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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 44-47, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584033

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Restrictions on groups and public gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic have limited in-person learning experiences for nursing students. But the crisis has also led to unanticipated opportunities. In this article, we describe how participation in vaccination clinics at our university offered students occasions for experiential learning that aren't normally part of nursing education. Volunteering at these clinics allowed our students to practice important skills while participating in efforts to help mitigate the spread of the virus.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing/trends , Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/trends , Georgia , Humans
2.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2021 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403335

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is limited knowledge about students' experiences with virtual simulation when using a video conferencing system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how second-year undergraduate nursing students experienced learning through virtual simulations during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study had an exploratory design with both quantitative and qualitative approaches. In total, 69 nursing students participated in two sessions of virtual simulation during spring 2020, and 33 students answered online questionnaires at session 1. To further explore students' experiences, one focus group interview and one individual interview were conducted using a video conferencing system after session 2. In addition, system information on use during both sessions was collected. RESULTS: Changes in the students' ratings of their experiences of virtual simulation with the Body Interact™ system were statistically significant. The virtual simulation helped them to bridge gaps in both the teaching and learning processes. Four important aspects of learning were identified: 1) learning by self-training, 2) learning from the software (Body Interact™), 3) learning from peers, and 4) learning from faculty. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that virtual simulation through a video conferencing system can be useful for student learning and feedback from both peers and faculty is important.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation/statistics & numerical data , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Videotape Recording/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , User-Computer Interface
3.
Br J Nurs ; 30(14): S34-S41, 2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319861

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: For the student nurse, peripheral venous cannulation is one of the most stressful skills to be learned. Although some healthcare employers/establishments offer courses on vascular access and infusion nursing as part of their onboarding programs, ultimately educational institutions should share the responsibility to ensure that graduating nurses can provide safe infusion therapies. METHODS: An innovative vascular access and infusion nursing (VAIN) curriculum was created and mapped onto the entry to practice undergraduate nursing program at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada. This presented an opportunity to implement new teaching approaches. RESULTS: Students experienced multiple new teaching approaches including multimedia and experiential learning and live simulation to ensure acquisition of knowledge and psychomotor skills. The teaching approaches had to be rapidly modified with the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The VAIN curriculum emphasizes simulation and directed practice, seeking to increase competence, confidence, and knowledge. The pandemic underscored the need for flexibility and creativity in content delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catheterization, Peripheral , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Canada/epidemiology , Catheterization, Peripheral/nursing , Curriculum , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching
4.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 289-292, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Finding the right method to influence student engagement with research can provide a unique opportunity to positively affect students' perceptions of nursing research. Therefore, the purpose of this educational program was to implement an experiential learning opportunity for junior-year nursing students. METHOD: Faculty developed a program that focused on the development of a research study in association with the university health center. A retrospective chart review that focused on various social behaviors was identified as an appropriate research project. RESULTS: Students who were enrolled in the course were divided into five groups. Each student reviewed and collected data from 18 charts. Data collection and entry occurred concurrently. CONCLUSION: Students acknowledged they learned about the research process and enjoyed the experience. This program enhanced students' experiences with research. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):289-292.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Problem-Based Learning , Community Health Centers , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Students, Nursing , Universities
5.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2021 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202200

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has impacted overall nursing education program requirements, classroom delivery of theory hours, as well as clinical and laboratory learning opportunities for students. The aims of this study were to explore the impacts of COVID 19 on the students' perceptions of readiness for practice and their preparation for the NCLEX exam and initial clinical practice. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on senior BSN students' preparation for NCLEX and future careers. The Casey-Fink Readiness for Practice Survey was used to investigate the perceptions of the BSN students' clinical confidence and readiness for practice. RESULTS: Students reported substantial impacts of COVID-19 on their clinical experiences, their ability to practice skills and procedures, their preparations for NCLEX exam, and their nursing career. The most significant confidence concerns noted from this study seemed to center on handling multiple patient assignments, calling the physician, responding to a change in patient condition, and treating a dying patient. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare experts expect that the impact of COVID-19 may last until 2022. More research is needed to understand the impact of COVID-19 on nursing education and transition to nursing practice. While clinical confidence and readiness for practice are essential topics, more research is needed to investigate the psychological and physiological impacts of COVID-19 on nurses, nursing students, nursing preceptors, and faculty members.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Conflict, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Education Research
6.
Nurse Educ Today ; 100: 104829, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unprecedented abrupt shift to remote online learning (OL) within the context of the national lockdown due to the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) highlights the importance of addressing students' preparedness in managing their first experiences with OL. PURPOSE: To investigate the experiences of undergraduate nursing students during their first uses of OL to increase the understanding of their encountered opportunities and challenges. DESIGN: A descriptive qualitative design guided by a phenomenological approach was used. METHODS: The study used a purposive sampling technique to recruit 18 undergraduate nursing students from two universities. Data were collected using two focus group discussions, and the discussions with participants were audio/video recorded through the online platform Zoom due to the national imposed curfew. Content analysis employed Colaizzi's steps to derive the themes/categories. RESULTS: The study revealed four themes: experience of helplessness, burdens, and burnout; the need for social and technical support to manage OL; the propensity to consider OL as a positive opportunity; and the deficiency of OL in fulfilling the educational outcomes of clinical courses. CONCLUSIONS: Abrupt remote OL was a challenge to clinical encounters. This format was very stressful; however, it was also useful. The current study highlighted the need for further research on the effectiveness of remote OL platforms in regard to the achievement of the intended learning outcomes of clinical courses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Pandemics , Students, Nursing/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Qualitative Research , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067708

ABSTRACT

Generation Z nursing students have a distinctive combination of attitudes, beliefs, social norms, and behaviors that will modify education and the nursing profession. This cross-sectional research study aimed to explore the social media use and characteristics of Generation Z in nursing students and to identify what were the most useful and preferred teaching methods during clinical training. Participants were Generation Z nursing degree students from a Spanish Higher Education Institution. A 41-item survey was developed and validated by an expert panel. The consecutive sample consisted of 120 students. Participants used social media for an average of 1.37 h (SD = 1.15) for clinical learning. They preferred, as teaching methods, linking mentorship learning to clinical experiences (x¯ = 3.51, SD = 0.88), online tutorials or videos (x¯ = 3.22, SD = 0.78), interactive gaming (x¯ = 3.09, SD = 1.14), and virtual learning environments (x¯ = 3, SD = 1.05). Regarding generational characteristics, the majority either strongly agreed or agreed with being high consumers of technology and cravers of the digital world (90.1%, n = 108 and 80%, n = 96). The authors consider it essential to expand our knowledge about the usefulness or possible use of teaching methods during clinical learning, which is essential at this moment because of the rapidly changing situation due to the Covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Social Media , Students, Nursing , Teaching , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Prof Nurs ; 36(6): 685-691, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060661

ABSTRACT

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced university campuses and healthcare agencies to temporarily suspend both undergraduate and graduate direct care educational experiences, nursing programs had to formulate alternative plans to facilitate clinical learning. Texas Woman's University used this opportunity to assemble a faculty group tasked with creating a set of college-wide guidelines for virtual simulation use as a substitution for traditional face-to-face clinical. The process included completing a needs assessment of both undergraduate and graduate level programs across three campuses and identifying regulatory requirements and limitations for clinical experiences. The task force utilized the information gathered to develop evidence-based recommendations for simulation hour equivalence ratios and compiled a list of virtual activities and products faculty could use to complete clinical experiences. Undergraduate and graduate student surveys were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the transition to virtual clinical experiences. Overall, the majority of survey results were positive regarding virtual simulation experiences providing students with valuable opportunities to enhance their learning. Negative comments regarding the impact of COVID-19 on a personal level included issues involving internet access and web conferencing logistics, lack of motivation to study, family difficulties, and faculty inexperience teaching in an online environment. Undergraduate pre-licensure students were provided with opportunities to successfully complete all remaining required clinical hours virtually, while graduate students were allowed to complete non-direct care hours as applicable using virtual clinical experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Faculty, Nursing , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students, Nursing/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Texas
9.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(12): 701-704, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Loss of in-person clinical experiences due to the COVID-19 pandemic created the need for a rapid transition to online clinical education using virtual simulation, which has been shown to be an effective teaching-learning method. Standards of best practice for simulation provide a framework for implementation. METHOD: Using free online simulation programs, 15 faculty members offered 3-hour synchronous sessions covering 20 different topics via an online meeting platform to 42 senior nursing students. Students were invited to complete an evaluation following each session. RESULTS: Students collectively logged over 1,200 hours of simulation time attending approximately 100 sessions. Postsimulation evaluations captured students' responses to sessions. Students appreciated the opportunity to review content covered in previous semesters and engaged most when simulations followed a consistent structure, were interactive, and contained visually engaging materials. CONCLUSION: Resourceful faculty responded quickly and creatively to the urgent need to transition to online clinical learning and created positive experiences for students. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(12):701-704.].


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Simulation Training/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Nursing
10.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(12): 709-713, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948855

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, hands-on training was suspended. It was necessary to adapt teaching methodologies for use in online environments and this represented an innovation. METHOD: A classroom experience was created and trialed from April to May 2020 in the course Practicum V of the Nursing Degree at the University of Seville. It was divided into three phases and consisted of two activities for students to complete: (a) a webinar with previous autonomous student work, and (b) the design and creation of a clinical case by students with the nursing diagnosis "00030 impaired gas exchange" as the starting premise. RESULTS: The students demonstrated that they had acquired the minimum levels of knowledge and skills required in searching for the best scientific evidence and creating a clinical case. CONCLUSION: Teaching staff should design strategies for the acquisition of clinical skills by students, despite the interruption of hands-on training. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(12):709-713.].


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Spain/epidemiology , Students, Nursing
11.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): E64-E69, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Improving nursing students' knowledge and clinical judgment related to mechanical ventilation (MV) is paramount, considering the heightened need for MV due to the current COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. High-fidelity simulation (HFS) provides students with real-life clinical experiences that they would rarely confront in clinical training, especially complex case scenarios (such as a patient needing MV). PURPOSE: This study assessed students' clinical knowledge and judgment after including HFS involving MV in an undergraduate nursing program. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental design with a convenience sample of 151 nursing students using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the intervention and control groups in knowledge (t = 20.42; P = .001) and total clinical judgment scores (t = 19.55; P < .001) post-HFS. CONCLUSIONS: Including a complex case study using MV and HFS significantly improved students' clinical decision-making, clinical knowledge, and self-confidence and enhanced their critical thinking, noticing, interpreting, reflecting, and responding capabilities.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , High Fidelity Simulation Training , Respiration, Artificial , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Judgment , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Respiration, Artificial/nursing , Students, Nursing/psychology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895363

ABSTRACT

Due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, there are many restrictions in effect in clinical nursing practice. Since effective educational strategies are required to enhance nursing students' competency in clinical practice, this study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of simulation problem-based learning (S-PBL). A quasi-experimental control group pretest-post-test design was used. Nursing students were allocated randomly to the control group (n = 31) and the experimental group (n = 47). Students in the control group participated in a traditional maternity clinical practicum for a week, while students in the experimental group participated S-PBL for a week. The students in the experimental group were trained in small groups using a childbirth patient simulator (Gaumard® Noelle® S554.100, Miami, USA) based on a standardized scenario related to obstetric care. The students' learning attitude, metacognition, and critical thinking were then measured via a self-reported questionnaire. Compared with the control group, the pre-post difference in learning attitude and critical thinking increased significantly (p < 0.01) in the experimental group. S-PBL was found to be an effective strategy for improving nursing students' learning transfer. Thus, S-PBL that reflects various clinical situations is recommended to improve the training in maternal health nursing.


Subject(s)
Competency-Based Education/methods , Metacognition , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Thinking , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Preceptorship , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(15)2020 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693540

ABSTRACT

The current state of alarm due to the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the urgent change in the education of nursing students from traditional to distance learning. The objective of this study was to discover the learning experiences and the expectations about the changes in education, in light of the abrupt change from face-to-face to e-learning education, of nursing students enrolled in the Bachelor's and Master's degree of two public Spanish universities during the first month of confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Qualitative study was conducted during the first month of the state of alarm in Spain (from 25 March-20 April 2020). Semi-structured interviews were given to students enrolled in every academic year of the Nursing Degree, and nurses who were enrolled in the Master's programs at two public universities. A maximum variation sampling was performed, and an inductive thematic analysis was conducted. The study was reported according with COREQ checklist. Thirty-two students aged from 18 to 50 years old participated in the study. The interviews lasted from 17 to 51 min. Six major themes were defined: (1) practicing care; (2) uncertainty; (3) time; (4) teaching methodologies; (5) context of confinement and added difficulties; (6) face-to-face win. The imposition of e-learning sets limitations for older students, those who live in rural areas, with work and family responsibilities and with limited electronic resources. Online education goes beyond a continuation of the face-to-face classes. Work should be done about this for the next academic year as we face an uncertain future in the short-term control of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
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