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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Education plays a fundamental role in everyone's wellbeing. That means it is essential to provide quality inclusive activities to ensure equity and equality of opportunity in order to shape a cohesive, democratic, healthy society. METHODS: In this study we focus on how inclusive educational practice addresses students with rare diseases, looking at teachers' knowledge and opinions in this regard. A questionnaire was administered to 574 teachers who taught in various stages of non-university education to determine their knowledge and opinions about different dimensions: conceptualization, legislation, intervention, and diagnosis. RESULTS: The results suggested various ideas for improvement in pursuit of positive, real inclusion, such as the need to improve teachers' knowledge and understanding of these students' characteristics and potential, with widespread specific training being urgently needed. CONCLUSIONS: in summary, students' rights to education without discrimination is a basic premise of an educational system, leading to the need for a complete educational response that allows each student to develop as a person.


Subject(s)
Educational Personnel , Rare Diseases , Attitude , Curriculum , Educational Status , Humans
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903372

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, teachers had to conduct online classes because of the breakdown of school learning. Teacher competence has a great impact on the students' learning outcomes in online learning. Teacher resilience is also important to help teachers survive and achieve a high level of well-being in emergency situations. Previous studies have explored the protective and risk factors of teacher resilience, among which teacher competence in various aspects is included. In addition, teachers' age differences in competence and resilience have been the focus of past studies. However, few studies have investigated the impact of teacher competence on students' online learning outcomes, the mediating role of teacher resilience, and the moderating effect of age when teachers participate in emergent online teaching. To address the above gap, this study explored teachers' perceptions of students' online learning outcomes and how teacher competence in online teaching and resilience can predict these outcomes. The data of 159,203 participants were collected and subjected to correlation analyses and a moderated-mediation effect test. The results indicated that (1) teacher competence in online teaching was positively related to perceived online learning outcomes; (2) teacher resilience was positively related to the teachers' perceived online learning outcomes; (3) teacher resilience played a partial mediating role between teacher competence in online teaching and perceived online learning outcomes; and (4) teachers' age moderated the direct and indirect relation between teacher competence in online teaching and perceived online learning outcomes. The findings imply that teachers should strengthen their own teaching competence and their resilience before conducting online teaching. In addition, this study proposes intervention strategies to enhance teachers' resilience and well-being through teacher competence cultivation and provides suggestions for different age levels of teachers to develop and train their online teaching competence and resilience in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 7(1): 25, 2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833370

ABSTRACT

Spatial skills are critical for student success in K-12 STEM education. Teachers' spatial skills and feelings about completing spatial tasks influence students' spatial and STEM learning at both the primary and secondary levels. However, whether spatial skills and spatial anxiety differ or not between these two teacher levels is unknown. Additionally, the relations between teachers' spatial skills, spatial anxiety, and their use of spatial pedagogical practices in remote learning settings is unknown. Here, we investigated if spatial skills and spatial anxiety differ between teachers working at primary versus secondary levels, and examined the relations between their spatial skills and spatial anxiety while accounting for additional influential factors-general reasoning ability and general anxiety. Lastly, we investigated how teachers' spatial skills in conjunction with their spatial anxiety relate to their use of spatial teaching practices for online instruction. Sixty-two K-12 teachers completed measures of spatial skills, spatial anxiety, general anxiety, general reasoning, and a teaching activities questionnaire. Results indicate that spatial skills and spatial anxiety may not vary between teachers working at primary versus secondary levels, but that higher spatial skills in teachers are associated with lower spatial anxiety for mental manipulation tasks. Additionally, teachers with weaker spatial skills and lower mental manipulation anxiety reported more frequently using spatial teaching practices when teaching remotely due to COVID-19. These findings may have broad implications for teacher professional development with regards to developing students' spatial skills during remote learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Learning , Students
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 303, 2022 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the consequent social distancing measures caused unprecedented disruption for medical and healthcare education. This study examined medical teachers' experience with emergency remote teaching during the pandemic and their acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic. METHODS: In this sequential mixed methods study, online surveys were disseminated to teachers (n = 139) at two Asia-Pacific medical schools to evaluate their experience with emergency remote teaching during the pandemic. Subsequently, in-depth interviews were conducted with teachers from both institutions (n = 13). Each interviewee was classified into an adopter category based on Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically, and the descriptive themes were mapped to broader themes partly based on the Technology Acceptance Model and these included: (i) perceived usefulness of online teaching, (ii) perceived ease of delivering online teaching, (iii) experience with institutional support and (iv) acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic. RESULTS: Our participants described accounts of successes with their emergency remote teaching and difficulties they experienced. In general, most participants found it difficult to deliver clinical skills teaching remotely and manage large groups of students in synchronous online classes. With regards to institutional support, teachers with lower technological literacy required just-in-time technical support, while teachers who were innovative in their online teaching practices found that IT support alone could not fully address their needs. It was also found that teachers' acceptance of online teaching after the pandemic was influenced by their belief about the usefulness of online teaching. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that our participants managed to adapt to emergency remote teaching during this pandemic, and it also identified a myriad of drivers and blockers to online teaching adoption for medical teachers. It highlights the need for institutes to better support their teaching staff with diverse needs in their online teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798899

ABSTRACT

This study reports the results of focus groups with school nurses and teachers from elementary, middle, and high schools to explore their perceptions of child and adolescent oral health. Participants included 14 school nurses and 15 teachers (83% female; 31% Hispanic; 21% White; 21% Asian; 14% African American; and 13% Others). Respondents were recruited from Los Angeles County schools and scheduled by school level for six one-hour focus groups using Zoom. Audio recordings were transcribed, reviewed, and saved with anonymization of speaker identities. NVivo software (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia) was used to facilitate content analysis and identify key themes. The nurses' rate of "Oral Health Education" comments statistically exceeded that of teachers, while teachers had higher rates for "Parental Involvement" and "Mutual Perception" comments. "Need for Care" was perceived to be more prevalent in immigrants to the United States based on student behaviors and complaints. "Access to Care" was seen as primarily the nurses' responsibilities. Strong relationships between community clinics and schools were viewed by some as integral to students achieving good oral health. The results suggest dimensions and questions important to item development for oral health surveys of children and parents to address screening, management, program assessment, and policy planning.


Subject(s)
Educational Personnel , Nurses , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Los Angeles , Male , Oral Health , School Teachers , Schools , United States
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792690

ABSTRACT

While a global understanding of teacher well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic is beginning to emerge, much remains to be understood about what early childhood teachers have felt and experienced with respect to their work and well-being. The present mixed-method study examined early care and education (ECE) teachers' working conditions and physical, psychological, and professional well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic using a national sample of 1434 ECE teachers in the U.S. We also explored differences in working conditions and well-being among in-person, online, and closed schools, given the unique challenges and risks that ECE teachers may have faced by teaching in these different modalities. From the results of an online survey, we found that in the early months of the pandemic, many ECE teachers faced stressful, challenging work environments. Some were teaching in new, foreign modes and formats, and those still teaching in person faced new challenges. We found many common issues and challenges related to psychological and physical well-being across the three teaching groups from the qualitative analysis, but a more complicated picture emerged from the quantitative analysis. After controlling for education and center type, we found that aspects of professional commitment were lower among those teachers teaching in person. Additionally, there were racial differences across several of our measures of well-being for teachers whose centers were closed. Upon closer examination of these findings via a moderation analysis with teacher modality, we found that Black and Hispanic teachers had higher levels of psychological well-being for some of our indicators when their centers were closed, yet these benefits were not present for Black and Hispanic teachers teaching in person.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792676

ABSTRACT

This article looked at the situation of university teachers in Poland during the COVID-19 epidemic as a result of their need to work remotely. The study was conducted in the first stage (I) on 21 academicians and in the second stage (II) on 18 academicians. The study was conducted to determine the level of productivity of the study group in their online learning competencies in relation to their well-being, as well as during the height, and weakening of the epidemic. The results of the survey conducted, especially during the height of the epidemic, indicated varying levels of self-evaluation of their productivity in relation to their digital competencies linked to the need for them to work remotely, which also affected their psychological well-being. Several cases of respondents indicated a negative assessment of their own productivity, and thus their quality of work life and sense of psychological well-being. However, some respondents, on the contrary, showed a desire to work, the need for self-improvement, and to continue their mission of teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , Epidemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785711

ABSTRACT

In the last two years, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on schools and its consequences for the training of new teachers have been the subject of numerous studies. The pandemic has led to a change in schools and their functioning, as trainee teachers have had to be introduced to a new environment for which university training proved to be insufficient. The pandemic poses shared challenges in which future teachers must be present. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of students enrolled in Early Childhood Education courses at the University of Extremadura (Spain) regarding the impact relationships between the subjects and agents of the educational communities. In order to achieve this goal, we present a qualitative study with a phenomenological design. The results of this research show perceptions in line with what the scientific literature shows: a profound change in the relationships between the different agents. Communication increased, but pedagogical issues were displaced by concerns about the health emergency. This study concludes with the need to broaden the knowledge of future teachers about the administrative functioning of and their relationship with the school, as well as about new resources to address new challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Humans , Pandemics , Schools , Students
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753492

ABSTRACT

This paper conducts quantitative research on the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the adaptation to digital learning environments (DLE) of a group of 908 university professors. We compared the perceptions of participants who were digital natives (born before 1980) with those of digital immigrants (born after 1980). For this purpose, a validated survey was used and the obtained responses statistically analyzed. The results show a negative correlation between pandemic stress and the digital competence of professors and their adaptation skills to digital environments, which although weak for both of the two groups compared are stronger for digital immigrants. Both self-confidence and digital competence show a positive influence on the perception of adaptation of skills to DLE, and this is weaker in digital natives. Gaps were identified by gender and area of knowledge of the participants; consequently, the need to carry out training actions for university faculty on skills linked to their digital competence in teaching is clear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Measurement , Humans , Learning , Pandemics
10.
J Mother Child ; 25(3): 202-208, 2022 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687888

ABSTRACT

Temporary lockdowns have been introduced in many countries as a preventive measure against the spread of the virus in 2020 and 2021. School closures and remote education have posed some difficulties for both students and teachers. A qualitative study and the semi-structured interview method was chosen to collect hospital teachers' insights into their work experiences during the pandemic. The sample consisted of 21 participants who worked as hospital school teachers. The study revealed the following thematic areas: introduction of remote/hybrid teaching (Frequency=8), lack of the sense of employment stability (F=4), limited contact with students (F=6), necessity to adapt to dynamically changing conditions (F=3), sedentary character of work (F=3), improvement of the quality of work and work conditions (F=4). The research was conducted as part of the Back to School Project (project number: 2019-1-PL01-KA201-065602), with funding from Erasmus+. The data collected during the study will be used to create guidebooks for both hospital school and mainstream school teachers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitals , Humans , Schools
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686720

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to elaborate and validate a scale for the evaluation of the teachers' attitude towards quality management, by integrating elements of online education. Nine hundred and forty-two teachers from Romania have participated in the study. The exploratory factor analysis has led to the identification of three main dimensions of the scale: (1) communication and alignment; (2) needs and opportunities; and (3) training and support. Teachers participating in managing positions or in quality assurance boards indicated a more positive attitude towards the three components. Furthermore, teachers of a higher teaching experience reported higher values in the needs and opportunities component. The results are useful to educational institutions, program designers and policy makers to evaluate the teachers' attitude towards quality management.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , Attitude , Humans , Romania , Schools
12.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614004

ABSTRACT

The role of schools as a source of infection and driver in the coronavirus-pandemic has been controversial and is still not completely clarified. To prevent harm and disadvantages for children and adolescents, but also adults, detailed data on school outbreaks is needed, especially when talking about open schools employing evidence-based safety concepts. Here, we investigated the first significant COVID-19 school outbreak in Hamburg, Germany, after the re-opening of schools in 2020. Using clinical, laboratory, and contact data and spatial measures for epidemiological and environmental studies combined with whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis, we examined the causes and the course of the secondary school outbreak. The potential index case was identified by epidemiological tracking and the lessons in classrooms with presumably high virus spreading rates and further infection chains in the setting. Sequence analysis of samples detected one sample of a different virus lineage and 25 virus genomes with almost identical sequences, of which 21 showed 100% similarity. Most infections occurred in connection with two lesson units of the primary case. Likely, 31 students (12-14 years old), two staff members, and three family members were infected in the school or the typical household. Sequence analysis revealed an outbreak cluster with a single source that was epidemiologically identified as a member of the educational staff. In lesson units, two superspreading events of varying degrees with airborne transmission took place. These were influenced by several parameters including the exposure times, the use of respiratory masks while speaking and spatial or structural conditions at that time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Schools , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Contact Tracing , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Educational Personnel , Family , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Phylogeny , Quarantine , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561277

ABSTRACT

It has been suggested that mindfulness is a predictive factor in self-reported perceived stress. The present study aimed to investigate the link between mindful attention awareness, perceived stress and subjective wellbeing without the presence of a complementary intervention to promote mindfulness-based strategies. METHODS: The online survey participants (N = 257) were university students enrolled in initial teacher training. Self-report measures included the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI). RESULTS: PWI was negatively correlated with PSS (r = -0.550, p = .001), MAAS was negatively correlated with PSS (r = -0.567, p = .001) and positively correlated with PWI (r = 0.336, p = .001). The mean score for PSS (M = 20.61, SD = 6.62) was above the reported norm (14.2). CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that higher levels of mindful attention awareness may be associated with lower levels of perceived stress and higher subjective wellbeing levels and lower levels of perceived stress may be associated with higher subjective wellbeing. The findings confirm that pre-service teachers are a demographic that experiences elevated levels of perceived stress regardless of the stage in initial teacher training programs.


Subject(s)
Educational Personnel , Mindfulness , Attention , Awareness , Humans , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Sch Psychol ; 36(6): 516-532, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514394

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic extensively changed the work life of many employees. Teachers seemed particularly challenged, confronted with sudden remote teaching due to school closures. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, we investigated (a) changes in seven work characteristics (job demands: emotional demands, interpersonal conflict, workload; job resources: autonomy, social support, feedback, task variety) and three job-related well-being indicators (fatigue, psychosomatic complaints, job satisfaction), (b) how changes in work characteristics correlated with well-being, and (c) the impact of two individual difference factors (caretaking responsibilities, career stage). Data were collected in two waves (just prior to and a few months into the COVID-19 pandemic) across Germany from 207 teachers with an average work experience of 6 years (range: 1-36 years). Using latent change score (LCS) modeling, we found significant, small-to-medium-sized decreases over time for both job demands and resources as well as fatigue, with variability in the magnitude of changes. Decreases in job demands correlated with decreases in fatigue and psychosomatic complaints, whereas decreases in job resources correlated with decreases in job satisfaction. Teachers with caretaking responsibilities and more experienced teachers were more vulnerable to the crisis as they experienced a smaller or no decrease in job demands in concert with diminished job resources. These findings reveal the double-edged consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for teachers' work life. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488548

ABSTRACT

The confinement experienced due to the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a rethink of the teaching-learning process to which teachers have responded without planning and instead used their resources. This study aimed to analyze the relationships between work-family interactions, technostress, and perceived organizational support in teachers during the confinement period in Spain that began in March 2020. An online survey was administered to 640 pre-school, primary, and secondary school teachers. Positive reciprocal work-family interactions and their relationship with organizational support were found, with differences according to gender, with women showing a more negative perception of the impact on the family. There were no marked levels of technostress in the overall sample, although higher levels of perceived ineffectiveness and skepticism were found in teachers aged 46 years or older. Teachers in private and subsidized schools showed a higher level of perceived support than those in public schools. There is a need to continue this work to verify the values of these dimensions in other contexts and to apply institutional measures and public policies to improve these indicators in this group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Personnel , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , School Teachers
17.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(11): 100452, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483013

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission in K-12 schools was rare during in 2020-2021; few studies included Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-recommended screening of asymptomatic individuals. We conduct a prospective observational study of SARS-CoV-2 screening in a mid-sized suburban public school district to evaluate the incidence of asymptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), document frequency of in-school transmission, and characterize barriers and facilitators to asymptomatic screening in schools. Staff and students undergo weekly pooled testing using home-collected saliva samples. Identification of >1 case in a school prompts investigation for in-school transmission and enhancement of safety strategies. With layered mitigation measures, in-school transmission even before student or staff vaccination is rare. Screening identifies a single cluster with in-school staff-to-staff transmission, informing decisions about in-person learning. The proportion of survey respondents self-reporting comfort with in-person learning before versus after implementation of screening increases. Costs exceed $260,000 for assays alone; staff and volunteers spend 135-145 h per week implementing screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Mass Screening , Schools , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Educational Personnel , Humans , Prospective Studies , Students , United States
18.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258137, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448582

ABSTRACT

Online education, including college English education, has been developing rapidly in the recent decade in China. Such aspects as e-readiness, benefits and challenges of online education were well-researched under normal situations, but fully online language teaching on a large-scale in emergencies may tell a different story. A survey of 2310 non-English-major college students and 149 English teachers from three types of twelve higher education institutions in Wuhan was conducted to evaluate their readiness for online English education during the COVID-19 pandemic, to figure out challenges encountered by them and to draw implications for future online college English education. Quantitative statistics gathered using two readiness scales adapted from previous studies showed that both cohorts were slightly below the ready level for the unexpected online transition of college English education. The overall level of readiness for students was 3.68 out of a score of 5, and that for teachers was 3.70. Individual differences were explored and reported. An analysis of qualitative results summarized six categories of challenges encountered by the students, i.e. technical challenges, challenges concerning learning process, learning environment, self-control, efficiency and effectiveness, and health concern. Though the students reported the highest level of readiness in technology access, they were most troubled by technical problems during online study. For teachers, among three types of challenges, they were most frustrated by pedagogical ones, especially students' disengagement in online class. The survey brought insights for online college English education development. Institutions should take the initiative and continue promoting the development of online college English education, because a majority of the respondents reported their willingness and intention to continue learning/teaching English in online or blended courses in the post-pandemic period. They are supposed to remove technical barriers for teachers and students, and assess the readiness levels of both cohorts before launching English courses online. Institutions should also arrange proper training for instructors involved, especially about pedagogical issues. Language teachers are suggested to pay special attention to students' engagement and communication in online courses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel/psychology , Students/psychology , Academic Performance , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Language , Learning , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 388-397, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442724

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) has had multifaceted effects on students, their families, and the educators who support their learning. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the most notable changes for schools was the sudden move to distance learning-an unprecedented disruption to academic, social, and emotional instruction. Social and emotional learning (SEL) skills play an important role in human development by supporting academic success and overall well-being, including skills for effectively coping with stressors such as those imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Building on previous work, we created the Crisis Response Educator SEL Survey (CRESS) to examine predictors of SEL implementation during the pandemic. Structural equation models (SEMs) were used to predict: (a) educators' reported challenges implementing SEL during distance learning; (b) educator SEL implementation with students and use of social and emotional (SE) strategies for themselves; and (c) educator self-judgment and emotional exhaustion. Predictors included school/district guidance to support SEL, school/district support of educator SE needs, and the priority on SEL for the school and the educator. Our sample consisted of 219 educators committed to SEL who reported on their experience with SEL during distance learning toward the end of the 2019-2020 school year. Findings suggest that school/district support of educator SE needs predicts lower levels of challenge implementing SEL during distance learning and lower levels of educator burnout and self-judgment, whereas greater school/district guidance to support SEL was associated with more SEL implementation with students and more educator use of SE strategies for themselves. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Personnel , Emotions , Schools , Social Learning , Teaching , Adult , Aged , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Educational Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 427-431, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442729

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disrupted the way of life for humans all around the world. As the consequences continue to be revealed, it has been abundantly clear that the pandemic has disproportionately impacted communities of color. The COVID-19 pandemic shined a magnifying glass on racially based structural inequities in a manner that was impossible to unsee or to look away. COVID-19 disrupted education norms-from forcing online classroom instruction models to hindering our reliance on standardized testing. Education is already rife with evidence of systemic racism as its foundation. Disproportionality in special education, disproportionate punitive discipline, underrepresentation in highly capable learning problems are well established structures that maintain systemic racism in education (Diamond, 2018). As systemic racism is embedded in all of our social and environmental contexts, it is easy to conclude that systemic racism and COVID-19 are not just coexisting, they are interacting to exacerbate negative outcomes for communities of color. This commentary addresses the disproportionate impact of the dual pandemics: COVID-19 and systemic racism. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Personnel , Racism , Schools , Students , Child , Humans
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