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2.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256688, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372022

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on grade inflation in higher education. Data were collected from five universities in Turkey, including grades of 152,352 students who attended 2,841 courses conducted by 903 instructors before the COVID-19 pandemic and grades of 149,936 students who attended 2,841 courses conducted by 847 instructors during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of this study demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic causes a marginal increase in grades in higher education when the other factors that might explain the differences are controlled. Grade inflation of 9.21% is the highest ever reported in literature. Compared with a year ago, DD and DC grades decreased 55%; FD and FF grades decreased 31%; and the highest-grade AA increased 41% for courses taken during the pandemic. Additionally, classroom population, academic history of the instructor, class level, field, university entrance scores, and course execution and evaluation (grading) forms of course notes are important determinants. This increase can be explained by the effort of instructors who are accustomed to face-to-face settings. When they suddenly switch to distant education, they might try to grade higher to compensate for the unforeseen negative circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students , Turkey/epidemiology , Universities
3.
Surgery ; 170(6): 1652-1658, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In surgical training, assessment tools based on strong validity evidence allow for standardized evaluation despite changing external circumstances. At a large academic institution, surgical interns undergo a multimodal curriculum for central line placement that uses a 31-item binary assessment at the start of each academic year. This study evaluated this practice within increased in-person learning restrictions. We hypothesized that external constraints would not affect resident performance nor assessment due to a robust curriculum and assessment checklist. METHODS: From 2018 to 2020, 81 residents completed central line training and assessment. In 2020, this curriculum was modified to conform to in-person restrictions and social distancing guidelines. Resident score reports were analyzed using multivariate analyses to compare performance, objective scoring parameters, and subjective assessments among "precoronavirus disease" years (2018 and 2019) and 2020. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in average scores or objective pass rates over 3 years. Significant differences between 2020 and precoronavirus disease years occurred in subjective pass rates and in first-time success for 4 checklist items: patient positioning, draping, sterile ultrasound probe cover placement, and needle positioning before venipuncture. CONCLUSION: Modifications to procedural training within current restrictions did not adversely affect residents' overall performance. However, our data suggest that in 2020, expert trainers may not have ensured learner acquisition of automated procedural steps. Additionally, although 2020 raters could have been influenced by logistical barriers leading to more lenient grading, the assessment tool ensured training and assessment integrity.


Subject(s)
Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/education , COVID-19 , Educational Measurement/standards , General Surgery/standards , Humans
4.
Clin Ter ; 172(4): 284-304, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304849

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Many Italian universities during the COVID-19 pandemic had numerous students attending hospital wards. The training of health care students was necessary to prepare for good practices in implementing knowledge about COVID-19 and minimizing contagion among students who carried out the internship. In February 2020, a course aiming to guide health personnel so that they can appropriately address the health emergency posed by the new coronavirus was created, making use of the scientific evidence currently available as well as official sources of information and updates. The aim of this study was the development and validation of a useful tool to evaluate the progress in knowledge regarding COVID-19 of students in degree courses for the health care professions. The reliability of the test was assessed using Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient, while the responsiveness of the test between T0 and T1 was measured with a student t test. The standard error of measurement was used to calculate the minimal detectable change of the tool. The test is made up of 31 items with four multiple-choice answers, one of which is correct. Fifteen bachelor's degree courses at the Sapienza University of Rome were enrolled, for a total population of 1,017 students from different course years. The test showed good internal consistency, with Cronbach's α values of 0.82. The item-total analysis also showed good results, with homogeneous α values from 0.80 to 0.82 for each item. The student t test showed a difference of 3.59 between T0 and T1 (p < 0.001). The minimal detectable change was 0.47. The test is a useful tool for assessing progress in skills regarding COVID-19 for students from bachelor's degree courses in the health professions. It allows the improvement and acquisition of skills as well as a qualitative analysis of the organization of internship degree courses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 13(9): 1174-1179, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275244

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, most universities in North America transitioned to online instruction and assessment in March 2020. Undergraduate pharmacy students in years one to three of two four-year entry-to-practice programs at a university in Canada were administered open-book examinations to complete their didactic winter-term courses in pharmaceutical sciences; behavioural, social, and administrative sciences; and pharmacotherapeutics. The impacts of the switch to open-book examinations on final exam characteristics are examined. METHODS: The ratios and correlations of final exam and midterm grades in 2020, where final exams were open-book, and in 2019, where finals were closed-book, were calculated and compared. RESULTS: In 2020, the ratio of final exam to midterm exam scores for five out of seven courses were significantly larger than they were in 2019. Alternatively, for all but one course, the correlations between midterm and final examination grades showed no significant difference from 2019 to 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to 2019 when finals were administered in a closed-book format, a sudden shift to an open-book format for final exams in 2020 appears to be associated with the final exams becoming easier relative to midterms. However, when considering how final and midterm exam grades correlate year over year, in all but one class, there was no significant difference. These findings suggest that changing exams to be open-book may change how they can be used to inform criterion-referenced or absolute grading decisions but not norm-referenced or rank-based decisions.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Status , Students, Pharmacy/statistics & numerical data , Canada , Humans , Universities
6.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 423-426, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247399

ABSTRACT

Little has been published regarding postgraduate assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need to graduate well-trained specialists including family physicians who play a key role in patient care. The successes and challenges encountered in mounting qualifying 2020 Family Medicine examinations during the COVID-19 pandemic at the University of the West Indies are described in this paper. Human resource, planning, use of technology and virtual environments are discussed, which enabled successful examinations at this multicampus regional site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Family Practice/education , Physicians, Family/standards , Academic Performance , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/methods , Certification/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching/standards , Teaching/trends , West Indies
7.
Int J Lang Commun Disord ; 56(3): 456-472, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to COVID-19, many educators and allied health practitioners are facing the challenge of rapidly transitioning to telepractice delivery of instructional reading and spelling procedures without being fully informed of the evidence. AIMS: A rapid review was conducted to provide educators, allied health practitioners and policymakers with a synthesis of valid, relevant and actionable evidence relating to telepractice delivery of instructional reading and spelling procedures. The aim was to investigate the nature and outcomes of studies examining instructional reading and spelling procedures delivered via telepractice to school-aged students. METHODS & PROCEDURES: A rapid review was undertaken in accordance with the eight-step process published by the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group. Medline (all databases), Embase, Cochrane and ProQuest Central were systematically searched with predefined search terms organized across four key concepts relating to the research questions. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Nine studies were included in this rapid review. Reading and spelling instruction and intervention using telepractice can be feasible and engaging. Telepractice assessment for reading and spelling can be equally effective as onsite assessment. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The evidence base for telepractice delivery of reading and spelling procedures is in its infancy in terms of both the quantity and the quality of the evidence. Insufficient evidence exists to draw clear conclusions about its efficacy, and therefore practitioners should proceed cautiously. What this paper adds What is already known on the subject For onsite delivery, evidence-based reading and spelling assessment, instruction and interventions delivered by educators and allied health practitioners have been shown to accelerate students' skills; less is known about the efficacy of instructional reading and spelling procedures in a telepractice model, which have rapidly become the new norm in many countries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The benefits of telepractice include improved access to services, increased service availability, convenience, time efficiency, caseload management efficiency and removal of logistical barriers relating to cost and geographical location. During the COVID-19 pandemic, telepractice has facilitated continued access to services. What this study adds to existing knowledge Reading and spelling instruction and intervention delivered via telepractice can be feasible and engaging. Telepractice is a viable mode to deliver reading and spelling assessments with strong agreement between telepractice and onsite scores. Given their low methodological quality, the studies in this review provide valuable information around the how of telepractice reading and spelling procedures and highlight the factors that may contribute to positive outcomes with this service delivery model. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? Educators and allied health practitioners need a thorough understanding of the student's telepractice environment and require adequate training and support to engage in telepractice service delivery. Educators and allied health practitioners should consider students for telepractice on a case-by-case basis. Practitioners should proceed cautiously with telepractice reading and spelling assessment, intervention and instruction, with the knowledge that the current available evidence is of limited quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Reading , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Child , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 32(1): 20-25, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091195

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Standardized entrance exams are used in many health professions as one way to objectively measure knowledge and facilitate comparisons across student groups. The physician assistant (PA) profession has historically not employed a profession-specific entrance exam, and the idea was never seriously explored until the Physician Assistant College Admissions Test was developed recently by a commercial assessment publisher, with field testing in some volunteer programs in 2018 and the exam's first administration in May of 2020. The 2020 Physician Assistant Education Association Presidents Commission chose to investigate the issues raised by a consensus-derived, PA-specific entrance exam to stimulate more informed discussion on the efficacy of such an exam. While it may have the potential to enhance efficiency in PA admissions and reduce variability in admissions requirements, a PA entrance exam would also likely introduce new challenges, including increased costs, impact on the diversity of the applicant pool, and incongruence with an increasingly holistic admissions process. The biggest barrier would likely be the lack of current consensus on the knowledge, skills, and attributes that matriculants need to be successful in the program and in clinical practice. Development of a consensus-derived PA entrance exam would be a complex, expensive, and time-consuming endeavor, requiring considerable attention to technical issues of psychometric quality, process transparency, and legal defensibility. Changes being made to health professions admissions practices due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the dropping of test scores as a requirement by some institutions, may make some of the issues raised in this paper more timely than ever.


Subject(s)
Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Physician Assistants/education , School Admission Criteria/trends , Schools, Health Occupations/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , United States
9.
Am J Surg ; 222(2): 248-253, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eight novel virtual surgery electives (VSEs) were developed and implemented in April-May 2020 for medical students forced to continue their education remotely due to COVID-19. METHODS: Each VSE was 1-2 weeks long, contained specialty-specific course objectives, and included a variety of teaching modalities. Students completed a post-course survey to assess changes in their interest and understanding of the specialty. Quantitative methods were employed to analyze the results. RESULTS: Eighty-three students participated in the electives and 67 (80.7%) completed the post-course survey. Forty-six (68.7%) respondents reported "increased" or "greatly increased" interest in the course specialty completed. Survey respondents' post-course understanding of each specialty increased by a statistically significant amount (p-value = <0.0001). CONCLUSION: This initial effort demonstrated that VSEs can be an effective tool for increasing medical students' interest in and understanding of surgical specialties. They should be studied further with more rigorous methods in a larger population.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Career Choice , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Smartphone , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
10.
Andrologia ; 53(3): e13961, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045766

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic led to the suspension of the annual Summer Internship at the American Center for Reproductive Medicine (ACRM). To transit it into an online format, an inaugural 6-week 2020 ACRM Online Mentorship Program was developed focusing on five core pillars of andrology research: scientific writing, scientific methodology, plagiarism understanding, soft skills development and mentee basic andrology knowledge. This study aims to determine mentee developmental outcomes based on student surveys and discuss these within the context of the relevant teaching and learning methodology. The mentorship was structured around scientific writing projects established by the team using a student-centred approach, with one-on-one expert mentorship through weekly formative assessments. Furthermore, weekly online meetings were conducted, including expert lectures, formative assessments and social engagement. Data were collected through final assessments and mentee surveys on mentorship outcomes. Results show that mentees (n = 28) reported a significant (p < .0001) improvement in all criteria related to the five core pillars. These results illustrate that the aims of the online mentorship program were achieved through a unique and adaptive online educational model and that our model has demonstrated its effectiveness as an innovative structured educational experience through the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Andrology/education , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Medical Writing , Models, Educational , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Pandemics/prevention & control , Plagiarism , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/organization & administration
11.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 531-535, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002073

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID 19 pandemic has brought crucial changes in the field of medical education. Ad mist university examinations in India medical schools have switched to online assessment methods to avoid student gatherings. In this context, we conducted online anatomy practical evaluation and we have aimed at quantifying the students' experience on virtual assessment. METHODS: A total of 250 first year MBBS students appeared for online anatomy practical examinations. Immediately after the completion of exams electronic feedback about their experience, in questionnaire format was obtained after getting informed consent. Their feedback was analysed and quantified. RESULTS: Completed feedback forms were submitted by 228 students. More than 50% of students favoured online anatomy spotter examinations. Only 32.8% of students were comfortable with soft parts discussion using images. For image based viva voce 61.4%, 80% & 82% of students responded that the features and orientation of osteology, radiology and embryology images, respectively, were good. For surface marking 55% of the participants preferred online verbal evaluation. Finally, more than 60% of the students preferred the conventional over online assessment methods. CONCLUSIONS: The inclination of students' preference for traditional anatomy examination methods mandates adequate training of both students and teachers for virtual examination. The superiority of conventional anatomy practical examination methods is unbiased but pandemic situations warrant adequate preparedness. In the future the anatomy teaching and evaluation methodology in Indian medical schools have to be drastically reviewed in equivalence with global digitalization.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Anatomy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools, Medical/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
12.
Front Public Health ; 8: 609599, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971923

ABSTRACT

In the wake of COVID-19, there is an urgent need for a diverse public health work force to address problems presented or exacerbated by the global pandemic. Educational programs that create our work force both train and shape the makeup of access through graduate applications. The Graduate Record Exam has a number of standing issues, with additional barriers created by the pandemic. We trace the GRE waiver movement over several years, focusing on the gradual adoption in CEPH accredited programs and the rapid expansion of temporary waivers as a response to testing access. Going forward, we need to consider gaps in waivers during the pandemic and how this data can be used to shape our future use of the GRE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/standards , Public Health/education , School Admission Criteria/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , United States , Young Adult
13.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc87, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971046

ABSTRACT

Objective: Primary outcome of this retrospective study was the comparison of state examination results under simulated treatment conditions in times of Covid-19 versus patient treatment under non-pandemic conditions. Additionally, correlation analysis was performed between students' self- and examiners' assessment of the treatment results. Methods: Within 4 hours, 22 examinees each had to place a multi-surface adhesive anterior and posterior restoration, performed an endodontic treatment on a maxillary premolar and a periodontal debridement of one quadrant. All treatments were performed on a model fixed in a phantom head. Compliance with the prescribed hygiene and social distancing guidelines and self-assessment of the practical performance was part of the practical examination as well. One examiner per examination part evaluated anonymously the final results. The historical control was based on the exam results of a cohort from 2019. Mean values (standard deviation), non-parametric correlations (Spearman's Rho) and group comparisons (Mann-Whitney) were calculated for statistical analysis. Results: Examination results under simulated treatment conditions were significantly worse (p<0.05) than in the cohort that took their state exam in patients, with exception of the endodontic partial exam. The overall scores in restorative dentistry and periodontology of both groups, which include a structured theoretical examination, did not differ. The majority of the candidates rated their performance worse than the examiners, and there was no correlation between self- and third-party assessment. Conclusion: In the comparison of two years, a simulated practical examination without patients in restorative dentistry, endodontics and periodontology resulted in matchable results compared with an examination on patients. Equal conditions for the candidates resulting in better comparability and avoidance of ethical dilemmas of patient treatment under examination conditions could also be arguments towards a state examination under phantom conditions in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Dental/organization & administration , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Dentists/education , Education, Dental/standards , Education, Distance/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Endodontics/education , Humans , Models, Anatomic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self-Assessment , Students, Dental
14.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 610-616, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-882627

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Online open book assessment has been a common alternative to a traditional invigilated test or examination during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, its unsupervised nature increases ease of cheating, which is an academic integrity concern. This study's purpose was to evaluate the integrity of two online open book assessments with different formats (1. Tightly time restricted - 50 min for mid-semester and 2. Take home - any 4 h within a 24-h window for end of semester) implemented in a radiologic pathology unit of a Bachelor of Science (Medical Radiation Science) course during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving a review and analysis of existing information related to the integrity of the two radiologic pathology assessments. Three integrity evaluation approaches were employed. The first approach was to review all the Turnitin plagiarism detection software reports with use of 'seven-words-in-a-row' criterion to identify any potential collusion. The second approach was to search for highly irrelevant assessment answers during marking for detection of other cheating types. Examples of highly irrelevant answers included those not addressing question requirements and stating patients' clinical information not from given patient histories. The third approach was an assessment score statistical analysis through descriptive and inferential statistics to identify any abnormal patterns that might suggest cheating occurred. An abnormal pattern example was high assessment scores. The descriptive statistics used were minimum, maximum, range, first quartile, median, third quartile, interquartile range, mean, standard deviation, fail and full mark rates. T-test was employed to compare mean scores between the two assessments in this year (2020), between the two assessments in the last year (2019), between the two mid-semester assessments in 2019 and 2020, and between this and last years' end of semester assessments. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: No cheating evidence was found in all Turnitin reports and assessment answers. The mean scores of the end of semester assessments in 2019 (88.2%) and 2020 (90.9%) were similar (p = 0.098). However, the mean score of the online open book mid-semester assessment in 2020 (62.8%) was statistically significantly lower than that of the traditional invigilated mid-semester assessment in 2019 (71.8%) with p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: This study shows the use of the online open book assessments with tight time restrictions and the take home formats in the radiologic pathology unit did not have any academic integrity issues. Apparently, the strict assessment time limit played an important role in maintaining their integrity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Plagiarism , Radiology/education , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Australia , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology/education , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Software , Time Factors , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239490, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842451

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes the effects of COVID-19 confinement on the autonomous learning performance of students in higher education. Using a field experiment with 458 students from three different subjects at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), we study the differences in assessments by dividing students into two groups. The first group (control) corresponds to academic years 2017/2018 and 2018/2019. The second group (experimental) corresponds to students from 2019/2020, which is the group of students that had their face-to-face activities interrupted because of the confinement. The results show that there is a significant positive effect of the COVID-19 confinement on students' performance. This effect is also significant in activities that did not change their format when performed after the confinement. We find that this effect is significant both in subjects that increased the number of assessment activities and subjects that did not change the student workload. Additionally, an analysis of students' learning strategies before confinement shows that students did not study on a continuous basis. Based on these results, we conclude that COVID-19 confinement changed students' learning strategies to a more continuous habit, improving their efficiency. For these reasons, better scores in students' assessment are expected due to COVID-19 confinement that can be explained by an improvement in their learning performance.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Education, Distance , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
16.
Postgrad Med ; 132(8): 764-772, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724131

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has upended medical education as well as the lives of healthcare professionals. Higher education institutions have a crucial role in the solution of public health problems by training young doctor candidates, and it is also essential to increase the knowledge level of physician candidates about the epidemic. So, in this study, we aimed to examine Turkish final year medical students' knowledge level and perceptions toward the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The present descriptive multicentered study was conducted with the medical students in the final year of six medical schools located in six geographic regions of Turkey. After ethical approval, data were gathered using an online questionnaire through Google forms between 10 April 2020, and 20 April 2020. RESULTS: In this national survey study, 860 volunteers answered the questions thoroughly. The median age was 24 (22-38) years. A total of 55.3% of the participants were female. The median knowledge level score was 69.0 (0-93.1). The knowledge level was moderate. A total of 34.2% of the participants had a high level of knowledge. A total of 48.7% of participants stated that they felt the most competent about performing CPR. Updates about COVID-19 were followed regularly by 84.5% of the participants. CONCLUSION: We determined that final year medical students are knowledgeable and aware of this pandemic. We, medical educators, should inculcate relevant knowledge and educate the medical students to improve practices in the current pandemic, as well as for future epidemics. Different learning techniques should be added to the curriculum, especially at the time which widespread panic and uncertainty are prevalent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Educational Measurement , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Social Perception , Students, Medical , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Curriculum/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
17.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 448-451, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696292

ABSTRACT

STUDY PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious illness of high public concern. Healthcare students are directly or indirectly exposed to this disease. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge of healthcare students in the central region of Saudi Arabia. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was planned to collect information from healthcare students living in the central region of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was formulated to evaluate the healthcare student's knowledge towards COVID-19 pandemic. The collected data were analysed by using frequencies of correct knowledge answers. RESULTS: A total of 612 students were analysed for the study. The overall knowledge score of healthcare students was 65.7%. The regression analysis showed a significant association between academic year and knowledge score p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrates satisfactory student's knowledge but lacks awareness about background and mode of transmission of this disease; therefore, there is a strong need for further education and training programmes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Educational Measurement , Public Health/education , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
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