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1.
Clin Nurs Res ; 32(6): 971-982, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238506

ABSTRACT

High rates of COVID-19 infection and lower vaccination rates among young adults aged 18 to 26 in the United States prompted this study to examine motivating factors and barriers to COVID-19 vaccination and identify preferences in COVID-19 vaccine education. Three focus group discussions were completed. Transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three key themes were identified including (1) motivating factors to vaccination, (2) barriers to vaccination, and (3) COVID-19 vaccination educational intervention design recommendations. Motivating factors included five relevant subthemes: civic duty, fear related to the disease process; fear related to emerging variants and breakthroughs; fear regarding the suffering of others; and freedom. Barriers included four subthemes: lack of trust, misinformation, politics, and pressure. Attempts to further educate young adults about the COVID-19 vaccine should consider strategies that target motivating factors and barriers while also making accurate information accessible through social media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Young Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Educational Status , Fear , Vaccination
2.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 34(2): 135-141, 2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237739

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The expansion of health professions educational programs has led to an acute shortage of available clinical training sites. Rapid growth in the number of medical schools, physician assistant (PA) programs, and advanced nurse practitioner (APRN) programs, all of which share a need for similar types of clinical training experiences, has increased competition for clinical training sites and placed new challenges on educational institutions. Solutions are urgently needed to increase the quantity and quality of supervised clinical practice experiences as well as to ensure diversity among preceptors and geographical clinical sites. This article identifies key barriers to securing sufficient clinical training sites, notes emerging trends, and presents potential innovations through stakeholder collaboration for enhancing clinical training across health professions.


Subject(s)
Physician Assistants , Preceptorship , Humans , Physician Assistants/education , Educational Status , Curriculum , Schools
3.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0287143, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237505

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the association between public perception of the appropriateness of management strategies implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic and the level of disturbances in daily activities reported by the general population. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used Korea Community Health Survey conducted from August to November 2020. Public perception of COVID-19 management strategies included those implemented by the government (central, city or provincial, and administrative districts), the mass media, regional medical institutions, and neighbors. The subjective level of disturbances in daily activities was measured using a 0-100 numeric rating scale developed by Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used. A subgroup analysis was conducted based on education level. RESULTS: The present study analyzed 211,353 participants. Compared to individuals who perceived that the management strategies implemented during the pandemic was 'highly appropriate,' those who reported 'mediocre appropriateness' (ß: -1.96, p-value: <0.001) or 'low appropriateness' (ß: -3.60, p-value: 0.010) reported higher levels of subjective disturbances. The appropriateness of measures implemented by the mass media was associated with levels of subjective disturbances felt by individuals of lower education with statistical significance, whereas that applied by the mass media and the government were important in those with higher education. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the importance of public perception of management strategies when implementing containment policies and minimizing its disturbances on daily lives is essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Public Opinion , Educational Status
4.
Psychiatr Rehabil J ; 46(2): 163-167, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236233

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this preliminary exploratory study was to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the career development of diverse individuals with psychiatric disabilities. METHODS: Four hundred sixty-nine individuals with psychiatric disabilities and 147 individuals without psychiatric disabilities completed survey questions regarding their employment and educational experiences during the pandemic. We utilized chi-square analyses to explore the differences between those with and without psychiatric disabilities and between racial groups. RESULTS: Our results indicated that individuals with psychiatric disabilities, especially Black, Indigenous, and other people of color (BIPOC), experienced greater employment-related uncertainty during the COVID-19 pandemic than the population without psychiatric disabilities. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Individuals with psychiatric disabilities, particularly BIPOC, need access to more stable employment and supports to maintain their employment. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Humans , Pandemics , Employment , Educational Status
5.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286642, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236190

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the accompanying hygiene regulations, medical students in Germany faced multiple educational and personal challenges. The challenges included the cancellation and digitalisation of courses, the closing of university institutions such as libraries, a decrease in social contacts, and the risk of a Covid-19 infection. The aim of this study was to understand medical students' pandemic experiences as well as the consequences of these experiences for the students' future work as physicians. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed 15 guided, one-on-one interviews with clinical medical students (third to fifth year) at the Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and anonymised. We performed a qualitative content analysis in accordance with Mayring and thereby formed an inductive category system. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) were applied. RESULTS: Five categories were inductively formed: "Changes in the teaching experience", "negative effects on the learning experience", "decrease in personal social contacts", "contact with covid-19", and "pandemic-associated stress increase". The participating students reported higher levels of stress due to isolation and uncertainty regarding their educational future. Furthermore, students welcomed the digitalisation of lectures, developed individual coping strategies, and voluntarily took part in the care of Covid-19 patients. Limitations to social interactions were perceived as the major restrictive factor to their educational structure, their perceived learning success and personal development. CONCLUSION: This study identified social restrictions as well as didactic and academic structural challenges as relevant factors contributing to perceived stress and fear for medical students during the Covid-19 pandemic, especially as regards their learning experience. Students' acceptance of digitalised learning may enable regular interaction with university peers and may facilitate a structured educational life. However, the implementation of digital resources could not provide a sufficient substitute for in-person courses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Status
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 23(1): 402, 2023 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235963

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels of adherence among pregnant women to the basic COVID-19 preventive measures, and to analyze the effect of risk perception and sociodemographic and clinical factors on adherence. METHOD: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted at the obstetrics clinics of 50 primary care centers selected using a multistage sampling method. An online-administered, structured questionnaire was used to collect self-reported levels of adherence to four basic preventive measures against COVID-19, along with perceived COVID-19 severity, infectiousness, and harmfulness to the baby, besides sociodemographic and clinical data including obstetrical and other medical history. RESULTS: A total of 2460 pregnant women were included with a mean (SD) age of 30.21 (6.11) years. Levels of self-reported compliance were highest for hand hygiene (95.7%), followed by social distancing (92.3%), masking (90.0%), and avoidance of contact with a COVID-19 infected person (70.3%). Perceived COVID-19 severity and infectiousness, and harmfulness to the baby were observed in 89.2%, 70.7%, and 85.0% of the participants, respectively, and were variably associated with compliance to preventive measures. Analysis of sociodemographic factors highlighted the significance of education and economic status in determining adherence to preventive measures, which represents a potential inequity in the risk of COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of patients' education to enable functional perception of COVID-19 that promotes self-efficacy, besides investigating the specific social determinants of health to tackle inequalities in terms of prevention efficiency and the subsequent health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy , Infant , Humans , Female , Adult , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pregnant Women , Educational Status
7.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 54(6): 275-280, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235848

ABSTRACT

Failure to rescue is prevalent among patients with traumatic injury who are admitted to medical-surgical units. These units are traditionally staffed by new graduate nurses who require mentorship and ongoing continuing education. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic prompted nurse educators to develop and implement new methods of providing routine and just-in-time education in the hospital setting. This article describes a trauma-focused educational program with live sessions and online educational activities created with survey software. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2023;54(6):275-280.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Curriculum , Educational Status
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 371, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way medical education is delivered. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the education and procedural volume of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, internet-based, voluntary, anonymous, national survey of adult critical care fellows and academic attending physicians in critical care and pulmonary critical care fellowship programs in the United States between December 2020 and February 2021. Survey questions covered both didactic and non-didactic aspects of education and procedural volumes. Answers were ranked on a 5-point Likert scale. Survey responses were summarized by frequency with percentage. Differences between the responses of fellows and attendings were assessed with the Fisher's exact or Chi-Square test, using Stata 16 software (StataCorp LLC, College Station, TX). RESULTS: Seventy four individuals responded to the survey; the majority (70.3%) were male; less than one-third (28.4%) female. Respondents were evenly split among fellows (52.7%) and attendings (47.3%). 41.9% of survey respondents were from the authors' home institution, with a response rate of 32.6%. Almost two-thirds (62.2%) reported that fellows spend more time in the ICU since the onset of the pandemic. The majority noted that fellows insert more central venous catheters (52.7%) and arterial lines (58.1%), but perform fewer bronchoscopies (59.5%). The impact on endotracheal intubations was mixed: almost half of respondents (45.9%) reported fewer intubations, about one-third (35.1%) more intubations. Almost all respondents (93.0%) described fewer workshops; and one-third (36.1%) fewer didactic lectures. The majority (71.2%) noted less time available for research and quality improvement projects; half (50.7%) noted less bedside teaching by faculty and more than one-third (37.0%) less fellow interaction with faculty. Almost one-half of respondents (45.2%) reported an increase in fellows' weekly work hours. CONCLUSION: The pandemic has caused a decrease in scholarly and didactic activities of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows. Fellows spend more time in ICU rotations, insert more central and arterial lines, but perform fewer intubations and bronchoscopies. This survey provides insights into changes that have occurred in the training of critical care and pulmonary critical care fellows since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Female , Male , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Status , Critical Care
9.
Health Lit Res Pract ; 7(2): e111-e118, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multimedia videos are important tools to inform uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. Video design using health literacy guidelines may help optimize video usefulness. Many health organizations (HO) (provides information) and health care (HCO) (provides direct health care) organizations have used YouTube to deliver videos about COVID-19 vaccines. OBJECTIVE: We examined HO and HCO COVID-19 vaccine videos shown on YouTube for health literacy guidelines (quality, understandability and actionability). METHODS: The top 30 most viewed COVID-19 vaccine videos posted by HO and HCO were analyzed using the Global Quality Score (GQS) and the Patient Education Assessment Tool for evaluating audiovisual formats (PEMAT-AV). KEY RESULTS: GQS scores averaged 3.12 (standard deviation [SD] .789), which is equivalent to 80%. Using PEMATAV, there was a relationship between actionability and quality (r(28) = .453, p < .05) for HO; for HCO, there was a relationship between usability and quality (r(28) = .455, p < .05). Odds ratio analysis showed quality in HO leading to higher odds of actionability (3.573, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.480-14.569]) and quality in HCO videos leading to higher understandability (4.093, CI [1.203-17.865]). CONCLUSION: Few organizations applied all health literacy principles to video design. Video creation for mass media health campaigns by HO and HCO should include consideration of evidence-based health literacy measures (quality, understandability, actionability) to ensure intended results across viewers with different health literacy levels including communities who have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. [HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice. 2023;7(2):e111-e118.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Biological Transport , Educational Status
10.
Burns ; 49(4): 757-769, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235187

ABSTRACT

Self-immolation is the act of setting fire to oneself. Recent spikes in self-immolation events have been noticed in the Arab world, specifically in the aftermath of the Arab Spring in 2011. We aimed to examine the literature assessing the characteristics and patterns of suicide by self-immolation in the Arab world. We registered our systematic review in Prospero. We searched PubMed, Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, and Scopus databases from inception until 9 July 2022, along with other sources, following the PRISMA 2020 guidelines. We collected relevant articles tackling suicide by self-immolation in the Arab world via title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening. We then conducted a narrative synthesis of the results. Out of 326 records from databases and 17 additional records identified through other sources, 31 articles (27 quantitative and 4 qualitative) were included. The studies came from Iraq (n = 16), Tunisia (n = 6), Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (n = 3), Jordan (n = 2), Libya (n = 2), Bahrain (n = 1), and Egypt (n = 1). The quantitative studies had a sample size ranging from 22 to 600 self-inflicted burn victims. Studies showed that self-immolators were mostly married women with low educational level and low socioeconomic status. Self-immolation was more likely to happen at home, usually following marital conflicts. Kerosene was the accelerant used the most. Depression was the most comorbid mental health diagnosis. Studies highlighted that self-immolation was being increasignly used as a form of protest. Self-immolation is not uncommon in the Arab world. Specific interventions directed at the population at risk are warranted.


Subject(s)
Burns , Suicide , Humans , Female , Arab World , Burns/epidemiology , Burns/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Marriage , Educational Status
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 421, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The forced transition to emergency remote teaching (ERT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted health professions education worldwide. In Sweden, the need for alternative solutions for the training of junior doctors became urgent, as many of the mandatory onsite courses required for residents to qualify as specialists were canceled. The purpose of this study was to understand course leaders' perceptions and experiences of using digital technologies, such as video conferencing, to teach medical residents (ST) during the pandemic and beyond. METHODS: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with seven course leaders responsible for residency courses during the first year of the pandemic to capture their perceptions and experiences. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis, drawing on the technology affordances and constraints theory (TACT) as a framework to explore pedagogical strategies and new teaching practices emerging from the forced use of digital technologies for remote teaching. RESULTS: The data analysis revealed affordances of, as well as constraints to, teaching specialist medical training during the pandemic. The findings show that the use of digital conference technologies for ERT can both enable and inhibit social interactions, the interactive learning environment and the utilization of technological features, depending on the individual course leaders' goals of using the technology and the situated context of the teaching. CONCLUSIONS: The study reflects the course leaders' pedagogical response to the pandemic, as remote teaching became the only way to provide residency education. Initially, the sudden shift was perceived as constraining, but over time they found new affordances through the enforced use of digital technology that helped them not only to cope with the transition but also to innovate their pedagogical methods. After a rapid, forced shift from on-site to digital courses, it is crucial to utilize experiences to create better preconditions for digital technology to facilitate learning in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Status , Learning
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 436, 2023 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After the Coronavirus pandemic, many educational routines were stopped for the safety of medical staff. To achieve educational goals, we have implemented new policies in our hospitals. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of such strategies. METHOD: This survey-based study uses questionnaires to assess newly implemented educational strategies. We surveyed 107 medical staff of the orthopedic department of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, including faculty members, residents, and students. The survey contained three series of questionnaires for these groups. RESULTS: The maximum satisfaction for all three groups was observed in the platform and facilities for using e-classes, and the cost- and time-saving capabilities (Respectively, faculty members (FM): 81.8%, residents (R): 95.2%, students/interns (S/I): 87.0%; FM: 90.9%, R: 88.1%, S/I: 81.5%). The new policies have been shown to reduce the stress level of most trainees, increase the quality of knowledge-based education, increase the opportunity for reexamining educational content, expand discussion and research opportunities, and improve work conditions. There was a broad acceptance of the virtual journal clubs and morning reports. However, there were discrepancies between residents and faculty members on issues such as the evaluation of trainees, the new educational curriculum, and flexible shift schedules. Our strategies failed to improve skill-based education and patient treatment status. Most participants indicated that e-learning should be used with face-to-face training post-pandemic (FM: 81.8%, R: 83.3%, S/I: 75.9%). CONCLUSION: Our efforts to optimize the educational system during this crisis have generally improved trainees' work conditions and educational experience. Most participants believed that e-learning and virtual methods should be used alongside traditional training as a complementary component after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Iran/epidemiology , Educational Status
13.
Am J Health Behav ; 47(2): 253-260, 2023 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242938

ABSTRACT

Objective: Past infection with COVID-19 increases the risk of occurrence of thromboembolic events in veins and arteries, respiratory failure, and damage to the heart muscle, liver, and nervous system. Pro-health behaviors of patients who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2 are the determinant of maintaining and strengthening the state of health. We assessed health behaviors of convalescent patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection and determined the relationships between these behaviors and the selected social and demographic characteristics.Methods: The study included 125 patients who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2; we used the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI), and an author-constructed questionnaire.Results: Overall, 60.8% of respondents presented a mediocre level of health behaviors (5-6 stens), 24.8% low (1-4 stens), and 14.4% high (7-10 stens). We found the highest mean value in the case of one HBI category: positive psychological attitude (3.51±0.67), followed by prophylactic behaviors (3.42±0.73), and correct eating habits (3.36±0.84). The lowest value (demonstrating the least pro-health behavior of respondents) concerned health practices (3.23±0.78).Conclusions: COVID-19 convalescent patients presented a mediocre set of health behaviors. We found statistically significant relationships between health behaviors by education and age. Persons who have had SARS-CoV-2 should receive health education in all areas of health behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Behavior , Health Education , Educational Status
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241138

ABSTRACT

Not much is known about how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the labor market experiences of people with disabilities. Since they constitute a generally disadvantaged group in the labor market, it is important to scrutinize whether their position has worsened during these difficult times and how they reacted with regard to their job search behavior. We therefore used data for the year 2020 from a large German panel (Panel Arbeitsmarkt und Soziale Sicherung, PASS), in order to scrutinize the prevalence of unemployment among people with disabilities (N = 739) during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The factors that affected their unemployment status were also analyzed. The study found that people with legally recognized disabilities were more often unemployed than non-disabled people, even when controlling for possible confounding factors such as age, gender, or education. This effect was significant for severe disabilities and marginally significant for minor disabilities. Additionally, the type of disability affected the probability of being unemployed, with cardiovascular diseases, mental illnesses, and musculoskeletal disorders carrying a higher risk. In terms of job-seeking behavior, unemployed people with disabilities reported using some job search methods more frequently than their non-disabled counterparts. However, the intensity of the job search did not differ significantly between the two groups. Further differences were found when analyzing the reasons for abstinence from searching for a job, with unemployed people with disabilities primarily citing health-related factors (with a frequency of over 90%). In summary, health played a pivotal role in determining disabled people's labor market experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Humans , Unemployment , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Educational Status
15.
Public Health Rep ; 138(1_suppl): 63S-71S, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240694

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic affected consumers' access to oral health care. This study evaluated factors associated with teledentistry use among US adults from June 2019 through June 2020. METHODS: We used data from a nationally representative survey of 3500 consumers. We estimated teledentistry use and adjusted associations with respondents' concerns about the impacts of the pandemic on health and welfare and with their sociodemographic characteristics using Poisson regression models. We also analyzed teledentistry use across 5 teledentistry modalities (email, telephone, text, video conferencing, and mobile application). RESULTS: Overall, 29% of respondents used teledentistry, and 68% of teledentistry users reported doing so for the first time because of the COVID-19 pandemic. First-time teledentistry use was positively associated with a high level of pandemic concerns (relative risk [RR] = 5.02; 95% CI, 3.49-7.20), age 35-44 years (RR = 4.22; 95% CI, 2.89-6.17), and annual household income $100 000-$124 999 (RR = 2.10; 95% CI, 1.55-2.84) and negatively associated with rural residence (RR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50-0.94). Having a high level of pandemic concerns (RR = 3.42; 95% CI, 2.30-5.08), young age (age 25-34 years: RR = 5.05; 95% CI, 3.23-7.90), and higher level of education (some college: RR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.22-2.07) were strongly associated with teledentistry use for all "other" users (ie, existing or first-time use because of reasons unrelated to the pandemic). Most first-time teledentistry users used email (74.2%) and mobile applications (73.9%), whereas "other" teledentistry users used telephone communication (41.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Teledentistry use during the pandemic was higher in the general population than among those for whom teledentistry programs were originally designed (eg, low-income, rural populations). Favorable regulatory changes to teledentistry should be expanded to meet patient needs beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communication , Educational Status
16.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 31: e3911, 2023.
Article in Spanish, English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240338

ABSTRACT

to map the knowledge produced about the repercussions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic on Nursing training. this is a Scoping Review, guided by the recommendations set forth in the Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewer's Manual and carried out in 15 electronic databases and theses and dissertations repositories. The protocol was registered at the Open Science Framework. The data were analyzed and synthesized into two pre-established analysis categories: positive and negative repercussions; and descriptive statistics. 33 publications identified, the most cited positive aspects were the development of new teaching strategies adapted to the virtual environment and the training of future professionals in clinical practice in the context of a health crisis. The negative repercussions are related to psychological issues such as increase in the cases of anxiety, stress and loneliness among the students. the diverse evidence suggests that remote teaching was a timely emergency way out for the continuity of academic training; however, this educational modality presented positive and negative aspects that need to be rethought for a better systematization of teaching-learning in other contexts that resemble the COVID-19 pandemic.


mapear el conocimiento producido sobre las repercusiones de la pandemia de COVID-19 en la formación en enfermería. se trata de una scoping review, guiada por las recomendaciones del Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewer's Manual realizada en 15 bases de datos electrónicas y repositorios de tesis y disertaciones. El protocolo de esta revisión fue registrado en Open Science Framework. Los datos fueron analizados y sintetizados en dos categorías de análisis establecidas: aspectos positivos y negativos y estadística descriptiva. se identificaron 33 publicaciones, los aspectos positivos más citados fueron el desarrollo de nuevas estrategias de enseñanza adaptadas al entorno virtual y la formación de futuros profesionales en la práctica clínica en el contexto de una crisis sanitaria. Los aspectos negativos se relacionan con cuestiones psicológicas, como el aumento de casos de ansiedad, estrés y soledad en los estudiantes. la evidencia sugiere que la enseñanza a distancia fue una solución de emergencia oportuna para continuar con la formación académica, sin embargo, esta modalidad educativa presentó aspectos positivos y negativos que deben ser repensados para que haya una mejor sistematización de la enseñanza-aprendizaje en otros contextos similares al de la pandemia de COVID-19.


(1) Mapeó la evidencia científica de las repercusiones de la pandemia en la formación en enfermería. (2) Destacó las repercusiones positivas y negativas de la pandemia en la formación en enfermería. (3) Destacó la importancia de la formación en enfermería en el contexto de la pandemia. (4) Señaló la necesidad de formar docentes para la enseñanza a distancia en enfermería.


mapear o conhecimento produzido sobre as repercussões da pandemia COVID-19 na formação em Enfermagem. trata-se de uma scoping review, guiada pelas recomendações da Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewer's Manual realizada em 15 bases de dados eletrônicas e repositórios de teses e dissertações. O protocolo desta revisão foi registrado em Open Science Framework. Os dados foram analisados e sintetizados em duas categorias de análise estabelecidas: aspectos positivos e negativos e estatística descritiva. 33 publicações identificadas, os aspectos positivos mais citados foram o desenvolvimento de novas estratégias de ensino adaptadas ao meio virtual e a capacitação dos futuros profissionais na prática clínica do contexto de crise sanitária. Os aspectos negativos estão relacionados às questões psicológicas, como aumento de casos de ansiedade, estresse e solidão entre os estudantes. as evidências sugerem que o ensino remoto foi uma saída emergencial oportuna para a continuidade da formação acadêmica, contudo, esta modalidade educacional apresentou aspectos positivos e negativos que precisam ser repensados para uma melhor sistematização do ensino-aprendizagem em outros contextos que se assemelhem ao da pandemia da COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Learning , Students , Educational Status
17.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 8360, 2023 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239521

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are useful tools to combat the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, but vaccine reluctance threatens these vaccines' effectiveness. To address COVID-19 vaccine reluctance and ensure equitable distribution, understanding the extent of and factors associated with vaccine acceptance and uptake is critical. We report the results of a large nationwide study in the US conducted December 2020-May 2021 of 36,711 users from COVID-19-focused smartphone-based app How We Feel on their willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. We identified sociodemographic and behavioral factors that were associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake, and we found several vulnerable groups at increased risk of COVID-19 burden, morbidity, and mortality were more likely to be reluctant to accept a vaccine and had lower rates of vaccination. Our findings highlight specific populations in which targeted efforts to develop education and outreach programs are needed to overcome poor vaccine acceptance and improve equitable access, diversity, and inclusion in the national response to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , Educational Status
18.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1016, 2023 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic as a public health crisis has led to a significant increase in mental health difficulties. Smoking is strongly associated with mental health conditions, which is why the pandemic might have influenced the otherwise decline in smoking rates. Persons belonging to socioeconomically disadvantaged groups may be particularly affected, both because the pandemic has exacerbated existing social inequalities and because this group was more likely to smoke before the pandemic. We examined smoking prevalence in a French cohort study, focusing on differences between educational attainment. In addition, we examined the association between interpersonal changes in tobacco consumption and educational level from 2018 to 2021. METHODS: Using four assessments of smoking status available from 2009 to 2021, we estimated smoking prevalence over time, stratified by highest educational level in the TEMPO cohort and the difference was tested using chi2 test. We studied the association between interpersonal change in smoking status between 2018 and 2021 and educational attainment among 148 smokers, using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: Smoking prevalence was higher among those with low education. The difference between the two groups increased from 2020 to 2021 (4.8-9.4%, p < 0.001). Smokers with high educational level were more likely to decrease their tobacco consumption from 2018 to 2021 compared to low educated smokers (aOR = 2.72 [1.26;5.89]). CONCLUSION: Current findings showed a widening of the social inequality gap in relation to smoking rates, underscoring the increased vulnerability of persons with low educational level to smoking and the likely inadequate focus on social inequalities in relation to tobacco control policies during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Cohort Studies , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Socioeconomic Factors , Educational Status , Smoking/epidemiology , Prevalence
19.
Soc Sci Med ; 328: 116003, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20230992

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted population well-being in the United States, exacerbating existing racial and socioeconomic inequalities in health and mortality. Importantly, as the pandemic disrupted the provision of vital preventive health screenings for cardiometabolic diseases and cancers, more research is needed to understand whether this disruption had an unequal impact across racialized and socioeconomic lines. We draw on the 2019 and 2021 National Health Interview Survey to explore whether the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to racialized and schooling inequalities in the reception of preventive screenings for cardiometabolic diseases and cancers. We find striking evidence that Asian Americans, and to a lesser extent Hispanic and Black Americans, reported decreased reception of many types of cardiometabolic and cancer screenings in 2021 relative to 2019. Moreover, we find that across schooling groups, those with a bachelor's degree or higher experienced the greatest decline in screening reception for most cardiometabolic diseases and cancers, and those with less than a high school degree experienced the greatest decline in screening reception for diabetes. Findings have important implications for health inequalities and U.S. population health in the coming decades. Research and health policy attention should be directed toward ensuring that preventive health care is a key priority for public health, particularly among socially marginalized groups who may be at increased risk of delayed diagnosis for screenable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Educational Status , Preventive Health Services , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control
20.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 302: 498-499, 2023 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322945

ABSTRACT

International student exchange is a valuable opportunity for Biomedical and Health Informatics students to gain new perspectives and experiences. In the past, such exchanges have been made possible through international partnerships between universities. Unfortunately, numerous obstacles such as housing, financial concerns, and environmental implications related to travel, have made it difficult to continue international exchange. Experiences with hybrid and online education during covid-19 paved the way for a new approach that allows for short international exchange with a hybrid online-offline supervision model. This will be initiated with an exploration project between two international universities , each related to their respective institute's research focus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Humans , Medical Informatics/education , Health Education , Students , Educational Status
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