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1.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 423-426, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247399

ABSTRACT

Little has been published regarding postgraduate assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need to graduate well-trained specialists including family physicians who play a key role in patient care. The successes and challenges encountered in mounting qualifying 2020 Family Medicine examinations during the COVID-19 pandemic at the University of the West Indies are described in this paper. Human resource, planning, use of technology and virtual environments are discussed, which enabled successful examinations at this multicampus regional site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Family Practice/education , Physicians, Family/standards , Academic Performance , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/methods , Certification/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching/standards , Teaching/trends , West Indies
2.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 953-957, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177693

ABSTRACT

This study explored older adults' technology use patterns and attitudes toward virtual volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. A 22-item survey was administered to 229 volunteers in the St. Louis region who tutor children through the Oasis Intergenerational Tutoring program. Although most respondents are familiar with technology and expressed that they are likely to volunteer virtually, their responses varied significantly by age, education, gender, income, and school districts. Some tutors expressed that virtual volunteering may eliminate barriers to in-person volunteering, while others were concerned with establishing a personal connection with students online. These findings suggest that tutors anticipate both benefits and challenges with virtual volunteering and that efforts to engage older adults during the pandemic should factor in prior use of technology and ensure that different subgroups are not marginalized.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Technology/methods , Social Participation/psychology , Teaching , Volunteers/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Intergenerational Relations , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Missouri , Teaching/psychology , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
3.
Compr Child Adolesc Nurs ; 44(1): 6-14, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118889

ABSTRACT

The declaration of a global pandemic in March 2020 resulted in all higher education institutions having to quickly transform traditional didactic teaching and learning to online delivery. This involved delivering lectures and seminars virtually, and student contact time in University ceased immediately. Although many Universities had existing resources such as Blackboard® and Microsoft Teams® in place to assist with this delivery, the facilitation of clinical skills and simulation would prove to be more of a challenge. This paper explores how one University adapted and utilized innovative ways to provide students with virtual learning experiences, specifically in relation to the facilitation of clinical skills and simulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Technology/methods , Patient Simulation , Students, Health Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Humans
4.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 427-431, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033472

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted education-related activities, including the conduct of examinations. We review the literature regarding high-stakes examinations during the pandemic, discuss the decision-making process of whether to proceed with a high-stakes examination and share published experiences in conducting high-stakes examinations during the pandemic. We illustrate our own recent experiences of decision-making and conduct of our high-stakes gastroenterology licencing examinations during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is possible to conduct high-stakes examinations virtually during pandemic situations with fidelity and adherence to the established format and standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement/methods , Gastroenterology/education , Licensure/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
5.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1151): 590-597, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the crucial time of coronavirus pandemic, education is being remodelled: opening the doors of electronic learning (e-learning). The review emphasises on the various e-learning methods that can be used in the current scenario. METHODS: The review was based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines on databases, namely, PubMed, Google Scholar and Cochrane. Out of 1524 identified articles, after the process of screening and based on the eligibility criteria, 45 full-text articles were reviewed. RESULTS: Though there are many caveats on the path of successful implementation this is the right time that we step towards e-learning. The article discusses the methods and tools in e-learning that can modify the traditional ways of content delivery, record maintenance, assessment and feedback. CONCLUSION: During the period of 'planet arrest', when the whole world is locked down with the motive of social distancing, let us stay connected with e-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Computer Communication Networks , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Phys Med ; 80: 10-16, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838770

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We present the implementation of e-learning in the Master of Medical Physics programme at the University of Malaya during a partial lockdown from March to June 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Teaching and Learning (T&L) activities were conducted virtually on e-learning platforms. The students' experience and feedback were evaluated after 15 weeks. RESULTS: We found that while students preferred face-to-face, physical teaching, they were able to adapt to the new norm of e-learning. More than 60% of the students agreed that pre-recorded lectures and viewing videos of practical sessions, plus answering short questions, were beneficial. Certain aspects, such as hands-on practical and clinical experience, could never be replaced. The e-learning and study-from-home environment accorded a lot of flexibility. However, students also found it challenging to focus because of distractions, lack of engagement and mental stress. Technical problems, such as poor Internet connectivity and limited data plans, also compounded the problem. CONCLUSION: We expect e-learning to prevail in future. Hybrid learning strategies, which includes face-to-face classes and e-learning, will become common, at least in the medical physics programme of the University of Malaya even after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Internet , Learning , Malaysia , Program Development , Program Evaluation/methods , Students, Medical , Teaching , Universities
7.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 20(supl.1): e0131, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-699454

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To describe and compare how three dental schools from different countries (Australia, Brazil, and the USA) have managed experiences in dental education during the COVID-19 crisis. Material and Methods: It is a descriptive study reporting the experience that three distinct dental schools faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. They represent countries that adopted different measures to tackle the pandemic and were undergoing different stages of the disease. Results: After the WHO declared the COVID-19 pandemic, the Federal University of Paraíba suspended all on-site teaching, research, and service activities. For the return to teaching activities, the use of information and communications technology resources for distance learning was recommended. At the School of Dental Medicine (University of Pittsburgh), all research activities were suspended or, otherwise, could not be interrupted because of the employment of unique materials or supplies. When the pandemic started, Australia was one of the first countries to introduce strong regulations related to social distancing, travel restrictions, testing and tracking of infected patients. As such, the universities started to be closed from mid-March, cancelling all clinical and pre-clinical activities, maintaining online theoretical activities, such as seminars, lectures, and journal clubs. Conclusion: Numerous and critical difficulties have arisen as a result of the pandemic for individuals, communities and institutions that will have long-lasting effects. Our students face disruption to their education and career; our professional colleagues will be challenged rebuilding their practices, while staff at all Dental Schools are experiencing various hardships.


Subject(s)
Social Isolation/psychology , Coronavirus/immunology , Educational Technology/methods , SARS Virus , Education, Dental , Schools, Dental , Australia/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , World Health Organization , Brazil/epidemiology , Epidemiology, Descriptive , Education, Distance/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control
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