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5.
Glob Health Sci Pract ; 9(1): 177-186, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168151

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for data to inform coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic response efforts. At the same time, the pandemic has created challenges for data collection, one of which is interviewer training in the context of social distancing. In sub-Saharan Africa, in-person interviewer training and face-to-face data collection remain the norm, requiring researchers to think creatively about transitioning to remote settings to allow for safer data collection that respects government guidelines. Performance Monitoring for Action (PMA, formerly PMA2020) has collected both cross-sectional and longitudinal data on key reproductive health measures in Africa and Asia since 2013. Relying on partnerships with in-country research institutes and cadres of female interviewers recruited from sampled communities, the project was well-positioned to transition to collecting data on COVID-19 from the onset of the pandemic. This article presents PMA's development of a remote training system for COVID-19 surveys in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, and Nigeria, including challenges faced and lessons learned. We demonstrate that remote interviewer training can be a viable approach when data are critically needed and in-person learning is not possible. We also argue against systematic replacement of in-person trainings with remote learning, instead recommending consideration of local context and a project's individual circumstances when contemplating a transition to remote interviewer training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Data Collection , Education, Distance , Education, Professional/methods , Pandemics , Research Personnel/education , Research/education , Adolescent , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara , Communicable Disease Control , Democratic Republic of the Congo , Female , Humans , Internet , Kenya , Nigeria , Physical Distancing , Reproductive Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Perspect Med Educ ; 9(6): 385-390, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Conversations about educational challenges and potential solutions among a globally and culturally diverse group of health professions' educators can facilitate identity formation, mentoring relationships and professional network building. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it even more important to co-create and disseminate knowledge, specifically regarding online and flexible learning formats. APPROACH: Based on the principles of social learning, we combined speed mentoring and world café formats to offer a virtual Zoom™ workshop, with large and small group discussions, to reach health professions' educators across the globe. The goal was to establish a psychologically safe space for dialogue regarding adaptation to online teaching-learning formats. EVALUATION: We aimed to establish psychological safety to stimulate thought-provoking discussions within the various small groups and obtain valuable contributions from participants. From these conversations, we were able to formulate 'hot tips' on how to adapt to (sometimes new) online teaching-learning formats while nurturing teacher and student wellbeing. REFLECTION: Through this virtual workshop we realized that despite contextual differences, many challenges are common worldwide. We experienced technological difficulties during the session, which needed rapid adaptation by the organising team. We encouraged, but did not pressure, participants to use video and audio during breakout discussions as we wanted them to feel safe and comfortable. The large audience size and different time zones were challenging; therefore, leadership had to be resilient and focussed. Although this virtual format was triggered by the pandemic, the format can be continued in the future to discuss other relevant global education topics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Professional/methods , Health Occupations/education , Adaptation, Psychological , Communication , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Learning , Mentoring , Teaching
10.
J Prof Nurs ; 37(2): 255-260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989039

ABSTRACT

Unprecedented financial and logistical barriers in educating nurses during COVID-19 have threatened nursing education. The purpose of this article is to provide a template to facilitate the maintenance and stability of teaching and learning in a pandemic environment for nursing school administration and faculty leaders. The National Incident Management System (NIMS), previously used in training nurses for emergency preparation and response, has been applied as a guiding framework. The framework consists of five elements: Preparedness, Communication/Information Management, Resource Management, Command and Ongoing Management/Maintenance. This paper addresses how schools of nursing may apply each of these elements to address both the needs of the institution and community. The Comprehensive Vulnerability Management paradigm is further offered as a lens for professional development. Free preparedness education is showcased from leading nursing and healthcare professional and government organizations. Finally, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies are used for integrating NIMS and social dimensions of disaster. Such tools may equip academic leaders at schools of nursing to surmount challenges posed by the pandemic, and to ensure educational readiness to respond to global health crisis through use of the NIMS framework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Professional/methods , Nurses/psychology , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Perinat Med ; 48(5): 446-449, 2020 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260592

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a rapid and massive transition to online education. We describe the response of our Office of Faculty Development at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso (TTUHSC EP) to this unprecedented challenge during and after this post-pandemic crisis. The initiatives for emergency transition to eLearning and faculty development described in this paper may serve as a model for other academic health centers, schools, colleges and universities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Professional/methods , Faculty/organization & administration , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Staff Development/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Education, Professional/organization & administration , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development/methods , Texas
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