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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
2.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(3): 106-108, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732313

ABSTRACT

Engaging clinical nurses in nursing research requires value for the nurses and a structured process. One way to involve nurses in research is through development of a research compendium. A professional development specialist can lead the creation of a research compendium. Identifying key stakeholders, developing a technologic infrastructure, piloting the compendium, gaining feedback, and identifying outcomes that will be evaluated are key. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(3):106-108.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Nursing Research , Humans , Technology
4.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(1): 10-12, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598751

ABSTRACT

Health care studies that use Q methodology have increased dramatically in recent years, but most nurses have not learned about this mixed methods approach in their research classes. This teaching column will help readers understand some of the unique terms and characteristics of Q methodology. Understanding this method can help nurses performing evidence-based practice and education. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(1):10-12.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Reading , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Learning
5.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(1): 35-41, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593936

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: School nurses serve a critical role in academic settings, but evidence indicates that nurses may need help transitioning their generalist nursing training to the school environment (Camp). Continuing education (CE) can be an effective way for school nurses to develop the specialty skills needed for this practice environment (Gormley; Quinn & Smolinski), but a better understanding of how nurses engage in CE is needed to guide course development. The goal of this study is to describe how South Carolina school nurses engage with CE to guide future CE development efforts. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive design was used to describe engagement in CE for 24 participating South Carolina school nurses. RESULTS: School nurses experienced CE as a process that included deciding to attend, experiencing the course, and implementing practice change. Subthemes relevant to these steps also emerged. CONCLUSION: For school nurses, CE is a process and is not perceived as a one-time event. Design recommendations and strategies are presented. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(1):35-41.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Schools , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 537-540, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598060

ABSTRACT

When we look back on 2020, it is hard not to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic that has affected everything from nursing practice to world politics. Along with those challenges, there has been tremendous opportunity for nursing professional development change and growth. 2020 brought several key issues into play related to nursing continuing professional development. This article highlights many of these important issues. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):537-540.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Staff Development/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 44-47, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584033

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Restrictions on groups and public gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic have limited in-person learning experiences for nursing students. But the crisis has also led to unanticipated opportunities. In this article, we describe how participation in vaccination clinics at our university offered students occasions for experiential learning that aren't normally part of nursing education. Volunteering at these clinics allowed our students to practice important skills while participating in efforts to help mitigate the spread of the virus.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing/trends , Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/trends , Georgia , Humans
8.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(12): 545-548, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556793

ABSTRACT

This year was a challenge in so many ways! Yet, it offered nursing professional development practitioners opportunities to think creatively and collaboratively while implementing new and better ways of delivering education and professional development. This column looks at some of the more notable events of 2021 and how they impacted education and professional development. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(12):545-548.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans
9.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(12): 645-650, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532617

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to understand registered nurses' (RNs') perceptions of attending a live streaming versus in-person continuing education event. BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 global pandemic, in-person continuing education events for healthcare providers required conversion to digital platforms. Literature is sparse regarding healthcare providers' perceptions on attending a live streaming continuing education event. METHODS: Registered nurses completed a survey after a live streaming research conference from a large US healthcare system. Likert-scale survey items were analyzed using descriptive statistics and open-ended questions with content analysis and thematic coding. RESULTS: A total of 219 RNs participated. The RNs reported an overall positive experience with the live streaming event and indicated a preference for this platform for the future. Three benefits emerged: savings, self-care and safety, and user-friendly. Perceived drawbacks were coded with 3 themes: technical issues, impaired focus, and social/networking challenges. CONCLUSIONS: Despite challenges, live streaming conferences may be satisfying and preferable for nurses.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Distance/economics , Nurses/psychology , Perception , Quality Improvement , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
10.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(9): 404-406, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372092

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic necessitated shifts in education delivery, forcing professional development specialists toward alternative learning delivery methods. Members of an academic-practice partnership at a Midwestern hospital collaboratively designed virtual evidence-based education modules for staff onboarding. We describe the transition from in-person education to online professional development. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(9):404-406.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Curriculum , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0249872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341484

ABSTRACT

This paper analyzes the application of various telemedicine services in Gansu Province, China during the COVID-19 epidemic, and summarizes the experiences with these services. In addition, the satisfaction levels of patients and doctors with the application of telemedicine in COVID-19 were investigated, the deficiencies of telemedicine in Gansu were determined, and recommendations for modification were proposed. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has broken out in China, and Gansu Province in Northwest of China has not been spared. To date, there are 91 local COVID-19 cases and 42 imported cases. 109 hospitals were selected as designated hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak, and most of them were secondary hospitals. However, it was unsatisfactory that the ability of medical services is relatively low in most of secondary hospitals and primary hospitals. Therefore, we helped the secondary hospitals cope with COVID-19 by means of remote consultation, long-distance education, telemedicine question and answer (Q&A). Our practical experience shows that telemedicine can be widely used during the COVID-19 epidemic, especially in developing countries and areas with lagging medical standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Geography , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Software , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods
12.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(8): 352-354, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332183

ABSTRACT

The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Practice Transition Accreditation Program (PTAP) sponsors an annual symposium for participants to share in best practices across the globe. Due to COVID-19, the 2021 symposium was held virtually. With close to 700 participants, the ANCC PTAP team was challenged to provide an engaging virtual conference. This column speaks to the success of the symposium based on creating, cultivating, and celebrating best practices. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(8):352-354.].


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Evidence-Based Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Credentialing , Evidence-Based Nursing/education , Humans , Internet , Societies, Nursing , United States/epidemiology
13.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(7): 309-311, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295973

ABSTRACT

To continue nursing leadership development experiences in a virtual world requires planning and perseverance. Given the current landscape of health care, a view toward healthy work environment experiences is critical to maintain participant engagement while meeting educational objectives. This article outlines the steps and key points important in developing healthy work environment nursing leadership experiences. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(7):309-311.].


Subject(s)
Nurse Administrators , Nursing Care , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans , Leadership , Workplace
14.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(7): 303, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295972
15.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(5): 214-216, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234856

ABSTRACT

Health care professionals must be adept at conducting and using evidence-based practice (EBP). No best method to teach EBP to health care providers exists. This article outlines the steps and key points found to be important when developing and teaching EBP to interprofessional executive health care teams. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(5):214-216.].


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Evidence-Based Practice , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/education , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Patient Care Team/organization & administration
16.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(4): 198-204, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211959

ABSTRACT

Health research is published at a breathtaking pace and quantity; however, even when research is systematically developed into best practices and/or clinical guidelines, it often is not implemented into practice. Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is an evidence-based professional development approach that can help nurses to stay current and apply new knowledge to practice. The purpose of this article is to describe ECHO as a model for professional development and capacity building through learning networks. This article describes the ECHO model, evidence supporting its use, the infrastructure needed to implement an ECHO network, and two nursing ECHO learning networks. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(4):198-204.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans , Learning
17.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(4): 160-162, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211957

ABSTRACT

Generation Z is entering the workforce, requiring nursing professional development (NPD) practitioners to consider their unique characteristics when planning ongoing professional learning. They are also entering the profession at a time when concerns for well-being and resilience are at an all-time high. This article compares psychological capital scores between generational cohorts and provides strategies for the NPD practitioner with the development and education of Generation Z nurses. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(4):160-162.].


Subject(s)
Education, Professional , Nurse Practitioners , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Hope , Humans
20.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(3): 130-135, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102580

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has highlighted the need for universal palliative care access. Nurses require palliative care education throughout the trajectory of professional training to effectively achieve this vision. METHOD: Review of the National Consensus Project Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care and use of educational exemplars highlight opportunities for improving palliative nursing education in academic and clinical settings. RESULTS: Consistently applying palliative care principles affects nursing outcomes across myriad domains of person-centered services. All nurses are responsible for delivering primary palliative care, but they cannot practice what they do not know. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Project offers evidence-based education for nursing students and practicing nurses nationally and globally. CONCLUSION: Equipping both nurses and nursing students with palliative care education is critical to improve the overall quality of health care throughout the continuum during COVID-19 and in the face of future health crises. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(3):130-135.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Global Health , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing/education , Palliative Care/standards , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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