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1.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 85(5): 8311, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350503

ABSTRACT

As a result of restrictions imposed by COVID-19, many researchers have responded to the call for remote, advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) that do not involve direct patient care. The influx of materials on online pedagogy may be difficult for new preceptors to digest while familiarizing themselves with the APPE program. To complement the available guidance on remote learning for new preceptors, we describe our experiences with implementing a remote, research-focused APPE during COVID-19. Common challenges are discussed and potential solutions that may help new preceptors anticipate and overcome barriers to achieving the educational outcomes of research-focused APPE are proposed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pharmacy Research/organization & administration , Preceptorship/organization & administration , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , Students, Pharmacy
3.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 70, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094365

ABSTRACT

The effort by countries and relevant stakeholders to improving the quality of pharmacy education globally is being countered by the outbreak of infectious diseases. In order to curtail the spread of the coronavirus, unprecedented measures such as total/partial lockdowns and ban on public gatherings have been put in place by several governments. These measures implemented have put a halt on academic activities and schooling and have invariably affected the delivery of pharmacy education globally and Africa is no exception. In order to ensure the continuity of pharmacy education, the e-learning strategy has been utilized by several countries in the world today and Africa should not be left out. There is an urgent need for Africa to meet up with the present education demands by adopting the e-learning strategy but this is not without challenges. We examine the impact of these measures on pharmacy education as well as the challenges affecting the uptake and applicability of the e-learning strategy in pharmacy education in Africa. It is therefore essential for the government and relevant stakeholders in the pharmacy education sector to address the numerous challenges that may hinder its uptake in Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Africa , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans
5.
J Pharm Pract ; 34(1): 7-10, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955405

ABSTRACT

In recent months, the coronavirus pandemic has significantly affected almost every industry in the United States, including health care and higher education. Faculty and students at colleges and schools of pharmacy nationwide have needed to quickly adapt as the delivery of curricula has shifted to primarily online format. Additionally, experiential rotations have been significantly affected as practice settings such as hospitals and outpatient clinics have limited students' interactions with patients or stopped allowing students on-site altogether. Our commentary will explore strategies that have been employed by experiential education coordinators and pharmacy preceptors from various settings to navigate experiential education during these difficult times while ensuring students successfully meet requirements for graduation. These will include descriptions of transitioning advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) to virtual format, how to safely involve students in the care of COVID-19 patients, and managing scheduling issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Humans , Preceptorship/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(8): ajpe8197, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771277

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) has affected peoples' lives worldwide. This pandemic forced both pharmacy faculty members and students to adapt to a new teaching and learning environment not only in the United States but around the globe. Pharmacy educators faced challenges and opportunities to convert classroom learning and experiences, as well as student assessments, to a remote or online format. The unique approaches taken to overcome difficulties in various countries showed pharmacy faculty members' resilience in the face of adversity and their determination to continue providing education to students. The pandemic also shed light on areas needing improvement for pharmacy educators to work on in the future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Pharmacy , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/psychology , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Teaching/organization & administration
8.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8144, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646924

ABSTRACT

During times of stress, such as those experienced during the novel coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, pharmacy students handle the experience differently. For some, the experience may negatively impact their sense of well-being; for others, being at home with family could actually improve their well-being. While students are completing academic work at home and after they finally return to campus, pharmacy schools need to be keenly aware of students' experiences and implement strategies to build their resilience and improve their well-being. One approach will not meet the needs of all students. Many of the challenges that pharmacy students have faced or will face when they return to the classroom are discussed along with some programs and activities that have proven successful.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Students, Pharmacy/psychology , Academic Success , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Empowerment , Health Status , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Mental Health , Motivation , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Uncertainty , United States
9.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8146, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646989

ABSTRACT

This commentary, written primarily by a recent pharmacy graduate, discusses the impact of COVID-19 on the class of 2020. Everyone has been impacted by COVID-19, but pharmacy students have been affected by and experienced COVID-19 in unique ways. This was the first class to complete pharmacy practice experiences in an online format, miss out on milestone events including graduation, and face uncertainty about becoming licensed and entering the job market in the midst of a pandemic. However, instead of discouraging them, these events have in many ways strengthened the resilience of the class of 2020. Additionally, COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of continued advocacy for the profession and articulation of the pharmacist's expanded role and value to the health care team, and inspired the class of 2020 to join the ranks of colleagues nationwide in raising awareness in these areas. Nevertheless, uncertainty over their future and that of their peers lingers as COVID-19 has forever changed pharmacy education and practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Pharmacy/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Role , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8151, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646975

ABSTRACT

The onset of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has added a new layer of complexity to an already difficult period for academic pharmacy. The need to follow social-distancing guidelines has resulted in rapid adoption of technology-enabled communication strategies. While these technologies provide unprecedented ways in which we can connect as an academic community, we must consider their effectiveness in not only promoting exchange of information, but also creating inspiration within the community and supporting the level of interdependence required to tackle the difficult challenges that lie ahead. As the connecting body within the community of pharmacy education, it is incumbent on the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) to consider how we will adapt during this period of disruption. We must adopt new strategies that will allow our members to connect in new, meaningful ways, ways that stimulate ideas, new partnerships, and an overall sense of hope for our future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Wireless Technology/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8131, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646885

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in seismic changes throughout society. Accordingly, academia has been forced to adapt. Changes across all aspects of teaching and instruction have occurred. Students have departed campuses and prospects of their return remain unclear. The Academy, which is generally reluctant to change, has been forced to make rapid adjustments. Among other issues, pharmacy schools and colleges have been forced to mitigate changes to experiential education. Tremendous resources and energy have been invested to actuate the changes that have occurred. In many ways, the disruptions forced upon pharmacy education may usher in a new normal. The likelihood for even a partial return to the customary way of doing things appears increasingly unlikely.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8158, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646817

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted pharmacy graduate and postgraduate education. This crisis has resulted in a cosmic shift in the administration of these programs to ensure core values are sustained. Adjustments may be needed at a minimum to ensure that postgraduate trainees complete program requirements while maintaining safety. Moving forward, additional issues may arise that will need to be addressed such as admissions and program onboarding, acclimating students to new training environments, and managing inadequate resources for distance education, distance practice, and remote versus in-person research opportunities.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Graduate/standards , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pharmacy Residencies/organization & administration , Research/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Teaching/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration
13.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8156, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646696

ABSTRACT

This commentary examines the challenges pharmacy faculty members have faced while working to fulfill their school's tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service during the coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. It also outlines considerations that need to be made before moving forward regarding communication, collaboration, and culture. The pandemic has created opportunities for pharmacy educators to take instructional risks and attempt new didactic and experiential teaching methods and assessment strategies. Working remotely has not only altered pharmacy education, but also scholarship and service. Conducting a broad range of collaborations with accelerated timelines to address COVID-19 has in some instances forged new relationships both between and within universities and focused faculty members on grantsmanship and writing. Faculty governance and administrative leadership have been focused on solving challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic in a collaborative, transparent approach guided by faculty bylaws. Programs have found ways to use these changes to their advantage while advancing the mission of the Academy, which can contribute to changing the culture of how we interact and care about each other with the hope that the positive changes made have an enduring and meaningful impact for years to come.


Subject(s)
Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Empathy , Faculty, Pharmacy/psychology , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care/methods
14.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8155, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646655

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound impact across the United States and the rest of the world. Health care professionals, including pharmacists, are working on the frontlines and across the spectrum of public health and research. To fully optimize the contribution of pharmacists during this crisis, state and federal policies and regulations that limit pharmacists' roles had to be identified and modified. A strong coalition of national pharmacy organizations, including the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, embarked upon an unprecedented level of collaboration to produce a joint statement identifying key policy recommendations. This collective continued working together as the full force of the pandemic was realized and engaged with policy makers at the state and national levels to advocate for these policy recommendations. Ideally the lessons learned in terms of the power of working together in a crisis will reframe future collaborations to the benefit of the profession and ultimately to the patients we serve.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Societies, Pharmaceutical/organization & administration , Accreditation/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
15.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8088, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646642

ABSTRACT

Pharmacy schools and colleges worldwide are facing unprecedented challenges to ensuring sustainable education during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The experiences of pharmacy educators in the Asia-Pacific region in delivering emergency remote teaching, ensuring purposeful experiential placements, supporting displaced or isolated students, and communicating with faculty members, staff members, and students are discussed. The role of this pandemic in accelerating opportunities for new models of pharmacy education across the world is also discussed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans , Pandemics , Preceptorship/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Pharmacy/psychology
16.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8149, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646383

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) has caused dramatic disruptions in pharmacy experiential education. Administrators and programs have worked to help external preceptors, faculty members, and students cope with the new realities of virtual or remote experiences and new or increased use of telemedicine. Clear and effective lines of communication as well as well-reasoned and resourced alternative plans are necessary to help manage the current issues and prepare for future challenges. Doctor of Pharmacy programs should enhance their focus not just on the physical health and well-being of students, faculty members, and external preceptors, but also on their mental and emotional health. The full scope of the impact of the pandemic on experiential education in pharmacy is still unclear, but this situation should serve as a stimulus for innovation and rethinking the paradigm of how pharmacy programs educate and prepare students for pharmacy practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Adaptation, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Pharmacy/psychology , Videoconferencing
17.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8135, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646336

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted all facets of pharmacy education, including accreditation and certification activities. In a very short period of time, Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs and pharmacy technician programs had to convert to teaching classes online, experiential education sites had to figure out how to train student pharmacists and pharmacy technicians while ensuring their safety, continuing pharmacy education providers had to move their in-person courses online, and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) had to postpone accreditation site visits. Given the challenges faced by our constituencies, the ACPE implemented processes and suggested solutions that stayed within the boundaries of the standards while at the same time allowing flexibility so that organizations could achieve their educational outcomes even given the constraints produced by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Accreditation/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8157, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646319

ABSTRACT

The administrative response to the coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic for a variety of units housed in the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy is described. Continuity of operations, essential vs nonessential personnel, distance learning, online testing procedures for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program, and the impact on development are discussed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Pharmaceutical Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Pharmaceutical Services/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Pharmacy/economics
19.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8150, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646276

ABSTRACT

Academic institutions work diligently each year to recruit, retain, and graduate Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students who will be positive contributors to our healthcare system. The immergence of a novel coronavirus in 2019 (COVID-19) has threatened these systems. This commentary is a discussion of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the enrollment management processes of PharmD degree programs, including recruitment, admissions, orientation, retention, and graduation. The authors highlight enrollment management processes that may forever be changed by the COVID-19 pandemic. This commentary is intended to assist pharmacy administrators as they reflect on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their own programs and develop strategies to minimize the negative effects.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans , Licensure, Pharmacy/standards , Pandemics , Personnel Selection/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Schools, Pharmacy/standards
20.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8154, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646186

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way we live, work, and study. As faculty members, staff members, and students attempt to create and maintain a new normal because of this pandemic, the preservation of wellbeing becomes the responsibility of each and every one of us. The pandemic has taught us not to presume the importance of wellbeing and has allowed us time to reflect on establishing new assumptions and beliefs about how and when we work and study; how to be more efficient in our work and home responsibilities; and above all, what is most important. We must support ourselves and our students by maintaining a routine, modifying work and coursework expectations, and seeking psychosocial support if needed. Focusing on promoting wellbeing through leadership will move our institutions forward to a brighter future beyond COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Faculty, Pharmacy/psychology , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Pharmacy/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Faculty, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Health Status , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2
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