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1.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 39-44, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522339

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many health care facilities closed their doors to nursing students, depriving them of the experience of caring for patients, a foundation of nursing education. The purpose of this article is to report on how the National Council of State Boards of Nursing convened nurse leaders from around the country to explore this problem and develop possible solutions.Coming together virtually, these leaders recommended a national model, the practice-academic partnership, to provide nursing students with in-person clinical experiences during the pandemic. This model is unique in its recognition of the important role of nursing regulatory bodies in these partnerships. The practice-academic partnership model creates clinical education opportunities for students during a public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the model could be applied to meet the chronic challenges nursing education programs have often faced in securing clinical sites, even in the absence of a global or national public health emergency. We provide the context in which the practice-academic partnership model was developed, along with keys to its successful implementation and suggestions for its evaluation. We also discuss the implications of using this model once the pandemic ends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Health Facilities , Interinstitutional Relations , Schools, Nursing , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Students, Nursing
4.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 293-297, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A university school of nursing initiated a pilot project to include Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) students in two existing Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) student scenarios. The result was a valuable collaboration among the student learners. METHOD: Using a Zoom platform, students were introduced to their patient in a telehealth scenario. Students then encountered the same patient in an urgent care setting. The BSN student assessed the patient, then reported to the MSN student. The MSN student provided feedback and treatment orders. Individual BSN and MSN student pairs debriefed immediately after their scenarios and again at the end with other students and faculty. RESULTS: Evaluation was conducted using an adaptation of the Modified Simulation Evaluation Tool (SET-M) and free-text questions developed by nursing faculty. Both SET-M responses and written comments indicated students were satisfied with the simulation experience, and students' confidence and skills in communication and collaboration improved. CONCLUSION: This simulation was beneficial for both MSN and BSN students and will become an ongoing addition to the simulations. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):293-297.].


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Education, Nursing , Simulation Training , Students, Nursing , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pilot Projects , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration
5.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278225

ABSTRACT

Remote teaching (RT) was the only option left to educators to continue education with public policy of lockdowns and social distancing during COVID-19 pandemic. RT is the online mode of instructional delivery. Globally it has become mandatory for all nurse educators to switch to RT mode. Many factors have been identified for effective implementation of RT, of which the major elements are choice of online teaching mode, pedagogy to choose the platform or technology, faculty preparedness, and the learner motivation and expectations. The dire need to meet the educational objectives demanded sudden transition to online mode. The paradigm shifts to RT brought many challenges and pragmatic guidance for teachers and institutions Remote teaching is flexible, student centered and feasible with opportunities to develop technically empowered faculty and coherent digital education strategies. However, tackling threats like academic integrity, inequity in accessibility and limited faculty preparedness necessitates attention. RT being flexible tool is weakened by low self-motivated students and low connectivity with digital inequity and security issues. The challenges opened opportunity to enhance faculty technical competency and learning management system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Curriculum/standards , Humans
9.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(6): 346-351, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated sweeping changes in a neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) program's approach to distance-accessible learning. Prioritizing student learning and safety, we developed a new alternative model for individualized simulation. METHOD: The scenario created for a student to deliver an unexpected diagnosis of trisomy 21, or Down syndrome, to a postpartum mother was redesigned to take place using web-conference technology. RESULTS: We successfully transitioned the planned in-person individualized simulation for NNP students delivering an unexpected diagnosis to a web-conference environment and added nurse-midwifery (NM) students. CONCLUSION: This simulation presented an authentic clinical situation encountered in practice, supporting the specialty-specific competencies for the NNP, NM, and core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice. The web-conference platform is an effective strategy for simulation. Advanced practice nurses completing individualized simulation through technology are uniquely poised to leverage these skills as telemedicine increasingly influences their future clinical practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(6):346-351.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Interprofessional Education , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Learning , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology
10.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(5): 892-902, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a critical need to increase diversity in the nursing workforce to better address racial health disparities. PURPOSE: To provide academic institutions with practical recommendations to foster a collaborative environment and essential resources for and in support of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) scholars. METHODS: We examine the experiences of three Black nurse scholars, at a research-intensive university in an urban area during the COVID-19 pandemic and civil unrest in the United States. FINDINGS: Findings suggest barriers exist, which negatively impact workplace climate, collaboration and mentoring for BIPOC nursing scholars. Guided by a Black feminist perspective and utilizing existing literature, we recommend strategies to enhance workplace climate, to develop culturally aware collaboration, and to center mentoring as the foundation for BIPOC nurse scholar success. DISCUSSION: This article acknowledges that a crucial step in addressing health disparities is successful support of and collaboration with BIPOC nurse scholars.


Subject(s)
African Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/ethnology , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , Social Justice , African Americans/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feminism , Humans , Mentors , United States
11.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 907-912, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247272

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for public health nursing as an integral part of a strong public health workforce. However, it has also created challenges in preparing future nurses as much of nursing instruction, including clinical experiences, needed to urgently transition learning to a virtual environment. This paper describes the process faculty experienced during spring 2020 to quickly transition public health nursing clinicals from in-person to virtual learning in response to COVID-19. Further, faculty lessons learned are shared and include the importance of creating a supportive team dynamic, embracing innovation, continuing to engage with community partners, and adapting to meet emerging student needs during the evolving pandemic. The process and lessons learned may act as a guide for other nursing programs as we continue to navigate nursing education during this and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Faculty, Nursing , Public Health Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing/psychology , Humans , Public Health Nursing/education
12.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200248, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243894

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To discuss remote activities in nursing education in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic for strengthening nursing from the perspective of the "Nursing Now" campaign. METHOD: Theoretical-reflective study based on literature and critical analysis. DISCUSSION: Reflection about the measures to control the COVID-19 pandemic and suspend in-person classes, the adoption of alternative forms of teaching, especially online ones, and their repercussions on nursing teaching strategies. There were difficulties regarding the quality of education, unequal access, and lack of knowledge from professors. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: The negative impact that emergency distance teaching had on the education of nurses stands out, in contrast to the world movement for the valuing of nurses. The legacy of this crisis must be taken advantage of through the better use of technological resources and their incorporation in teaching, having as a certainty that the distance teaching model does not encompass the totality of nursing education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing/methods , Pandemics , Teaching , Brazil , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/legislation & jurisprudence , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Physical Distancing
13.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 298-300, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As COVID-19 forced in-person courses to transition online, an active learning course focused on design thinking in health and health care embraced the challenge. Lessons learned, mistakes made, and thoughts on the future of online education in nursing are discussed. METHOD: During the online transition, it was thought the flipped-classroom approach would transition well using the same design thinking methodology taught in the course. Because the course promoted rapid innovation and iteration, such a challenge served as a call to action, and the course became a valuable real-time case study. RESULTS: Based on student surveys, the overall quality of the transitioned course increased slightly compared with the previous semester's in-person course, indicating schools of nursing can innovate both the way students are taught as well as what students are taught. CONCLUSION: Rather than mourn the loss of in-person learning, the newfound possibilities of virtual education should celebrated. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):298-300.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Problem-Based Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Nurse Educ ; 46(2): E18-E22, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, education and learning processes have been shifted to a completely virtual, online format. Students' satisfaction has been linked to better learning outcomes. PURPOSE: The purpose was to determine factors associated with students' satisfaction with e-learning among Saudi nursing students. METHODS: A cross-sectional, correlational descriptive study was conducted among 139 nursing students from different nursing programs in Saudi Arabia using a self-reported online survey. RESULTS: Previous experience with and readiness for e-learning influenced students' overall satisfaction with e-learning and satisfaction with assessment. Only readiness for e-learning was associated with satisfaction with teaching and generic skills and learning experiences. CONCLUSIONS: This study may enhance faculty members' understandings of factors influencing students' satisfaction with e-learning. Therefore, the urgent national distance education plan may need further development to meet students' needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Personal Satisfaction , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Self Report , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data
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