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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263404, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674012

ABSTRACT

Education is a fundamental human right. Yet there remain gaps in our understanding of undocumented children in Malaysia and their vulnerabilities in education access. This study aims to describe and contextualise undocumented children in Malaysia and their access to education. We conducted a desk review and in-depth interviews with 33 key stakeholders from June 2020 to March 2021. Framework analysis was conducted. Salient themes were geographical location and legal identity in terms of citizenship and migration status. We found that the lack of legal identity and non-recognition by the State was the root cause of vulnerability, experienced uniformly by undocumented populations in Malaysia. Only undocumented children with Malaysian parents or guardians can enter public schools under the Malaysian government's 'Zero Reject Policy'. Most undocumented and non-citizen children must rely on informal education provided by alternative or community learning centres that typically lack standardised curricula, resources, and accreditation for education progression beyond primary levels. Nevertheless, as non-citizen groups are diverse, certain groups experience more privilege, while others are more disadvantaged in terms of the quality of informal education and the highest level of education accessible. In Peninsular Malaysia, a very small proportion of refugees and asylum-seekers may additionally access tertiary education on scholarships. In Sabah, children of Indonesian migrant workers have access to learning centres with academic accreditation supported by employers in plantations and the Indonesian Consulate, whereas Filipino migrants who were initially recognised as refugees are now receiving little government or embassy support. Stateless Rohingya refugees in Peninsular Malaysia and Bajau Laut children at Sabah are arguably the most marginalised and have the poorest educational opportunities at basic literacy and numeracy levels, despite the latter receiving minimal governmental education support. Implementing a rights-based approach towards education would mean allowing all children equal opportunity to access and thrive in high-quality schools.


Subject(s)
Education/legislation & jurisprudence , Education/organization & administration , Human Rights/standards , Refugees/education , Transients and Migrants/education , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Malaysia , Male , Young Adult
2.
FEMS Microbiol Lett ; 368(18)2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569696

ABSTRACT

With more than one academic year into the pandemic, it is timely to consider the lessons we learnt, and how they could shape education in the future. Papers from around the globe, reflecting on the directions we took and could take, were published in the FEMS Microbiology Letters virtual Thematic Issue 'Educating in a pandemic and beyond' in October 2021. Its content is reviewed here to facilitate discussions within the professional community. Online platforms and tools, that allowed a rapid emergency response, are covered, as well as enhancing student engagement, complementing and blending in-person activities with online elements for more flexible and accessible learning opportunities, the need for educator training, and improving science literacy overall and microbiology literacy specifically. As we go forward, in order to benefit from blended and flexible learning, we need to select our approaches based on evidence, and mindful of the potential impact on learners and educators. Education did not only continue during the pandemic, but it evolved, leading us into the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Education/trends , Humans , Learning , Science/education , Students , Teaching/trends
3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259546, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546940

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted schooling for children worldwide. Most vulnerable are non-citizen children without access to public education. This study aims to explore challenges faced in achieving education access for children of refugee and asylum-seekers, migrant workers, stateless and undocumented persons in Malaysia during the pandemic. In-depth interviews of 33 stakeholders were conducted from June 2020 to March 2021. Data were thematically analysed. Our findings suggest that lockdowns disproportionately impacted non-citizen households as employment, food and housing insecurity were compounded by xenophobia, exacerbating pre-existing inequities. School closures disrupted school meals and deprived children of social interaction needed for mental wellbeing. Many non-citizen children were unable to participate in online learning due to the scarcity of digital devices, and poor internet connectivity, parental support, and home learning environments. Teachers were forced to adapt to online learning and adopt alternative arrangements to ensure continuity of learning and prevent school dropouts. The lack of government oversight over learning centres meant that measures taken were not uniform. The COVID-19 pandemic presents an opportunity for the design of more inclusive national educational policies, by recognising and supporting informal learning centres, to ensure that no child is left behind.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education , Emigrants and Immigrants/education , Refugees/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Qualitative Research , Schools/organization & administration
4.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
7.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(26): 953-958, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291355

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, schools across the United States began transitioning to virtual learning during spring 2020. However, schools' learning modes varied during the 2020-21 school year across states as schools transitioned at differing times back to in-person learning, in part reflecting updated CDC guidance. Reduced access to in-person learning is associated with poorer learning outcomes and adverse mental health and behavioral effects in children (1-3). Data on the learning modes available in 1,200 U.S. public school districts (representing 46% of kindergarten through grade 12 [K-12] public school enrollment) from all 50 states and the District of Columbia during September 2020-April 2021 were matched with National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) demographic data. Learning mode access was assessed for K-12 students during the COVID-19 pandemic, over time and by student race/ethnicity, geography, and grade level group. Across all assessed racial/ethnic groups, prevalence of virtual-only learning showed more variability during September-December 2020 but declined steadily from January to April 2021. During January-April 2021, access to full-time in-person learning for non-Hispanic White students increased by 36.6 percentage points (from 38.0% to 74.6%), compared with 31.1 percentage points for non-Hispanic Black students (from 32.3% to 63.4%), 23.0 percentage points for Hispanic students (from 35.9% to 58.9%) and 30.6 percentage points for students of other races/ethnicities (from 26.3% to 56.9%). In January 2021, 39% of students in grades K-5 had access to full-time in-person learning compared with 33% of students in grades 6-8 and 30% of students in grades 9-12. Disparities in full-time in-person learning by race/ethnicity existed across school levels and by geographic region and state. These disparities underscore the importance of prioritizing equitable access to this learning mode for the 2021-22 school year. To increase equitable access to full-time in-person learning for the 2021-22 school year, school leaders should focus on providing safety-optimized in-person learning options across grade levels. CDC's K-12 operational strategy presents a pathway for schools to safely provide in-person learning through implementing recommended prevention strategies, increasing vaccination rates for teachers and older students with a focus on vaccine equity, and reducing community transmission (4).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Learning , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Child , Educational Status , /statistics & numerical data , Geography , Humans , /statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
9.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11126, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154926

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The virtual learning environment has become increasingly important due to physical distance requirements put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic. The transition to a virtual format has been challenging for case-based teaching sessions, which involve substantial audience participation. We developed a faculty development workshop aimed at teaching health professions educators how to use various interactive virtual tools within videoconferencing platforms to facilitate virtual case-based sessions. Methods: Two 90-minute workshops were piloted as a faculty development initiative. The facilitators demonstrated interactive teaching tools that could be used within virtual case-based sessions. Then, participants discussed how to incorporate these tools into case-based teaching sessions of different class sizes in small-group breakout sessions. Participants completed an online survey following each workshop to evaluate the sessions. Results: A total of 18 and 26 subjects participated in the first and second workshops, respectively. Survey response rates were 100% (n = 18) and 65% (n = 17) for the first and second workshops, respectively. Both groups provided overall high ratings and reported that the workshop was clear, organized, and relevant. Participants were more familiar and comfortable with the use of various interactive tools for online teaching. Discussion: Distance online teaching will be increasingly required for an undetermined time. Faculty development efforts are crucial to facilitate effective interactive teaching sessions that engage learners and maximize learning. This virtual teaching workshop is a simple and straightforward way to introduce a more interactive format to virtual case-based teaching in the health professions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/trends , Problem-Based Learning/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/standards , Humans , Models, Educational , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
10.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11114, 2021 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154924

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Given barriers to learner assessment in the authentic clinical environment, simulated patient encounters are gaining attention as a valuable opportunity for competency assessment across the health professions. Simulation-based assessments offer advantages over traditional methods by providing realistic clinical scenarios through which a range of technical, analytical, and communication skills can be demonstrated. However, simulation for the purpose of assessment represents a paradigm shift with unique challenges, including preservation of a safe learning environment, standardization across learners, and application of valid assessment tools. Our goal was to create an interactive workshop to equip educators with the knowledge and skills needed to conduct assessments in a simulated environment. Methods: Participants engaged in a 90-minute workshop with large-group facilitated discussions and small-group activities for practical skill development. Facilitators guided attendees through a simulated grading exercise followed by in-depth analysis of three types of assessment tools. Participants designed a comprehensive simulation-based assessment encounter, including selection or creation of an assessment tool. Results: We have led two iterations of this workshop, including an in-person format at an international conference and a virtual format at our institution during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a total of 93 participants. Survey responses indicated strong overall ratings and impactfulness of the workshop. Discussion: Our workshop provides a practical, evidence-based framework to guide educators in the development of a simulation-based assessment program, including optimization of the environment, design of the simulated case, and utilization of meaningful, valid assessment tools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence/standards , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Education/organization & administration , Faculty/standards , Simulation Training/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Reasoning , Curriculum , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Interprofessional Education/methods , Interprofessional Education/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Environment , Teaching
13.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 12, 2021 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089104

ABSTRACT

This viewpoint examines the impact of COVID-19 travel bans and remote education on the global health education of students from high-income countries (HIC) and low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and explores potential opportunities for strengthening global health education based upon more dispersed and equitable practices. Global health is unique in the opportunities it can offer to students during the pandemic if programs can manage and learn from the pandemic's many challenges. Global health educators can: shift to sustainable remote engagement and mobilize resources globally to facilitate this; collaborate with partners to support the efforts to deal with the current pandemic and to prepare for its next phases; partner in new ways with health care professional students and faculty from other countries; collaborate in research with partners in studies of pandemic related health disparities in any country; and document and examine the impact of the pandemic on health care workers and students in different global contexts. These strategies can help work around pandemic travel restrictions, overcome the limitations of existing inequitable models of engagement, and better position global health education and face future challenges while providing the needed support to LMIC partners to participate more equally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical/trends , Education, Nursing/trends , Education, Public Health Professional/trends , Education , Global Health/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , International Cooperation , Models, Educational , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 81(9): 1-6, 2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807334

ABSTRACT

Hands-on wet lab simulation training is a vital part of modern surgical training. Since 2010, surgical 'boot camps' have been run by many UK deaneries to teach core surgical trainees basic entry level skills. Training in advanced skills often requires attendance at national fee-paying courses. In the Wessex Deanery, multiple, free of charge, core surgical 'field camps' were developed to provide more advanced level teaching in the particular specialty preference of each core surgical trainee. After the COVID-19 pandemic, national hands-on courses will be challenging to provide and deanery-based advanced skills training may be the way forward for craft-based specialties. The experiences over 2 years of delivering the Wessex core surgical field camps are shared, giving a guide and advice for other trainers on how to run a field camp.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections , Education , General Surgery/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Simulation Training , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Humans , Models, Anatomic , Models, Educational , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Training Support/methods , United Kingdom
18.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 103, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740538

ABSTRACT

Global health trainees rely on immersive experiences to apply their classroom knowledge in real-world settings. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic travel has come to a halt and short-term experiences are no longer available in their current form. As with didactic material, global health programs have an opportunity to innovate the delivery of applied learning, providing trainees with robust, mentored experiences that promote the acquisition of core global health competencies. We provide a series of practical solutions for remote applied learning including case-based learning, pathfinder pedagogy, virtual reality simulations, and twinning. We further describe the role of these approaches in addressing common criticisms of short-term experiences and their potential for creating new win-win dynamics between institutions and trainees.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance , Global Health/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Problem-Based Learning , Teaching/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
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