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1.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(6): 296-302, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Trauma-informed education provides a framework for a collaborative, relational trauma awareness model when working with nursing students. This concept analysis provides clarification, explicates the conceptual meaning of trauma-informed education, and lays a foundation for nurse educators navigating the challenge of meeting student needs during and after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHOD: Using Walker and Avant's concept analysis method, exhaustive multi-disciplinary and ancestry searches conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsychINFO identified 31 relevant article that were evaluated for relevance to the concept analysis as it relates to the context of nursing education. RESULTS: This analysis proposes a new definition of trauma-informed education to support future practice and research endeavors, providing a framework for transforming the nurse educator-student dyadic relationship. CONCLUSION: Trauma-informed education can provide a collaborative relational model with students based on trauma awareness as affecting one's being and self. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(6):296-302.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Concept Formation , Curriculum , Education, Nursing/methods , Faculty, Nursing , Humans
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 375, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated rapid changes in medical education to protect students and patients from the risk of infection. Virtual Patient Simulators (VPS) provide a simulated clinical environment in which students can interview and examine a patient, order tests and exams, prioritize interventions, and observe response to therapy, all with minimal risk to themselves and their patients. Like high-fidelity simulators (HFS), VPS are a tool to improve curricular integration. Unlike HFS, VPS require limited infrastructure investment and can be used in low-resource settings. Few studies have examined the impact of VPS training on clinical education. This international, multicenter cohort study was designed to assess the impact of small-group VPS training on individual learning process and curricular integration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. METHODS: We conducted a multi-centre, international cohort study of nursing and medical students. Baseline perceptions of individual learning process and curricular integration were assessed using a 27-item pre-session questionnaire. Students subsequently participated in small-group VPS training sessions lead by a clinical tutor and then completed a 32-item post-session questionnaire, including 25 paired items. Pre- and post-session responses were compared to determine the impact of the small-group VPS experience. RESULTS: Participants included 617 nursing and medical students from 11 institutions in 8 countries. At baseline, nursing students reported greater curricular integration and more clinical and simulation experience than did medical students. After exposure to small-group VPS training, participants reported significant improvements in 5/6 items relating to individual learning process and 7/7 items relating to curricular integration. The impact of the VPS experience was similar amongst nursing and medical students. CONCLUSIONS: In this multi-centre study, perceptions of individual learning process and curricular integration improved after exposure to small-group VPS training. Nursing and medical students showed similar impact. Small-group VPS training is an accessible, low-risk educational strategy that can improve student perceptions of individual learning process and curricular integration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Patient Simulation , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Virtual Reality , Clinical Competence , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pandemics
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263388, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793530

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, universities immediately responded to protect students' lives by implementing e-learning in order to stop the spread of the communicable disease within the academic population. This study aimed to describe iranian nursing students' experiences of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The current study used a qualitative descriptive study. Ten nursing undergraduate students from a single Iranian university identified using purposive sampling methods. Face-to-face semi-structured interview conducted from May to July 2021 and analyzed through thematic analysis. Lincoln and Goba criteria were used to obtain data validity and reliability. RESULTS: Four themes emerged including"novelty of e-learning","advantages of e-learning", "disadvantages of e-learning"and"passage of time and the desire to return to face education". Participants evaluated e-learning as a novel method without proper infrastructure, it was initially confusing but became the new normal as their knowledge of the way to use it improved. Advantages included self-centered flexible learning and reduction in their concerns experienced with face-to-face learning. Disadvantages including changing the way they interact with teachers, decreasing interactions with classmates, problems with education files, superficial learning, hardware problems, family members' perceptions of the student role, interference of home affairs with e-learning, cheating on exams and assignments and being far away from the clinical context. CONCLUSION: The findings revealed that e-learning has been introduced as a new method for the current research participants and despite the perceived benefits, these students believed that e-learning could supplement face education but not replace it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Nursing/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Iran , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Universities
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776202

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus pandemic has dramatically affected how nursing students are educated. Distance learning has become the norm, and an evaluation of learning achievement is needed. This is a mixed-method study of teaching presence, self-regulated learning, and learning satisfaction in distance learning to evaluate the learning achievement of students in a nursing education program. Ninety-four students for quantitative and seven students for qualitative research were sampled. All the sampled students attend the nursing education program in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province and were enrolled during the first semester of 2020. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS/WIN 21.0, and qualitative data were analyzed via content analysis in NVivo 12. Teaching presence and self-regulated learning were identified as the factors affecting learning satisfaction. In a focus group interview, teaching presence increased when the students received feedback and saw the faces of their professors. Self-regulated learning occurred when they had opportunities to practice self-study and leadership and when they formed relationships between professors and colleagues. These methods have also been recognized to increase learning satisfaction. Considering the results of this study, it is necessary to develop teaching methods that enhance the learning satisfaction of students in distance learning nursing education programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Teaching
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 845588, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776055

ABSTRACT

Background: At the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, there was a lack of sufficient nursing experience for pneumonia caused by COVID-19. All nursing decisions had to be innovatively made and measures taken by nurses using their existing knowledge and skills. This required nurses to have a solid theoretical understanding of infectious diseases and epidemiology, evidence-based solid practice skills, and problem-solving skills. The COVID outbreak reminded undergraduates to master relevant knowledge and abilities during school study. Methods: Qualitative research on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of the COVID-19 epidemic was conducted using semi-structured interviews among sophomore nursing students in the university. Based on the characteristics of the KAP of nursing students, we analyzed the deficiencies of the knowledge and ability to deal with large-scale public health emergencies in the second-year nursing education. Results: A total of 12 subject headings and 41 sublevel headings were identified from three aspects of KAP. The subject headings included knowledge aspect (the origin of the disease, the route of transmission, main symptoms, the epidemiological characteristics of the disease, scientific cognition of information sources), attitude aspect (different emotional experiences, a certain degree of influence, different views on the development trend of the epidemic, support the government's prevention and control strategies), and behavior aspect (do an excellent job in self-protection, help family members to protect, and participate in social anti-epidemic actions). According to this analysis, second-year nursing students have three deficiencies in dealing with large-scale public health emergencies: knowledge of infectious diseases and epidemiology, evidence-based practice skills, and problem- solving ability. Conclusion: When students start nursing professional courses, the knowledge of infectious diseases and epidemiology, training of evidence-based practice skills, and problem-solving ability should be strengthened to improve the ability of nursing undergraduates to respond to large-scale public health emergencies after entering the workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Education, Nursing/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Qualitative Research
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690244

ABSTRACT

The disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus led to the disruption of normality with respect to education, public healthcare and new technologies. Education is a fundamental pillar to increase the knowledge and morale of people. However, due to the lockdown implemented to protect the population from an infection of unknown aetiology, the education system decided to switch from face-to-face education to virtual education. This modality has affected the teaching-learning process in the Degree of Nursing, since its competencies and knowledge demand in-presence learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact that telematic education had on students of the Degree of Nursing who were studying in the final year of said degree, which involves their imminent entry into the labour market. We used the client satisfaction questionnaire of Bob Hayes to gather data and analyse the satisfaction level of the nursing students. As a result, a considerable amount of information was obtained about teaching, which shows the absence of practical activities and the lack of information about safety and protection measures related to the pandemic. Most educators themselves were struggling to understand the implications of the virus and implement appropriate safety measures, since there was quite a bit of conflicting information relating to the effectiveness of personal protective safety equipment and the lifespan of the virus on various media outside of the host. It is, therefore, not surprising that education for students in this regard was lacking. In general, most of the students showed dissatisfaction with the virtual education they received.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Nursing/methods , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Rev. baiana enferm ; 34: e36929, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1328335

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: refletir sobre o emprego da educação a distância na graduação em enfermagem no Brasil no cenário da pandemia da COVID-19. Método: ensaio crítico por meio de reflexões ancoradas na literatura acerca da utilização da educação a distância na formação de enfermeiros(as) e dos circunscritores decorrentes da pandemia. Resultados: as discussões sobre o emprego da educação a distância na formação em enfermagem no Brasil respondem a diferentes interesses educacionais, profissionais, políticos e econômicos. No contexto da pandemia de COVID-19, a partir de 2020, tais debates têm sido potencializados em função do emprego de metodologias da educação a distância na continuidade de muitos cursos de formação, outrora exclusivamente presenciais. Conclusão: não obstante as metodologias próprias da educação a distância permitirem, em um primeiro momento, a continuidade dos processos formativos em enfermagem, reafirma-se que o ensino-aprendizagem para o cuidado em saúde demanda proximidade e contato.


Objetivo: reflexionar sobre el uso de la educación a distancia en programas de graduación en enfermería en Brasil en el escenario de la pandemia COVID-19. Método: ensayo crítico a través de reflexiones ancladas en la literatura sobre el uso de la educación a distancia en la formación de enfermeras y circunscriptores resultantes de la pandemia. Resultados: los debates sobre el uso de la educación a distancia en la educación en enfermería en Brasil responden a diferentes intereses educativos, profesionales, políticos y económicos. En el contexto de la pandemia COVID-19, desde 2020, estos debates se han intensificado debido al uso de metodologías de educación a distancia en la continuidad de muchos cursos de formación, una vez exclusivamente presenciales. Conclusión: aunque las metodologías de la educación a distancia permiten, al principio, la continuidad de los procesos formativos en enfermería, se reafirma que la enseñanza-aprendizaje para la atención de la salud exige proximidad y contacto.


Objective: to reflect on the use of distance learning in nursing graduate programs in Brazil in the scenario of the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: critical essay through reflections anchored in the literature about the use of distance learning in the training of nurses and circumscriptors resulting from the pandemic. Results: discussions on the use of distance learning in nursing education in Brazil respond to different educational, professional, political and economic interests. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, since 2020, such debates have been intensified due to the use of distance learning methodologies in the continuity of many training courses, once exclusively in person. Conclusion: although the methodologies of distance learning allow, at first, the continuity of the training processes in nursing, it is reaffirmed that teaching-learning for health care demands proximity and contact.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing/methods , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Teaching/trends , Brazil , Health Human Resource Training , Nurse-Patient Relations
8.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 293-297, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A university school of nursing initiated a pilot project to include Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) students in two existing Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) student scenarios. The result was a valuable collaboration among the student learners. METHOD: Using a Zoom platform, students were introduced to their patient in a telehealth scenario. Students then encountered the same patient in an urgent care setting. The BSN student assessed the patient, then reported to the MSN student. The MSN student provided feedback and treatment orders. Individual BSN and MSN student pairs debriefed immediately after their scenarios and again at the end with other students and faculty. RESULTS: Evaluation was conducted using an adaptation of the Modified Simulation Evaluation Tool (SET-M) and free-text questions developed by nursing faculty. Both SET-M responses and written comments indicated students were satisfied with the simulation experience, and students' confidence and skills in communication and collaboration improved. CONCLUSION: This simulation was beneficial for both MSN and BSN students and will become an ongoing addition to the simulations. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):293-297.].


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Education, Nursing , Simulation Training , Students, Nursing , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pilot Projects , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration
9.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 259-264, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Students who are more satisfied and engaged in online courses have better learning experiences and outcomes. METHOD: Survey data were collected during a 4-month period in 2019. The research team created a survey to collect demographic information and assess student satisfaction. Student engagement was measured using the 19-item Online Student Engagement Scale. RESULTS: Overall student engagement and satisfaction scores in online programs were moderately high. Generation Z participants and students from PhD programs were the most satisfied and engaged in their programs. CONCLUSION: Students who are more engaged in online coursework are more satisfied and thus are more likely to remain and successfully complete their respective programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):259-264.].


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Personal Satisfaction , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/standards , Humans , Learning , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200248, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243894

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To discuss remote activities in nursing education in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic for strengthening nursing from the perspective of the "Nursing Now" campaign. METHOD: Theoretical-reflective study based on literature and critical analysis. DISCUSSION: Reflection about the measures to control the COVID-19 pandemic and suspend in-person classes, the adoption of alternative forms of teaching, especially online ones, and their repercussions on nursing teaching strategies. There were difficulties regarding the quality of education, unequal access, and lack of knowledge from professors. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: The negative impact that emergency distance teaching had on the education of nurses stands out, in contrast to the world movement for the valuing of nurses. The legacy of this crisis must be taken advantage of through the better use of technological resources and their incorporation in teaching, having as a certainty that the distance teaching model does not encompass the totality of nursing education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing/methods , Pandemics , Teaching , Brazil , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/legislation & jurisprudence , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Physical Distancing
11.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 64, 2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic posed a huge challenge to the education systems worldwide, forcing many countries to provisionally close educational institutions and deliver courses fully online. The aim of this study was to explore the quality of the online education in China for international medical and nursing students from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as well as the factors that influenced their satisfaction with online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Questionnaires were developed and administered to 316 international medical and nursing students and 120 teachers at a university in China. The Chi-square test was used to detect the influence of participants' personal characteristics on their satisfaction with online education. The Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum test was employed to identify the negative and positive factors influencing the online education satisfaction. A binary logistic regression model was performed for multiple-factor analysis to determine the association of the different categories of influential factors-crisis-, learner-, instructor-, and course-related categories, with the online education satisfaction. RESULTS: Overall, 230 students (response rate 72.8%) and 95 teachers (response rate 79.2%) completed the survey. It was found that 36.5% of students and 61.1% of teachers were satisfied with the online education. Teachers' professional title, students' year of study, continent of origin and location of current residence significantly influenced the online education satisfaction. The most influential barrier for students was the severity of the COVID-19 situation and for teachers it was the sense of distance. The most influential facilitating factor for students was a well-accomplished course assignment and for teachers it was the successful administration of the online courses. CONCLUSIONS: Several key factors have been identified that affected the attitudes of international health science students from LMICs and their teachers towards online education in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. To improve the online education outcome, medical schools are advised to promote the facilitating factors and cope with the barriers, by providing support for students and teaching faculties to deal with the anxiety caused by the pandemic, caring for the state of mind of in-China students away from home, maintaining the engagement of out-China students studying from afar and enhancing collaborations with overseas institutions to create practice opportunities at students' local places.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Faculty , Students , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Developing Countries , Faculty, Medical , Faculty, Nursing , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Nurses , Pandemics , Physicians , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Young Adult
12.
Australas Emerg Care ; 24(4): 314-318, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online learning emerged as an auxiliary approach in 2013 when MOOCs were imported and popularized in Chinese universities, particularly in the duration of pandemic outbreaks worldwide. World health organization (WHO) had recommended online education to keep social distance which still needs further evaluation. This study aimed to examine whether an open online course is superior to conventional education in emergency nursing during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Two groups of conventional education students (CG) and two groups of students participating in an online course that utilized an application (called SuperStar) as the SuperStar Group (SSG) were studied to compare their abilities in the process of new knowledge acquisition. The SSG was divided into a blended group (S1) and an online group (S2). The emergency nursing course was scheduled in 16 independent classes, which contained stochastic tests at least eight times. RESULTS: The CG group showed better performance on the final exam than the SSG group, but there was no statistically significant difference. The CG group obtained better scores on the memory capacity tests while the SSG had better scores on the application capacity tests. The SSG group scored higher on the later tests during the process of education compared to the CG group. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehension of an emergency nursing course was stronger in the SSG group than in the CG group. Horizontal comparison of subentry tests discriminated between the groups, with a better trend for the SSG group in application ability. There are potential effects on chronological learning through the use of the online course for emergency nursing education, not only during COVID-19 but also in the post-pandemic era.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing/methods , Emergency Nursing/education , COVID-19 , China , Educational Measurement , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Students, Nursing
14.
Curationis ; 44(1): e1-e7, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The real-world problems and ever-changing challenges currently confronting the future of nursing education and healthcare require a problem-based learning approach using simulation strategy. This is exacerbated by the increasing burden of diseases such as tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV and AIDS) and more recently the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, as well as advancing technology and changing regulations and policies. Problem-based learning is a student-centred learning strategy, where students are presented with situations drawn from practice, which can be used to bridge the theory-practice gap. OBJECTIVES: To explore the perceptions and views of healthcare educators on how problem-based learning can be facilitated through simulation. METHOD: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Thirteen educators from the Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of Johannesburg, with 5 years' teaching experience, were purposively selected from the Dean's office, the Nursing Department, emergency medical care and the departments of podiatry, somatology and radiography. The participants were selected based on their extensive knowledge of problem-based learning and the use of simulation. Data were collected through in-depth, individual, semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis provided six themes and 13 related sub-themes. The article focuses on the perceptions and views of educators regarding problem-based learning through simulation. RESULTS: Problem-based learning through simulation allows students to work together in teams, which demonstrates a new modus operandi and renders a holistic approach to patient care. CONCLUSION: Problem-based learning through simulation should be utilised to encourage reflective knowledge exchange. Students from various departments can learn about new innovations, creativity and develop critical thinking when solving complex health-related problems.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Faculty, Nursing/psychology , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Adult , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Young Adult
16.
Nurs Forum ; 56(2): 439-443, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066744

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 emerged in Wuhan, China, and began its worldwide journey. As the severity of the virus became known, the Chinese National Government mobilized resources, and their centralized management was critical to the containment of the epidemic. Healthcare agencies and providers were overwhelmed with patients, many of whom were critically ill and died. Nurses adapted to the work using personal protective equipment, but its initial scarcity contributed to stressful working conditions. Nurses in the United States can take several lessons from the experiences of their Chinese nurse colleagues, including the benefit of centralized management of the epidemic, the need for specialized treatment facilities, and the importance of a national stockpile of critical equipment and supplies. A fully funded United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of Pandemics and Emerging Threats is necessary. A nursing department within the office and a national mobilization plan to send nurses to support local efforts during a pandemic or other threat are likewise essential. Continuous training for nurses, especially caring for patients with infectious diseases in intensive care units, stress management, and how to comfort the dying, are also useful lessons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/methods , China , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/trends , Education, Nursing/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , United States
20.
J Prof Nurs ; 37(2): 255-260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989039

ABSTRACT

Unprecedented financial and logistical barriers in educating nurses during COVID-19 have threatened nursing education. The purpose of this article is to provide a template to facilitate the maintenance and stability of teaching and learning in a pandemic environment for nursing school administration and faculty leaders. The National Incident Management System (NIMS), previously used in training nurses for emergency preparation and response, has been applied as a guiding framework. The framework consists of five elements: Preparedness, Communication/Information Management, Resource Management, Command and Ongoing Management/Maintenance. This paper addresses how schools of nursing may apply each of these elements to address both the needs of the institution and community. The Comprehensive Vulnerability Management paradigm is further offered as a lens for professional development. Free preparedness education is showcased from leading nursing and healthcare professional and government organizations. Finally, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies are used for integrating NIMS and social dimensions of disaster. Such tools may equip academic leaders at schools of nursing to surmount challenges posed by the pandemic, and to ensure educational readiness to respond to global health crisis through use of the NIMS framework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Professional/methods , Nurses/psychology , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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