Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
2.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(8): 392-396, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic requires an accessible, practice-ready nursing workforce to assist with the increase in health service delivery. Graduate nurse transition programs are the entry point for most graduates into professional practice, and this review focused on both empirical studies and gray literature to identify at what point practice readiness occurs and what can assist graduate nurses' transition to become practice ready. METHOD: A scoping review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review framework. RESULTS: Consensus purports supportive environments, ideally in formal structured graduate transition to practice programs, to enhance graduate nurses' clinical skills and confidence development. With nursing confidence and competence gained through professional practice experience, it is apparent that for a sustainable nursing workforce, greater access for graduating nurses to transition programs is imperative. CONCLUSION: Recommendations include restructuring transition programs with possible time reductions, limited rotations, comprehensive orientations inclusive of preceptorship, and dedicated educators to increase and enhance supportive graduate nurse transitions. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(8):392-396.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Inservice Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics
3.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): E79-E83, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The need for faculty to educate prospective nurses is urgent: without sufficient nursing faculty, schools regularly reject qualified applicants, despite an increasing need for nurses. At the same time, many graduate-prepared nurses lack preparation in teaching and pedagogical frameworks. PROBLEM: Literature on how PhD programs in nursing prepare graduates for teaching indicates that there is typically more emphasis on research than pedagogical learning. APPROACH: With the shift to remote learning under the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of California Irvine created a Graduate Fellows program to provide support to faculty while offering graduate students education in pedagogy and remote learning. OUTCOMES: Fellows were satisfied and reported increased understanding of challenges in teaching and increasing comfort with nurse faculty roles. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative efforts of fellows and faculty provided important resources at a critical time, and insights gained can inform similar projects in nursing faculty development.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing , Teaching , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing/supply & distribution , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching/education
4.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
7.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(2): 97-99, 2021 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075657

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The year 2020 was one of tremendous challenge and change for our communities and our profession. As the next decade unfolds, the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) will be required for entry to practice as a nurse practitioner (NP), and we will all continue to recover individually and as a nation from the experiences of the year 2020. Doctor of nursing practice-prepared NPs need to be equipped to take the lead in post-COVID recovery and the challenges the US health care system faces through an increased emphasis on curricula and clinical experiences focused on health disparities, community health, and health promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Nurse Practitioners/education , Nurse Practitioners/standards , Nursing Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
8.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(12): 692-696, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner program at The Ohio State University transitioned from a traditional face-to-face program to a distance-enhanced hybrid model providing course content online with campus visits for procedural skills and simulation in 2017. Although the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic necessitated cancellation of all in-person events across the university, the neonatal nurse practitioner students' learning needs remained the same. METHOD: The onsite experience was redesigned for virtual delivery. Procedural content was accomplished through student-led small-group collaborative critical thinking activities surrounding procedural complications, and other faculty-led scenario discussions. RESULTS: Students collaborated for a Complications Rounds activity (1-day) that promoted learning about procedural skills from a global perspective including safe techniques, monitoring, risks, and troubleshooting complications. CONCLUSION: Procedural content can be achieved when in-person learning is not possible. The Complications Rounds approach can mitigate delays or gaps in practical experiences. Examining complications in-depth increases preparedness, promoting greater awareness of harm prevention when these present in future practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(12):692-696.].


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Neonatal Nursing/education , Nurse Practitioners/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Ohio/epidemiology , Pandemics , Schools, Nursing
10.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(11): 1030-1034, 2020 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841975

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Telehealth training was important for nurse practitioner (NP) students prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, but now it is essential. Training in telehealth allows access to health care for vulnerable populations in rural health areas and beyond. As the future of health care delivery changes, providers will be required to use this technology. Therefore, it is imperative that such training become part of NP education to prepare students to be technologically competent providers in the 21st century. The objective of this educational pilot project was to educate Doctor of Nursing Practice nurse practitioner students to conduct patient interviews and provide interprofessional collaboration using telehealth. The project addressed a gap in the literature on planning for simulations from varying NP specialties and provided feedback from standardized patients on their experiences. A total of 83 students from four specialty tracks received telehealth education. Students then interviewed simulated patients and provided a collaborating report. The students and patients were asked to complete questionnaires to assess the modules and the experience itself. Quantitative descriptive data were gathered, and qualitative themes were obtained from open-ended questions. Both the students and simulated patients indicated that they appreciated the ease and convenience of interviewing patients through technology. Both struggled with issues related to the technology and the need to have backup systems available. The students demonstrated that they were very capable of using telehealth and were generally very positive about the experience.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurse Practitioners , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurse Practitioners/education , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Students, Nursing/psychology
11.
Nurs Outlook ; 68(4): 494-503, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) called for all nursing schools to phase out master's-level preparation for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and transition to doctor of nursing practice (DNP) preparation only by 2015. Today, five years after the AACN's deadline, nursing has not yet adopted a universal DNP standard for APRN practice entry. PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing the ability of nursing schools to implement a universal DNP standard for APRNs. METHODS: Deans from top-ranked nursing schools explore the current state of the DNP degree in the US. The authors draw upon their collective experience as national leaders in academic nursing, long-time influencers on this debate, and heads of DNP programs themselves. This insight is combined with a synthesis of the literature and analysis of previously unpublished data from the AACN on trends in nursing doctoral education. FINDINGS: This paper highlights issues such as the long history of inconsistency (in messaging, curricula, etc.) surrounding the DNP, certification and accreditation challenges, cost barriers, and more. The authors apply COVID-19 as a case study to help place DNP graduates within a real-world context for health system stakeholders whose buy-in is essential for the success of this professional transition. DISCUSSION: This paper describes the DNP's standing in today's professional environment and advances the conversation on key barriers to its adoption. Insights are shared regarding critical next steps to ensure national acceptance of the DNP as nursing's terminal practice degree.


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing/education , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Graduate/standards , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Curriculum , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Societies, Nursing , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...