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3.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 121, 2021 10 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The annual recruitment of new graduate nurses and midwives is key to recruiting large numbers of staff with the right attitude, skills and knowledge who are the best fit for the organisation. Virtual interviews were undertaken in 2020 due to the surge worldwide in the COVID-19 crisis. This study evaluates those virtual interviews and explores the sustainability of the model. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted at a large health organisation in New South Wales, Australia. Data were collected over 3 weeks using two online surveys, one for interviewees (n = 512) and the other for interviewers (n = 68). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and frequency distributions, and additional free-text comments were analysed using content analysis. RESULTS: Response rates were 55% (n = 280) interviewees and 54% (n = 37) for interviewers. The majority of interviewees (58%, n = 184) and interviewers (78%, n = 29) stated the interview was seamless or very seamless and 55% (n = 156) of interviewees and 73% (n = 27) of interviewers agreed interviewees conveyed themselves well during interviews. Over half of interviewees (65%, n = 182) and interviewers (51%, n = 18) agreed the virtual interview was fair or very fair for interviewee performance, regardless of age, race, or socio-economic status. However, many expressed a need for better internet access, equipment, and support, and a longer interview time to personally connect. Both new graduate interviewees (60%) and interviewers (75%) agreed virtual interviews are a suitable model for future use. However, some respondents indicated they preferred face-to-face interviews. CONCLUSIONS: The use of virtual interviews to select new graduates is considered acceptable, cost-effective and sustainable, as well as fair by the majority of participants. Study findings inform policy development, future planning, support the use of flexible selection practices and provide other health care professionals with a virtual recruitment model to consider when developing strategies to grow their future health workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Midwifery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(4): 356-358, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440874

ABSTRACT

The discipline of nursing is at a crossroads following the pandemic as scores of both budding and seasoned scholars and practitioners have left the discipline of nursing. Lower numbers of experienced nurses are entering into doctoral programs of nursing, especially PhD programs. A mentoring model is needed to guide and retain budding scholars of the discipline. The author of this article presents the humanbecoming mentorship model. It will be used to illustrate ethical straight-thinking implications for the future of the discipline of nursing.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Ethics, Nursing , Mentoring , Humanism , Humans , Mentors , Morals
5.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
6.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(8): 392-396, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic requires an accessible, practice-ready nursing workforce to assist with the increase in health service delivery. Graduate nurse transition programs are the entry point for most graduates into professional practice, and this review focused on both empirical studies and gray literature to identify at what point practice readiness occurs and what can assist graduate nurses' transition to become practice ready. METHOD: A scoping review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review framework. RESULTS: Consensus purports supportive environments, ideally in formal structured graduate transition to practice programs, to enhance graduate nurses' clinical skills and confidence development. With nursing confidence and competence gained through professional practice experience, it is apparent that for a sustainable nursing workforce, greater access for graduating nurses to transition programs is imperative. CONCLUSION: Recommendations include restructuring transition programs with possible time reductions, limited rotations, comprehensive orientations inclusive of preceptorship, and dedicated educators to increase and enhance supportive graduate nurse transitions. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(8):392-396.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Inservice Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics
7.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(8): 367-374, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The nursing shortage has been deemed a public health crisis as the turnover rate of newly licensed graduate nurses (NLGNs) continues to grow. One of five NLGNs are leaving the profession due to work dissatisfaction and feelings of inadequacy, risking patient safety. METHOD: A prospective, randomized controlled trial evaluated the impact of a 6-week digital intervention (text messaging) on NLGNs' self-reported stress, resiliency, sense of support, and intention to leave their jobs, organization, and profession. Messages to the experimental group (n = 10) conveyed emotional, esteem, and networking support, and messages to the control group (n = 11) were medical facts. RESULTS: The digital intervention in the form of medical facts increased the control group's sense of social support. Stress, resilience, and intention to leave their jobs, organizations, or profession did not change for either the control or experimental group. CONCLUSION: A digital intervention, such as text messaging, potentially can increase NLGNs' sense of support during their first year of hire. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(8):367-374.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Licensure, Nursing , Nurses , Text Messaging , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Licensure, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Evaluation Research , Occupational Stress/psychology , Personnel Turnover , Prospective Studies , Resilience, Psychological , Social Support
8.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): E79-E83, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The need for faculty to educate prospective nurses is urgent: without sufficient nursing faculty, schools regularly reject qualified applicants, despite an increasing need for nurses. At the same time, many graduate-prepared nurses lack preparation in teaching and pedagogical frameworks. PROBLEM: Literature on how PhD programs in nursing prepare graduates for teaching indicates that there is typically more emphasis on research than pedagogical learning. APPROACH: With the shift to remote learning under the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of California Irvine created a Graduate Fellows program to provide support to faculty while offering graduate students education in pedagogy and remote learning. OUTCOMES: Fellows were satisfied and reported increased understanding of challenges in teaching and increasing comfort with nurse faculty roles. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative efforts of fellows and faculty provided important resources at a critical time, and insights gained can inform similar projects in nursing faculty development.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing , Teaching , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing/supply & distribution , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching/education
10.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(7): 313-318, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295974

ABSTRACT

Productive scholarly writing is important for succeeding in graduate nursing programs such as thesis-and practice-based master's or doctoral degrees. Nurses pursuing graduate-level programs are expected to produce high-level scholarly writing manuscripts. However, writing typically is an independent and isolating endeavor. This article describes a student-led writing group ("Sit Down & Write!") that was adapted from the "Shut Up & Write!" (SUAW) structure. Five strategies were incorporated to meet the unique needs of graduate nursing students and foster productivity: (a) provide space for diverse groups of nursing students to participate, (b) offer flexible scheduling, (c) accommodate a flexible group structure, (d) host longer sessions, and (e) allow time to discuss writing goals. Overall, Sit Down and Write! provided a community of productive writing support. Future adaptations may consider providing a virtual option so sessions are accessible to students who are unable to join in-person. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(7):313-318.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Writing
11.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(5): 780-782, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275610

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare professionals and academic facilities are called to provide leadership in disseminating accurate and timely information through approaches that meet the needs of the public. Graduate students from a university in Taiwan collaborated with experts to provide interactive live broadcasting sessions on the COVID-related topics to the public through the Facebook platform. The broadcasting sessions also trained the students to communicate COVID-related information through succinct and interactive presentations. Twelve broadcasting sessions were conducted twice a week for three weeks in May 2020. Upon completion of the broadcasting sessions, students demonstrated growth in professional confidence, assessment of the public's knowledge gaps and needs, and preparation and delivery of professional live broadcasts. We recommend creating a live broadcast training application through an artificial intelligence (AI) expert system. Multidisciplinary academic-practice collaboration in preparing for the broadcasting and engaging in dialogues with the public is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Empowerment , Health Education/organization & administration , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Taiwan
12.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
13.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(4): 192-197, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This article describes findings from a Phase 1 investigation exploring the influence of Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses in West Texas. METHOD: Following a focus group session with eight practicing DNPs, the focus group shared how their roles effected safer health care. RESULTS: Final takeaways included their commitment to safer health care and prevention, moving care to the community, and a wish for more variety in projects generated in workplaces. Three themes emerged from the data: DNP leadership practice affects health outcomes through improved quality of care, influence, and innovation; DNP strengths include communication, leadership, and ability to change others' thinking; and the influence of DNP-prepared leaders at all external levels occurs through both increasing awareness of the role and influencing in multiple areas. DNP challenges include lack of understanding by others of the role and the lack of recognition and respect for their educational preparation. CONCLUSION: Leading, innovating, and communicating during constantly changing care models are key skills needed during the current health care crisis. These skills are basic to DNP practice. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(4):192-197.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Leadership , Texas
14.
Dimens Crit Care Nurs ; 40(3): 149-155, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Advanced and continuing education is essential for maintaining competence. Graduate students have shown an increase in online course enrollment, and similar trends are anticipated among nurses with limited access to on-site education due to the current COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. Faculty must utilize preferred teaching/learning strategies to provide high-quality online education courses that engage learners and improve outcomes. OBJECTIVES: This study assessed preferred teaching/learning strategies for graduate students enrolled in at least 1 asynchronous nursing course. Correlational data assessed the relationship between preferred teaching/learning strategies and selected demographic information. METHODS: All graduate nursing students enrolled in at least 1 asynchronous course at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing during a 3-month period were invited to participate in a survey to assess preferred teaching/learning methods. RESULTS: Sixty-six graduate students completed the survey. Most participants were comfortable with computer skills, had previously enrolled in a web-enhanced course, and did not enjoy group work. Preferred teaching/learning strategies included voice-over PowerPoints, simulation, case studies, guest speakers, and faculty communication. CONCLUSION: Preferred teaching/learning strategies that incorporate asynchronous and synchronous learning should be developed. These strategies will enhance the knowledge base of nurses in all settings and populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing/psychology , Humans , Learning , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 215-220, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of stress, anxiety, and depression are common symptoms in graduate students pursuing a degree in the health care professions. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic likely complicated these existing issues. PURPOSE: To confirm this hypothesis, researchers created a survey to examine the experiences of graduate nursing students during COVID-19. METHODS: Graduate nursing students (n = 222) completed the survey, which included 2 instruments: the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Impact of Events Scale (IES-R). RESULTS: Nearly 25% of students expressed moderate to extremely severe levels of negative emotional states on the DASS-21, and 23.8% of students scored within the area of clinical concern for the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder on the IES-R. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding levels of mental health and associated factors that may contribute to changes can assist administration, faculty, and staff in targeting resources and interventions to support graduate nursing students to continue their education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Mental Disorders , Pandemics , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Surveys , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Nursing Education Research , Students, Nursing/psychology
17.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(3): 120-122, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121657

ABSTRACT

In recognition of the Year of the Nurse and Midwife, the 2020 annual conference of the Association for Leadership Science in Nursing (ALSN) celebrated A Look Back to Move Forward in recognition of the 50th anniversary of ALSN. The ALSN began as the Council of Graduate Education for Administrative Nursing (CGEAN) in 1970. Today, ALSN maintains the goals of shaping graduate education and research to inform nursing leadership practice.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Education, Nursing, Graduate/history , Education, Nursing, Graduate/trends , Leadership , Nurse Administrators/education , Nurse Administrators/history , Nursing Staff/education , Adult , Female , Forecasting , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
18.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(3): 123-129, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102579

ABSTRACT

Students implementing journal clubs can meet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) essential skills by developing analytical methods to critically appraise the evidence. The objective of this article is to inform DNP faculty and students on the value of journal clubs in doctoral nursing education. This article includes a reflection on a DNP student's experience implementing a journal club as an exemplar. The approaches used involved a literature review on the benefits of a journal club for nurses and a reflection on the experience of implementing a journal club. The journal club experience met the guidelines for two American Association of Colleges of Nursing DNP essential skills. A journal club is an effective way to meet DNP essential skills in nursing students and is possible to implement in an online format, which is an attractive clinical option during COVID-19. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(3):123-129.].


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Periodicals as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Evidence-Based Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
20.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(2): 97-99, 2021 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075657

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The year 2020 was one of tremendous challenge and change for our communities and our profession. As the next decade unfolds, the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) will be required for entry to practice as a nurse practitioner (NP), and we will all continue to recover individually and as a nation from the experiences of the year 2020. Doctor of nursing practice-prepared NPs need to be equipped to take the lead in post-COVID recovery and the challenges the US health care system faces through an increased emphasis on curricula and clinical experiences focused on health disparities, community health, and health promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Nurse Practitioners/education , Nurse Practitioners/standards , Nursing Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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