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1.
Open Heart ; 9(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrhythmias have been observed among patients hospitalised with acute COVID-19 infection, and palpitations remain a common symptom among the much larger outpatient population of COVID-19 survivors in the convalescent stage of the disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine arrhythmia prevalence among outpatients after a COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: Adults with a positive COVID-19 test and without a history of arrhythmia were prospectively evaluated with 14-day ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Participants were instructed to trigger the monitor for palpitations. RESULTS: A total of 51 individuals (mean age 42±11 years, 65% women) underwent monitoring at a median 75 (IQR 34-126) days after a positive COVID-19 test. Median monitoring duration was 13.2 (IQR 10.5-13.8) days. No participant demonstrated atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, sustained supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), sustained ventricular tachycardia or infranodal atrioventricular block. Nearly all participants (96%) had an ectopic burden of <1%; one participant had a 2.8% supraventricular ectopic burden and one had a 15.4% ventricular ectopic burden. While 47 (92%) participants triggered their monitor for palpitation symptoms, 78% of these triggers were for either sinus rhythm or sinus tachycardia. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find evidence of malignant or sustained arrhythmias in outpatients after a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. While palpitations were common, symptoms frequently corresponded to sinus rhythm/sinus tachycardia or non-malignant arrhythmias such as isolated ectopy or non-sustained SVT. While these findings cannot exclude the possibility of serious arrhythmias in select individuals, they do not support a strong or widespread proarrhythmic effect of COVID-19 infection after resolution of acute illness.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , Male , Prospective Studies
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2121867, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375583

ABSTRACT

Importance: Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) occurring after cardiac surgery is associated with adverse outcomes. Whether POAF persists beyond discharge is not well defined. Objective: To determine whether continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring enhances detection of POAF among cardiac surgical patients during the first 30 days after hospital discharge compared with usual care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study is an investigator-initiated, open-label, multicenter, randomized clinical trial conducted at 10 Canadian centers. Enrollment spanned from March 2017 to March 2020, with follow-up through September 11, 2020. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, enrollment stopped on July 17, 2020, at which point 85% of the proposed sample size was enrolled. Cardiac surgical patients with CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years, female sex) score greater than or equal to 4 or greater than or equal to 2 with risk factors for POAF, no history of preoperative AF, and POAF lasting less than 24 hours during hospitalization were enrolled. Interventions: The intervention group underwent continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring with wearable, patch-based monitors for 30 days after randomization. Monitoring was not mandated in the usual care group within 30 days after randomization. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was cumulative AF and/or atrial flutter lasting 6 minutes or longer detected by continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring or by a 12-lead electrocardiogram within 30 days of randomization. Prespecified secondary outcomes included cumulative AF lasting 6 hours or longer and 24 hours or longer within 30 days of randomization, death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, non-central nervous system thromboembolism, major bleeding, and oral anticoagulation prescription. Results: Of the 336 patients randomized (163 patients in the intervention group and 173 patients in the usual care group; mean [SD] age, 67.4 [8.1] years; 73 women [21.7%]; median [interquartile range] CHA2DS2-VASc score, 4.0 [3.0-4.0] points), 307 (91.4%) completed the trial. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the primary end point occurred in 32 patients (19.6%) in the intervention group vs 3 patients (1.7%) in the usual care group (absolute difference, 17.9%; 95% CI, 11.5%-24.3%; P < .001). AF lasting 6 hours or longer was detected in 14 patients (8.6%) in the intervention group vs 0 patients in the usual care group (absolute difference, 8.6%; 95% CI, 4.3%-12.9%; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In post-cardiac surgical patients at high risk of stroke, no preoperative AF history, and AF lasting less than 24 hours during hospitalization, continuous monitoring revealed a significant increase in the rate of POAF after discharge that would otherwise not be detected by usual care. Studies are needed to examine whether these patients will benefit from oral anticoagulation therapy. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02793895.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Atrial Flutter/diagnosis , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/etiology , Atrial Flutter/etiology , COVID-19 , Canada , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Electrocardiography , Female , Hemorrhage , Hospitalization , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Stroke , Thromboembolism
5.
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol ; 26(6): e12872, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Interval duration measurements (IDMs) were compared between standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) and 6-lead ECGs recorded with AliveCor's KardiaMobile 6L, a hand-held mobile device designed for use by patients at home. METHODS: Electrocardiograms were recorded within, on average, 15 min from 705 patients in Mayo Clinic's Windland Smith Rice Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic. Interpretable 12-lead and 6-lead recordings were available for 685 out of 705 (97%) eligible patients. The most common diagnosis was congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS, 343/685 [50%]), followed by unaffected relatives and patients (146/685 [21%]), and patients with other genetic heart diseases, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (36 [5.2%]), arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (23 [3.4%]), and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (14 [2.0%]). IDMs were performed by a central ECG laboratory using lead II with a semi-automated technique. RESULTS: Despite differences in patient position (supine for 12-lead ECGs and sitting for 6-lead ECGs), mean IDMs were comparable, with mean values for the 12-lead and 6-lead ECGs for QTcF, heart rate, PR, and QRS differing by 2.6 ms, -5.5 beats per minute, 1.0 and 1.2 ms, respectively. Despite a modest difference in heart rate, intervals were close enough to allow a detection of clinically meaningful abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: The 6-lead hand-held device is potentially useful for a clinical follow-up of remote patients, and for a safety follow-up of patients participating in clinical trials who cannot visit the investigational site. This technology may extend the use of 12-lead ECG recordings during the current COVID-19 pandemic as remote patient monitoring becomes more common in virtual or hybrid-design clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Electrocardiography/methods , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Adult , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Posture , Prospective Studies , Time
6.
Sci Adv ; 7(20)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226704

ABSTRACT

Soft, skin-integrated electronic sensors can provide continuous measurements of diverse physiological parameters, with broad relevance to the future of human health care. Motion artifacts can, however, corrupt the recorded signals, particularly those associated with mechanical signatures of cardiopulmonary processes. Design strategies introduced here address this limitation through differential operation of a matched, time-synchronized pair of high-bandwidth accelerometers located on parts of the anatomy that exhibit strong spatial gradients in motion characteristics. When mounted at a location that spans the suprasternal notch and the sternal manubrium, these dual-sensing devices allow measurements of heart rate and sounds, respiratory activities, body temperature, body orientation, and activity level, along with swallowing, coughing, talking, and related processes, without sensitivity to ambient conditions during routine daily activities, vigorous exercises, intense manual labor, and even swimming. Deployments on patients with COVID-19 allow clinical-grade ambulatory monitoring of the key symptoms of the disease even during rehabilitation protocols.


Subject(s)
Accelerometry/instrumentation , Accelerometry/methods , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Wearable Electronic Devices , Body Temperature , COVID-19 , Exercise/physiology , Heart Rate , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Electrocardiol ; 64: 72-75, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933250

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a protocol was designed for mail-out devices and educational materials created to teach patients how to install a device for 2 weeks of continuous ambulatory ECG monitoring. We compared data collection from two sequential patient populations; one who received standard device application in the same clinic in the months before the pandemic response, and another, who received their device by mail for self-installation. Patients received a single phone call when the device was mailed and were able to contact the manufacturer as needed for support. A total of 47 devices were assessed from each group. Each group was similar in age (70 vs 65 years), and clinical indication for monitoring. Noise signal magnitude (22.34 vs 26.28%), symptom based manual activation (10 vs 8 events) and APB/recorded hour burden measurements (37.05 vs 23.36%) were similar in both groups (all comparisons were statistically non-significant). Both groups had a similar mean of hours recorded (240.37 vs. 245.05 h). Zero patient kits were lost, and all reports were delivered. Overall, it was found that a mail-delivered home-based recording platform can be reliably used to acquire clinical data with similar data quality and patient compliance as a conventional in-clinic model for long term ambulatory ECG monitoring.


Subject(s)
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Aged , COVID-19 , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Electrocardiography, Ambulatory/methods , Female , Home Care Services , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Self-Management
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