Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 30
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259546, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546940

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted schooling for children worldwide. Most vulnerable are non-citizen children without access to public education. This study aims to explore challenges faced in achieving education access for children of refugee and asylum-seekers, migrant workers, stateless and undocumented persons in Malaysia during the pandemic. In-depth interviews of 33 stakeholders were conducted from June 2020 to March 2021. Data were thematically analysed. Our findings suggest that lockdowns disproportionately impacted non-citizen households as employment, food and housing insecurity were compounded by xenophobia, exacerbating pre-existing inequities. School closures disrupted school meals and deprived children of social interaction needed for mental wellbeing. Many non-citizen children were unable to participate in online learning due to the scarcity of digital devices, and poor internet connectivity, parental support, and home learning environments. Teachers were forced to adapt to online learning and adopt alternative arrangements to ensure continuity of learning and prevent school dropouts. The lack of government oversight over learning centres meant that measures taken were not uniform. The COVID-19 pandemic presents an opportunity for the design of more inclusive national educational policies, by recognising and supporting informal learning centres, to ensure that no child is left behind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education , Emigrants and Immigrants/education , Refugees/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Qualitative Research , Schools/organization & administration
2.
FEBS Open Bio ; 11(11): 2888-2901, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490673

ABSTRACT

Demonstrators spend significant time with students on a weekly basis in instructional laboratories and are well poised to offer students meaningful learning. Most often, effective demonstrator training is neglected due to time and resource restraints and it is clear more attention is needed. We hypothesized that students' learning experience in laboratories would improve if demonstrators were well trained particularly across three overlapping learning domains: subject-specific knowledge (cognitive and psychomotor), problem solving (cognitive) and group management including personalized student learning strategies (affective). We assessed both students and demonstrators on the impact of this extensive demonstrator training in 1st- and 2nd-year bioscience practical courses over two years. The results show that all students rated the demonstrators' performance higher after the extensive training. Students from both years valued the provision of problem-solving skills; however, 1st-year students placed greater value on the demonstrator's ability to address student inclusivity, whereas 2nd-year students preferred the provision of strong subject knowledge. Interestingly, demonstrators' own perception of their teaching ability was different from student feedback on their performance, which may be due to lack of reflective practice. We propose a multimodal training framework that includes inclusivity/approachability and reflection as an integral part of training. This study further suggests that demonstrator training needs to be tailored to the changing needs of students as they progress through the different levels of their degree. Our proposed framework is particularly relevant to the current pandemic which has affected young people's mental health, confidence and openness to new experiences.


Subject(s)
Education/methods , Students/psychology , Teacher Training/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Curriculum , Feedback , Female , Humans , Laboratories , Learning , Male
3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(39): 1374-1376, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444555

ABSTRACT

Beginning in January 2021, the U.S. government prioritized ensuring continuity of learning for all students during the COVID-19 pandemic (1). To estimate the extent of COVID-19-associated school disruptions, CDC and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory used a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) (2) statistical approach to estimate the most likely actual learning modality based on patterns observed in past data, accounting for conflicting or missing information and systematic Internet searches (3) for COVID-19-related school closures. This information was used to assess how many U.S. schools were open, and in which learning modalities, during August 1-September 17, 2021. Learning modalities included 1) full in-person learning, 2) a hybrid of in-person and remote learning, and 3) full remote learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education/methods , Education/statistics & numerical data , Schools/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Humans , United States/epidemiology
4.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
7.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(26): 953-958, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291355

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, schools across the United States began transitioning to virtual learning during spring 2020. However, schools' learning modes varied during the 2020-21 school year across states as schools transitioned at differing times back to in-person learning, in part reflecting updated CDC guidance. Reduced access to in-person learning is associated with poorer learning outcomes and adverse mental health and behavioral effects in children (1-3). Data on the learning modes available in 1,200 U.S. public school districts (representing 46% of kindergarten through grade 12 [K-12] public school enrollment) from all 50 states and the District of Columbia during September 2020-April 2021 were matched with National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) demographic data. Learning mode access was assessed for K-12 students during the COVID-19 pandemic, over time and by student race/ethnicity, geography, and grade level group. Across all assessed racial/ethnic groups, prevalence of virtual-only learning showed more variability during September-December 2020 but declined steadily from January to April 2021. During January-April 2021, access to full-time in-person learning for non-Hispanic White students increased by 36.6 percentage points (from 38.0% to 74.6%), compared with 31.1 percentage points for non-Hispanic Black students (from 32.3% to 63.4%), 23.0 percentage points for Hispanic students (from 35.9% to 58.9%) and 30.6 percentage points for students of other races/ethnicities (from 26.3% to 56.9%). In January 2021, 39% of students in grades K-5 had access to full-time in-person learning compared with 33% of students in grades 6-8 and 30% of students in grades 9-12. Disparities in full-time in-person learning by race/ethnicity existed across school levels and by geographic region and state. These disparities underscore the importance of prioritizing equitable access to this learning mode for the 2021-22 school year. To increase equitable access to full-time in-person learning for the 2021-22 school year, school leaders should focus on providing safety-optimized in-person learning options across grade levels. CDC's K-12 operational strategy presents a pathway for schools to safely provide in-person learning through implementing recommended prevention strategies, increasing vaccination rates for teachers and older students with a focus on vaccine equity, and reducing community transmission (4).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Learning , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Child , Educational Status , /statistics & numerical data , Geography , Humans , /statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Neuroimmune Pharmacol ; 16(3): 519-530, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283811

ABSTRACT

This brief report collects the program and abstracts of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology (SNIP) COVID-19 Virtual Workshop held on April 9, 2021. The workshop consisted of four symposia: Symposium 1: Molecular approaches to COVID-19 pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms; Symposium 2: Therapeutic and vaccine approaches to COVID-19; Symposium 3: Early Career Investigator talks; and Symposium 4: Diversity and Inclusion SNIP Committee (DISC) program: Well-being and reflections. The workshop also featured four special talks on COVID-19 and funding opportunities from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA); COVID-19 and funding opportunities from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); opportunities from NIH for early career investigator (ECI) fellows; and neurologic and psychiatric complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Presenters included NIH officials, SNIP members, and non-member scientists whose abstracts were submitted and accepted for inclusion in the virtual event hosted by the University of Nebraska Medical Center via Zoom webinar. A special theme issue of SNIP's official journal, the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (JNIP), will collect select papers from the workshop along with other related manuscripts in a special theme issue titled "Neuroimmune Pharmacology of SARS-CoV-2."


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Education/trends , Neuroimmunomodulation/immunology , Societies, Scientific/trends , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Education/methods , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Neuroimmunomodulation/drug effects
11.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(9): 1146-1151, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the most difficult public policy decisions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic has been about how to offer K-12 instruction. We sought to determine whether differences in instruction types at the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year were related to differences in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in Illinois counties during the first 3 weeks of the school year. METHODS: We divided Illinois counties into 3 groups based on the instruction type used for a majority of K-12 students at the start of the school year: in-person, hybrid, or online-only. We used synthetic control analysis to match counties between the 3 groups. RESULTS: Both majority hybrid and majority online-only counties had significantly fewer new cases than majority in-person counties. There were no significant differences in new cases between majority hybrid counties and majority online-only counties or in new hospital admissions or deaths between any of the 3 county groups. CONCLUSIONS: This paper adds to the growing scientific consensus that at least some forms of in-person K-12 instruction have not contributed significantly to the spread of the pandemic. However, our results suggest that there may be an important difference between fully in-person instruction and hybrid instruction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education/methods , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Illinois/epidemiology , Pandemics , Schools
14.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 12, 2021 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089104

ABSTRACT

This viewpoint examines the impact of COVID-19 travel bans and remote education on the global health education of students from high-income countries (HIC) and low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and explores potential opportunities for strengthening global health education based upon more dispersed and equitable practices. Global health is unique in the opportunities it can offer to students during the pandemic if programs can manage and learn from the pandemic's many challenges. Global health educators can: shift to sustainable remote engagement and mobilize resources globally to facilitate this; collaborate with partners to support the efforts to deal with the current pandemic and to prepare for its next phases; partner in new ways with health care professional students and faculty from other countries; collaborate in research with partners in studies of pandemic related health disparities in any country; and document and examine the impact of the pandemic on health care workers and students in different global contexts. These strategies can help work around pandemic travel restrictions, overcome the limitations of existing inequitable models of engagement, and better position global health education and face future challenges while providing the needed support to LMIC partners to participate more equally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical/trends , Education, Nursing/trends , Education, Public Health Professional/trends , Education , Global Health/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , International Cooperation , Models, Educational , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Res Dev Disabil ; 109: 103851, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065562

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, already limited services and resources for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in China became even more scarce. This qualitative case study highlights one online parent education and training (PET) program developed during the pandemic to offer home-intervention strategies to parents of children with ASD in mainland China. This exploratory study sought to examine the emic perspectives of the trainers and parents who participated in the 12-week intensive training program while considering the cultural context in China and the transnational, remote nature of the program. METHODS: The primary data focused on the experiences of the trainers and parents within PET program's structure and strategies, which were adapted from the Training of Trainers model, and were collected from semi-structured, in-depth individual and focus group interviews conducted virtually with trainers (n = 4). Supplemental data sources included training session materials and feedback forms collected from parents (n = 294) at the midpoint and end of the program. After the collected data were sorted and condensed, a thematic analysis was performed using the data analysis spiral to further organize and code the data, and the codes were finally collapsed into themes. FINDINGS: Three overarching themes were identified: (1) training as modeling with resources, (2) dilemmas in cultural contexts and expectations, and (3) cultivating parent support networks. CONCLUSION: The online PET program became a hub of support networks and learning spaces for parents of children with ASD in different regions in China during the pandemic. Through the interactive virtual training sessions, parents were supported by continuous feedback on their home intervention and coached to cultivate support networks among themselves despite tensions arising from cultural differences and to implement effective intervention strategies that were individualized and authenticated to their specific familial needs.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Nonprofessional , Education/methods , Parents/psychology , Psychosocial Support Systems , Adult , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , China/epidemiology , Education, Nonprofessional/methods , Education, Nonprofessional/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Models, Educational , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(3): e11-e12, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950748

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease that can spread from one person to person. This virus is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China. Iran's novel coronavirus cases reached 17,361 on 17 March, while death toll reached approximately 1,135. Its first death was officially announced on 20 February 2020 in Qom. The 2019 coronavirus pandemic has affected educational systems around the world, Also in Iran, and led to the closure of face to face courses in schools and universities. Therefore, virtual education can be seen as a turning point in education of these days in Iran.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Virtual Reality , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Education/trends , Humans , Iran , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Psychological Distance , Teaching/psychology , Teaching/standards
19.
Int J Cardiol ; 324: 131-138, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893924

ABSTRACT

Fulminant myocarditis (FM) is a form of acute myocardial inflammation leading to rapid-onset hemodynamic instability due to cardiogenic shock or life-threatening arrhythmias. As highlighted by recent registries, FM is associated with high rates of death and heart transplantation, regardless of the underlying histology. Because of a paucity of evidence-based management strategies exists for this disease, an International workshop on FM was held in Wuhan, China, in October 2019, in order to share knowledge on the disease and identify areas of consensus. The present report highlights both agreements and controversies in FM management across the world, focusing the attention on areas of opportunity, FM definition, the use of endomyocardial biopsy and viral identification on heart specimens, treatment algorithms including immunosuppression and the timing of circulatory support escalation. This report incorporates the most recent recommendations from national and international professional societies. Main areas of interest and aims of future prospective observational registries and randomized controlled trials were finally identified and suggested.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Management , Education/methods , Internationality , Myocarditis/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Education/trends , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Myocarditis/therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL