needed. This is a mixed-method study of teaching presence, self-regulated learning, and learning satisfaction in distance learning to evaluate the learning achievement of students in a nursing education program. Ninety-four students for quantitative and seven students for qualitative research were sampled. All the sampled students attend the nursing education program in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province and were enrolled during the first semester of 2020. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS/WIN 21.0, and qualitative data were analyzed via content analysis in NVivo 12. Teaching presence and self-regulated learning were identified as the factors affecting learning satisfaction. In a focus group interview, teaching presence increased when the students received feedback and saw the faces of their professors. Self-regulated learning occurred when they had opportunities to practice self-study and leadership and when they formed relationships between professors and colleagues. These methods have also been recognized to increase learning satisfaction. Considering the results of this study, it is necessary to develop teaching methods that enhance the learning satisfaction of students in distance learning nursing education programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Teaching
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 231, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently raging all over the world. COVID-19 can be transmitted among humans. To control the spread of the epidemic and meet the learning needs of students, Chinese universities have used a variety of multimedia forms to conduct online teaching. However, the influence of different teaching methods on the learning effects of nursing students has not been conclusive, and few studies have directly compared the differences in the effects of different teaching methods. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of different teaching methods on students' learning effects. METHODS: A total of 119 participants from the graduating class of 2022 performed 4 validated classes (fundamental nursing, medical nursing, surgical nursing, and paediatric nursing) through network teaching. A total of 126 participants from the graduating class of 2021 used the traditional teaching method and were enrolled as a control group. All participants completed a questionnaire, which was designed by the school for teaching evaluation, and took a test after the courses. RESULTS: A total of 245 nursing undergraduates were ultimately enrolled. The analysis of the academic performance and the student evaluations from the four courses showed no significant difference between the network teaching group and the traditional teaching group for nursing undergraduates (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Through the convenience of network teaching, teachers and students can choose the time and place of both their teaching and learning independently. Moreover, such use effectively prevents the spread of the epidemic. After the epidemic concludes, the continued use of the network teaching method can help improve teaching efficiency by being combined with the traditional teaching method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Learning
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The infodemic has been co-existing with the COVID-19 pandemic with an influx of misinformation and conspiracy theories. These affect people's psychological health and adherence to preventive measures. eHealth literacy (eHEALS) may help with alleviating the negative effects of the infodemic. As nursing students are future healthcare professionals, having adequate eHEALS skills is critically important in their clinical practice, safety, and health. This study aimed to (1) explore the eHEALS level and its associated factors, and (2) examine the associations of eHEALS with preventive behaviors, fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19S), anxiety, and depression among nursing students. METHODS: We surveyed 1851 nursing students from 7 April to 31 May 2020 from eight universities across Vietnam. Data were collected, including demographic characteristics, eHEALS, adherence to preventive behaviors (handwashing, mask-wearing, physical distancing), FCV-19S, anxiety, and depression. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed appropriately to examine associations. RESULTS: The mean score of eHEALS was 31.4 ± 4.4. The eHEALS score was significantly higher in males (unstandardized regression coefficient, B, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.15 to 1.73; p = 0.019), and students with a better ability to pay for medication (B, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.39 to 1.19; p < 0.001), as compared to their counterparts. Nursing students with a higher eHEALS score had a higher likelihood of adhering to hand-washing (odds ratio, OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.22; p < 0.001), mask-wearing (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.19; p < 0.001), keeping a safe physical distance (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.25; p < 0.001), and had a lower anxiety likelihood (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.99; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students who were men and with better ability to pay for medication had higher eHEALS scores. Those with higher eHEALS scores had better adherence to preventive measures, and better psychological health. The development of strategies to improve eHEALS of nursing students may contribute to COVID-19 containment and improve their psychological health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Health Literacy , Students, Nursing , Telemedicine , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(3): 143-146, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Competent clinical judgment about pharmacological therapies by nurses is essential for safe medication outcomes. This study examined the impact of postclinical pharmacology-focused reflective debriefing sessions on clinical judgment in prelicensure senior nursing students. METHOD: A nonrandomized repeated measures design was used to compare clinical judgment of students who participated in an additional learning activity with students who did not. Data were collected using Lasater's Clinical Judgment Rubric. RESULTS: Within-groups analysis of variance demonstrated statistically significant increases in clinical judgment scores at mid- and late-semester timepoints for the entire cohort of participants (n = 128). However, analysis of covariance showed no statistically significant differences in the clinical judgment scores for the intervention (n = 62) and control (n = 66) groups. CONCLUSION: Clinical experiences provide opportunities for prelicensure students to develop clinical judgment about pharmacological therapies. Nurse educators must implement and evaluate strategies to foster this process. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(3):143-146.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Clinical Competence , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Judgment
9.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(3): 162-166, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Innovative teaching that effectively promotes learning is a process called brain science. Chemicals released during motivation and attention lead to improved learning, and chemicals released during high-stress situations deter learning. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created unprecedented stress while providing an opportunity to create innovative strategies for facilitated learning. METHOD: To meet the pandemic challenges of a traditional undergraduate nursing program at a large state-funded university, specialty course faculty collaborated to redesign the courses using brain science concepts. RESULTS: Students demonstrated improved average course scores across courses compared with previous students (obstetrics, 2%; pediatrics, 4.34%; and critical care, 1.38%). Overall student feedback was positive. CONCLUSION: Brain science provides the foundation for advanced education that promotes optimal learning. The stress of the COVID-19 pandemic has created the opportunity for the implementation of an advanced educational model in which learning is facilitated and supported. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(3):162-166.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Brain , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 107, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Innovative and student-centered teaching methods are required to improve critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an oncology internship training on learning outcomes of nursing students using an integrated teaching-learning method. METHODS: A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental study was conducted among 107 undergraduate nursing students in fourth year who were allocated to two groups (intervention group = 51 and control group = 55) to receive an integrated teaching-learning method and routine method respectively. Data was collected using the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale (CDMNS) and the students' cognitive learning test. RESULTS: Difference in mean scores of cognitive learning test post-intervention was significant between the two groups (p < 0.001). Total CDMNS scores and its dimensions increased significantly for the intervention group post-intervention (p < 0.001). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that when the effect of confounding variables, such as the student's Grade Point Average (GPA) and the pre-test scores of cognitive learning and decision-making scale were held constant, the effect of the independent variable (group) on students' cognitive learning test (p = 0.002) and CDMNS (p = 0.004) was significant. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students' cognitive learning and clinical decision-making scores were improved as a result of the integrated teaching-learning method. Nursing educators can use this method in clinical education to improve students' cognitive and meta-cognitive skills, thereby improving nursing care quality.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Clinical Decision-Making , Cognition , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology
12.
Nurse Educ Today ; 111: 105309, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Experiential clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education allows for fusion of nursing knowledge with practice to ensure the development of competent graduate nurses. The global COVID-19 pandemic necessitated an abrupt transition from in-person clinical educational experiences to emergency remote clinical teaching. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of baccalaureate nursing clinical faculty who transitioned from in-person clinical to emergency remote clinical teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic in spring 2020. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used. SETTING: The study took place in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen baccalaureate nursing clinical faculty participated in the study. METHODS: Participants engaged in semi-structured, in-depth, online interviews. RESULTS: Five themes emerged from the data: transition, collaboration and support, the joy of teaching, authentic professional experience, and the overarching primary theme, stress of the moment. CONCLUSIONS: The transition to emergency remote clinical teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic caused stress and anxiety. However, there were important lessons learned about how to best support students and faculty while providing a robust online learning experience. Understanding the experiences of clinical nursing faculty during this abrupt transition can support recommendations for best practices in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
13.
Br J Nurs ; 31(3): 112, 2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703065
14.
Nurs Open ; 9(2): 1105-1113, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705597

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aims to compare the early development of professional value between the students in the traditional programme (BSN) and those in the accelerated BSN (ABSN) programmes. DESIGN: A longitudinal design was conducted. METHODS: Data were collected from three schools of nursing during one academic year. A total of 117 BSN students and 101 ABSN students completed the survey of demographic information and the Nurses' Professional Values Scale-Revised questionnaires. All data were analysed by IBM SPSS-Statistics 22. RESULTS: Results showed that, in the beginning of the first professional nursing course, both students in the BSN and the ABSN programmes reported similar level of professional values. However, after one academic year, the changes in the professional value varied both between these two programmes and among the three different nursing schools. The increased professional value in school A represented the possibility for students to improve during their first-year professional nursing programme. As educators, we should redesign our teaching strategies according to the different conditions of students in each programme.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Schools, Nursing , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Nurse Educ Today ; 111: 105301, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693077

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, universities adopted online teaching as the primary teaching and learning method. Most of the online teaching, however, has been limited to the broadcasting of asynchronous lectures and sharing of teaching materials. OBJECTIVES: To explore undergraduate nursing students' self-regulated learning experiences, satisfaction, and attitudes toward older persons in a gerontological nursing course using online self-regulated enquiry-based learning (EBL) during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A mixed-methods design was adopted. SETTING: A university in Hong Kong providing pre-registration nursing programmes. PARTICIPANTS: 155 students studying in the fourth year in a five-year Bachelor of Nursing programme participated in the quantitative study in which 18 joined the focus groups (4 groups with group size of 4-5). METHODS: Five video-based scenarios along with two interactive online workshops, a mind-map development exercise, gamified assessments, reading materials, group discussions, and presentations were adopted in a gerontological nursing course offered in 2019-2020 to enhance the students' learning, driven by a process of enquiry. Attitudes toward older people were measured at baseline and one week after the course (post-test). Information on self-regulated learning experiences, satisfaction, and confidence were collected at post-test only. Paired t-tests and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Focus groups were conducted through semi-structured interviews and transcribed verbatim for inductive content analysis. RESULTS: A significant improvement was demonstrated in the students' attitude toward older people. The students appreciated the opportunities provided by the online EBL to apply key concepts of gerontology in the teaching and learning activities and to enhance their critical thinking skills. Three major themes were revealed from the focus group: Perception of the teaching pedagogy, Improvement of cognitive skills, and Positive and negative aspects of the learning experience. CONCLUSIONS: The online self-regulated EBL improved the students' online learning experience in a gerontological nursing course during the pandemic and improved their attitudes toward older people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Nursing/psychology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based learning (SBL) in nursing education is an innovative pedagogical approach that has significantly improved nursing education. Adopting SBL provides a controlled environment for meeting educational objectives without the risk of harm to real patients. Given that social distancing is required during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, SBL is a suitable alternative to clinical training for nursing students to learn and acquire the required clinical competencies. The study aimed to describe the effectiveness of SBL as a complete substitute for clinical experience from the perspective of students. This cross-sectional descriptive survey investigated students' perceptions regarding the description of the effectiveness of SBL in four nursing colleges at four different universities across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. SETTINGS: Four nursing colleges at four different universities across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Participants included nursing students who attended simulation sessions. Data were collected by distributing a self-administrated online questionnaire, the Modified Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET-M), which is a 19-item. RESULTS: Approximately two-thirds of the participants were in their third (30.4%) and fourth (44.5%) academic year. The highest student presentation was for Site 1 (39.5%) and Site 2 (32.5%). Significant differences existed in all domains according to sex and university (p ≤ 0.001). There was a significant difference in relation to the level of agreement for pre-briefing, scenario, and debriefing domains (<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: SBL is a valuable teaching strategy that enhances nursing students' self-awareness, self-confidence, clinical performance, and efficiency in performing procedures with considerable gender variation. Female students had more positive perceptions toward simulation effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(2): 105-106, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has and continues to challenge nursing faculty in providing students with traditional capstone experiences. Because of the pandemic, nursing students have been limited in participating in traditional capstone projects within community and health care settings. METHOD: In collaboration with the local public health department, senior nursing students were asked to volunteer in a public health project called a Serosurvey. Faculty quickly pivoted course curriculum to continue to meet course outcomes, while incorporating the Serosurvey as an alternative capstone project. RESULTS: A total of 85 baccalaureate nursing students participated in the alternative capstone project. Students were active participants in the interprofessional project, which increased their awareness of public health needs and issues while fostering critical thinking, time management, and resilience skills. CONCLUSION: Nursing faculty can identify opportunities presented by the COVID-19 pandemic and quickly involve their students in projects and community work as part of their curriculum. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(2):105-106.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Curriculum , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Nurse Educ Today ; 111: 105297, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670934

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, nurse education institutions are required to create innovative and diverse educational methods to ensure the continued learning of undergraduate nursing students. We developed a telehealth clinical practice program to address this challenge. OBJECTIVES: We explored the students' learning experiences of our telehealth clinical practice program by qualitatively analyzing student reports. METHODS: The participants were fourth-year undergraduate students who had taken the telehealth clinical practice program at Hiroshima University. Data were collected as reports from the participants during clinical practice and analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Of the 59 students who completed the practical training, 26 agreed to participate in the study (consent rate: 44.1%). Sixteen themes emerged from the analysis as the students' learning experiences, and were classified into four thematic categories: (1) recognition of continued self-improvement required to become a nurse and development of a sense of ethics, (2) improvement of knowledge and practical skills in chronic care nursing, (3) acquisition of telehealth skills, and (4) learning through modeling and teamwork, and improvement of self-efficacy. Interacting with persons through telehealth provided an opportunity to learn directly about persons' lives and their experiences of illness, and helped participants develop a sense of responsibility and ethical nursing. CONCLUSIONS: Our study findings indicate that undergraduate nursing students perceived that their attitude, knowledge and skill acquisition improved through this program. We believe that telehealth can have a place as a teaching strategy and this telehealth clinical practice program can be further enhanced the learning effects by combining it with face-to-face training and multidisciplinary education in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Telemedicine , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
19.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 43(2): 74-79, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672280

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to uncover the experience of being a full-time academic nurse educator (ANE) in a baccalaureate or higher degree nursing program during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: In 2020, ANEs who were teaching in clinical and classroom settings, conducting in-person research, and engaging in service were suddenly required to work under new COVID-19-induced conditions. METHOD: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used for the study. Personal interviews and a demographic questionnaire were utilized to collect data. RESULTS: Fourteen ANEs participated. Five themes were uncovered through data analysis: riding a rollercoaster, figuring it out, giving and getting help, seeing silver linings, and feeling loss. CONCLUSION: This study uncovered the experience of being an ANE during the pandemic. The findings inform strategies to enhance working conditions for current and future ANEs during the remainder of the pandemic and in post-COVID-19 nursing education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Employment , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
JBI Evid Synth ; 19(11): 2929-2957, 2021 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662868

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This scoping review sought to establish the current state of knowledge regarding physical assessment skills taught globally in undergraduate nursing curricula. Explicitly, the review aimed to determine which skills are being taught via curricula and which skills are performed by students in clinical placements, as well as what physical assessment skills are being used by registered nurses in practice. INTRODUCTION: Nursing programs are expected to teach the physical assessment skills required for entry-level registered nurses to practice competently. The discrepancy lies in determining which skills are essential to teach entry-level nurses and which are unessential. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Studies that examined physical assessment skills taught to students in any undergraduate registered nursing program or used by registered nurses in practice were considered. Physical assessments included all techniques or skills taught in any year of a university or college teaching global registered nursing curricula. METHODS: Databases searched included MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL Complete (EBSCO), Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Ovid). Sources of unpublished studies included ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, OpenGrey, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, and Google Scholar. Studies published in English between January 2008 and November 2019 were included. Two independent reviewers screened titles and abstracts. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were imported into the Covidence systematic review manager. Extracted data were presented in a descriptive format, including characteristics of included studies and relevant key findings. RESULTS: Thirteen records were extracted for synthesis: one integrated review, one author reflection, one mixed methods study, and 10 quantitative studies. The sources represented a global context: the United States, New Zealand, Turkey, Australia, Norway, Korea, Italy, and one of unknown origin. Three studies examined physical assessment skills routinely taught in global nursing curricula. Three studies explored physical assessment skills routinely used by students during nursing programs. Seven studies examined which physical assessment skills were routinely performed by registered nurses in practice. In the studies, there were 98 to 122 physical assessment skills taught in global nursing programs. However, only 33 skills were routinely taught in curricula, and of those, only 20 were the same across all studies (core skills). Students in nursing programs routinely performed 30 physical assessment skills, and six of the 30 skills were the same across all studies (core skills). Of the six core skills routinely performed by students, five were also routinely taught in nursing curricula in the included studies. Registered nurses routinely performed 39 physical assessment skills, and 11 skills were the same across all studies (core skills). Ten of the physical assessment skills taught in curricula were routinely performed by registered nurses in practice. CONCLUSION: This scoping review provides insight into physical assessment skills taught in nursing curricula and used by registered nurses in practice. This knowledge is essential for curriculum revisions and planning as it provides insight on how to best meet the needs of future nursing students.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Curriculum , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Physical Examination , United States
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