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1.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 14(5)2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741669

ABSTRACT

The use of robot-assisted technology is expanding in interventional laboratories with an increasing number of reports of effective treatment delivery in neurointerventional procedures. Here we report the feasibility of complete robot-assisted neurointervention including the guide catheter and microcatheter manipulations with subsequent embolization of the arterial source of hemorrhage in a patient hospitalized with severe COVID-19 complicated by acute epistaxis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Embolization, Therapeutic , Robotic Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/complications , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Epistaxis/etiology , Epistaxis/therapy , Humans
2.
Tuberk Toraks ; 69(4): 561-566, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580007

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by respiratory infection which can show very different clinical pictures, somewhat changing medical paradigm. Hemoptysis defined as idiopathic can be seen as much as 15%. Currently, increasing hemoptysis cases are being reported in medical coronavirus literature. We here present a hemoptysis case that would be defined as idiopathic before the COVID-19 era. After the first clinical picture, the case turned into a life-threatening hemoptysis. We studied the case comprehensively as clinical, pathogenetical, therapeutic and clinical practical aspects. Thus, we hypothesized that especially in the pandemic era, all hemoptysis cases must be evaluated as a possible life threatening infectious disease with unpredictable prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Embolization, Therapeutic , Bronchial Arteries , Hemoptysis/diagnosis , Hemoptysis/etiology , Hemoptysis/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259733, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511831

ABSTRACT

Injured patients requiring definitive intervention, such as surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE), are an extremely time-sensitive population. The effect of an emergency physician (EP) patient care delivery system in this important trauma subset remains unclear. We aimed to clarify whether the preoperative time course and mortality among injured patients differ between ambulances staffed by EPs and those staffed by emergency life-saving technicians (ELST). This was a retrospective cohort study at a community emergency department (ED) in Japan. We included all injured patients requiring emergency surgery or TAE who were transported directly from the ED to the operating room from January 2002 to December 2019. The primary exposure was dispatch of an EP-staffed ambulance to the prehospital scene. The primary outcome measures were preoperative time course including prehospital length of stay (LOS), ED LOS, and total time to definitive intervention. The other outcome of interest was in-hospital mortality. One-to-one propensity score matching was performed to compare these outcomes between the groups. Of the 1,020 eligible patients, 353 (34.6%) were transported to the ED by an EP-staffed ambulance. In the propensity score-matched analysis with 295 pairs, the EP group showed a significant increase in median prehospital LOS (71.0 min vs. 41.0 min, P < 0.001) and total time to definitive intervention (189.0 min vs. 177.0 min, P = 0.002) in comparison with the ELST group. Conversely, ED LOS was significantly shorter in the EP group than in the ELST group (120.0 min vs. 131.0 min, P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in mortality between the two groups (8.8% vs.9.8%, P = 0.671). At a community hospital in Japan, EP-staffed ambulances were found to be associated with prolonged prehospital time, delay in definitive treatment, and did not improve survival among injured patients needing definitive hemostatic procedures compared with ELST-staffed ambulances.


Subject(s)
Ambulances , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Japan , Length of Stay , Operating Rooms , Retrospective Studies
5.
Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) ; 20(2): 174-182, 2021 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are acquired pathological shunting lesions between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus leading to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). CCFs are commonly treated via endovascular embolization, which theoretically restores physiological pressure differentials. OBJECTIVE: To present our institutional data with CCF treated with embolization and discuss endovascular routes, recurrence rates, and dynamic IOP changes. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 42 CCF patients who underwent Onyx (Covidien, Irvine, California) embolization and pre- and postoperative IOP measurement at a single institution. RESULTS: CCFs were 19.0% direct (type A) and 81.0% indirect (types B, C, or D). Onyx-18 liquid embolisate was used during all embolizations. Overall rate of total occlusion was 83.3% and was statistically similar between direct and indirect fistulas. Preoperative IOP was elevated in 37.5%, 100.0%, 75.0%, and 50% in type A, B, C, and D fistulas, respectively. Average ΔIOP was -7.3 ± 8.5 mmHg (range: -33 to +8). Follow-up time was 4.64 ± 7.62 mo. Full angiographic occlusion was a predictor of symptom resolution at 1 mo (P = .026) and 6 mo (P = .021). Partial occlusion was associated with persistent symptoms postoperatively at 1 mo (P = .038) and 6 mo follow-up (P = .012). Beyond 6 mo, negative ΔIOP was associated with continued symptom improvement. Recurrence occurred in 9.5% of patients, all of which were indirect CCFs. CONCLUSION: Onyx embolization of CCF is an effective treatment for CCF and often results in the reversal of IOP elevation. Full occlusion predicts favorable clinical outcomes up to 6 mo. Postoperative IOP reduction may indicate favorable long-term clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula , Cavernous Sinus , Embolization, Therapeutic , Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/diagnostic imaging , Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/therapy , Humans , Intraocular Pressure , Retrospective Studies
6.
World Neurosurg ; 156: 11, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454571

ABSTRACT

Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are acquired pathologic shunts between the carotid circulation and the cavernous sinus that result in venous congestion.1 They often present with ocular symptoms, such as chemosis, proptosis, and blurry vision. Cranial nerve deficits and increased intraocular pressure are often seen on the neuro-ophthalmologic examination.2 If left untreated, they can lead to cortical venous reflux and intracranial hemorrhage. A cerebral angiogram is the gold standard to diagnose these lesions. The hallmark of dural CCF is opacification of venous structures in the arterial phase of the angiogram. Dependent on carotid branches contributing to the fistula, 4 types are classically defined by Barrow et al.3 When the fistula is indirect (types B-D), the goal of treatment is obliteration via the transvenous route.4 We present the case of a patient who had chemosis and proptosis of the left eye with imaging findings concerning for dural CCF (Video 1). An informed consent was obtained and the patient underwent a cerebral angiogram and treatment of the CCF. In the operative video, we showcase the treatment of a type D CCF using transvenous embolization with Onyx (Covidien, Irvine, CA) and achieve angiographic cure of the fistula. We were able to use Onyx for embolization since the superselective injection did not show cortical venous drainage. This is important as obliteration of cortical veins with liquid embolisate could cause venous infarcts. To our knowledge, this is the first video article that illustrates the endovascular embolization of a CCF and highlights the angiographic findings pre- and post-embolization.


Subject(s)
Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/diagnostic imaging , Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/therapy , Dimethyl Sulfoxide/administration & dosage , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Polyvinyls/administration & dosage , Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/complications , Exophthalmos/diagnostic imaging , Exophthalmos/etiology , Exophthalmos/therapy , Humans , Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Middle Aged
7.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 4: CD000479, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Varicoceles are associated with male subfertility; however, the mechanisms by which varicoceles affect fertility have yet to be satisfactorily explained. Several treatment options exist, including surgical or radiological treatment, however the safest and most efficient treatment remains unclear.  OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical and radiological treatment of varicoceles on live birth rate, adverse events, pregnancy rate, varicocele recurrence, and quality of life amongst couples where the adult male has a varicocele, and the female partner of childbearing age has no fertility problems. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases on 4 April 2020: the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. We also searched the trial registries and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) if they were relevant to the clinical question posed and compared different forms of surgical ligation, different forms of radiological treatments, surgical treatment compared to radiological treatment, or one of these aforementioned treatment forms compared to non-surgical methods, delayed treatment, or no treatment. We extracted data if the studies reported on live birth, adverse events, pregnancy, varicocele recurrence, and quality of life. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Screening of abstracts and full-text publications, alongside data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment, were done dually using the Covidence software. When we had sufficient data, we calculated random-effects (Mantel-Haenszel) meta-analyses; otherwise, we reported results narratively. We used the I2 statistic to analyse statistical heterogeneity. We planned to use funnel plots to assess publication bias in meta-analyses with at least 10 included studies. We dually rated the risk of bias of studies using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool, and the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 1897 citations after de-duplicating the search results. We excluded 1773 during title and abstract screening. From the 113 new full texts assessed in addition to the 10 studies (11 references) included in the previous version of this review, we included 38 new studies, resulting in a total of 48 studies (59 references) in the review providing data for 5384 participants. Two studies (three references) are ongoing studies and two studies are awaiting classification. Treatment versus non-surgical, non-radiological, delayed, or no treatment Two studies comparing surgical or radiological treatment versus no treatment reported on live birth with differing directions of effect. As a result, we are uncertain whether surgical or radiological treatment improves live birth rates when compared to no treatment (risk ratio (RR) 2.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 26.93; 2 RCTs, N = 204; I2 = 74%, very low-certainty evidence). Treatment may improve pregnancy rates compared to delayed or no treatment (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.26; 13 RCTs, N = 1193; I2 = 65%, low-certainty evidence). This suggests that couples with no or delayed treatment have a 21% chance of pregnancy, whilst the pregnancy rate after surgical or radiological treatment is between 22% and 48%. We identified no evidence on adverse events, varicocele recurrence, or quality of life for this comparison. Surgical versus radiological treatment We are uncertain about the effect of surgical versus radiological treatment on live birth and on the following adverse events: hydrocele formation, pain, epididymitis, haematoma, and suture granuloma. We are uncertain about the effect of surgical versus radiological treatment on pregnancy rate (RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.70; 5 RCTs, N = 456, low-certainty evidence) and varicocele recurrence (RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.08; 3 RCTs, N = 380, low-certainty evidence). We identified no evidence on quality of life for this comparison. Surgery versus other surgical treatment We identified 19 studies comparing microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment to any other surgical treatment. Microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment probably improves pregnancy rates slightly compared to other surgical treatments (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.36; 12 RCTs, N = 1473, moderate-certainty evidence). This suggests that couples with microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment have a 10% to 14% chance of pregnancy after treatment, whilst the pregnancy rate in couples after other surgical treatments is 10%. This procedure also probably reduces the risk of varicocele recurrence (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29, 0.79; 14 RCTs, N = 1565, moderate-certainty evidence). This suggests that 0.4% to 1.1% of men undergoing microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment experience recurrent varicocele, whilst 1.4% of men undergoing other surgical treatments do. Results for the following adverse events were inconclusive: hydrocele formation, haematoma, abdominal distension, testicular atrophy, wound infection, scrotal pain, and oedema. We identified no evidence on live birth or quality of life for this comparison. Nine studies compared open inguinal surgical treatment to retroperitoneal surgical treatment. Due to small sample sizes and methodological limitations, we identified neither treatment type as superior or inferior to the other regarding adverse events, pregnancy rates, or varicocele recurrence. We identified no evidence on live birth or quality of life for this comparison. Radiological versus other radiological treatment One study compared two types of radiological treatment (sclerotherapy versus embolisation) and reported 13% varicocele recurrence in both groups. Due to the broad confidence interval, no valid conclusion could be drawn (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.16 to 6.20; 1 RCT, N = 30, very low-certainty evidence). We identified no evidence on live birth, adverse events, pregnancy, or quality of life for this comparison. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based on the limited evidence, it remains uncertain whether any treatment (surgical or radiological) compared to no treatment in subfertile men may be of benefit on live birth rates; however, treatment may improve the chances for pregnancy. The evidence was also insufficient to determine whether surgical treatment was superior to radiological treatment. However, microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment probably improves pregnancy rates and reduces the risk of varicocele recurrence compared to other surgical treatments. High-quality, head-to-head comparative RCTs focusing on live birth rate and also assessing adverse events and quality of life are warranted.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic , Infertility, Male/therapy , Sclerotherapy/methods , Varicocele/therapy , Bias , Confidence Intervals , Embolization, Therapeutic/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Infertility, Male/etiology , Infertility, Male/surgery , Live Birth , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Recurrence , Sclerotherapy/adverse effects , Sperm Count , Testicular Hydrocele/etiology , Varicocele/complications , Varicocele/surgery
8.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0233981, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456053

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine aneurysm hemodynamics with intra-saccular pressure measurement, and compare the effects of coiling, stenting and stent-assisted coiling in proximal segments of intracranial circulation. A cohort of 45 patients underwent elective endovascular coil embolization (with or without stent) for intracranial aneurysm at our department. Arterial pressure transducer was used for all measurements. It was attached to proximal end of the microcatheter. Measurements were taken in the parent artery before and after embolization, at the aneurysm dome before embolization, after stent implantation, and after embolization. Stent-assisted coiling was performed with 4 different stents: LVIS and LVIS Jr (Microvention, Tustin, CA, USA), Leo (Balt, Montmorency, France), Barrel VRD (Medtronic/ Covidien, Irvine, CA, USA). Presence of the stent showed significant reverse correlation with intra-aneurysmal pressure-both systolic and diastolic-after its implantation (r = -0.70 and r = -0.75, respectively), which was further supported by correlations with stent cell size-r = 0.72 and r = 0.71, respectively (P<0.05). Stent implantation resulted in significant decrease in diastolic intra-aneurysmal pressure (p = 0.046). Systolic or mean intra-aneurysmal pressure did not differ significantly. Embolization did not significantly change the intra-aneurysmal pressure in matched pairs, regardless of the use of stent (p>0.05). In conclusion, low-profile braided stents show a potential to divert blood flow, there was significant decrease in diastolic pressure after stent placement. Flow-diverting properties were related to stent porosity. Coiling does not significantly change the intra-aneurysmal pressure, regardless of packing density.


Subject(s)
Blood Pressure , Intracranial Aneurysm/physiopathology , Stents , Aged , Arterial Pressure , Blood Circulation , Blood Vessel Prosthesis , Brain/blood supply , Brain/physiopathology , Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Hemodynamics , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Male , Middle Aged
9.
Interv Neuroradiol ; 26(5): 557-565, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Low-profile Visualized Intraluminal Support device (LVIS) has been successfully used to treat cerebral aneurysm, and the push-pull technique has been used clinically to compact the stent across aneurysm orifice. Our aim was to exhibit the hemodynamic effect of the compacted LVIS stent. METHODS: Two patient-specific aneurysm models were constructed from three-dimensional angiographic images. The uniform LVIS stent, compacted LVIS and Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) with or without coil embolization were virtually deployed into aneurysm models to perform hemodynamic analysis. Intra-aneurysmal flow parameters were calculated to assess hemodynamic differences among different models. RESULTS: The compacted LVIS had the highest metal coverage across the aneurysm orifice (case 1, 46.37%; case 2, 67.01%). However, the PED achieved the highest pore density (case 1, 19.56 pores/mm2; case 2, 18.07 pores/mm2). The compacted LVIS produced a much higher intra-aneurysmal flow reduction than the uniform LVIS. The PED showed a higher intra-aneurysmal flow reduction than the compacted LVIS in case 1, but the results were comparable in case 2. After stent placement, the intra-aneurysmal flow was further reduced as subsequent coil embolization. The compacted LVIS stent with coils produced a similar reduction in intra-aneurysmal flow to that of the PED. CONCLUSIONS: The combined characteristics of stent metal coverage and pore density should be considered when assessing the flow diversion effects of stents. More intra-aneurysmal flow reductions could be introduced by compacted LVIS stent than the uniform one. Compared with PED, compacted LVIS stent may exhibit a flow-diverting effect comparable to that of the PED.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Cerebral Angiography , Computer Simulation , Hemodynamics , Humans , Hydrodynamics , Imaging, Three-Dimensional , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Prosthesis Design , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging
10.
Neurosurgery ; 87(3): 516-522, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pipeline embolization device (PED; Medtronic) and stent-assisted coiling (SAC) are established modalities for treatment of intracranial aneurysms. OBJECTIVE: To comparatively assess the efficacy of these techniques. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with aneurysms treated at our institution with either PED from 2013 to 2017 or SAC from 2009 to 2015. All large (>10 mm), ruptured, fusiform, anterior communicating artery, posterior circulation aneurysms, and patients with no available follow-up imaging were eliminated before running the propensity score matching (PSM). Patients were matched using nearest neighbor controlling for: age, gender, smoking, exact location, maximal diameter, and presence of multiple aneurysms. Total hospital costs for equipment and implants were calculated from procedure product and hospital billing records, and compared between the propensity-matched pairs. RESULTS: Out of 165 patients harboring 202 aneurysms; 170 (84.2%) were treated with the PED, and 32 (15.8%) were treated using SAC. PSM resulted in 23 matched pairs; with significantly longer follow up in the SAC group (mean 29.8 vs 14.1 mo; P = .0002). Complete occlusion rates were not different (82.6 vs 87%; P = .68), with no difference between the groups for modified Rankin Scale on last clinical follow-up, procedural complications or retreatment rates. Average total costs calculated from the hospital records, including equipment and implants, were not different between propensity-score matched pairs (P = .48). CONCLUSION: PED placement and SAC offer equally efficacious occlusion rates, functional outcomes, procedural complication rates, and cost profiles for small unruptured anterior circulation saccular aneurysms which do not involve the anterior communicating artery.


Subject(s)
Blood Vessel Prosthesis , Embolization, Therapeutic/instrumentation , Endovascular Procedures/instrumentation , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Stents , Adult , Aged , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
11.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 66: 104-109, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454026

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Type 2 endoleaks (T2Es) are the main cause of reintervention after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR). The objective of this study is to quantify success rates of T2E treatment. METHODS: This study involves a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database containing data on all consecutive patients treated for a T2E between 2003 and 2017 in a single center. Technical success was defined as absence of endoleak in the final angiographic control after treatment. Clinical success was defined as absence of sac growth over 5 mm in the contrast-enhanced computed tomography performed a year thereafter. Statistics included Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. RESULTS: A total of 528 elective EVARs were performed in the period. Thirty-six of these (6.8%) developed a T2E requiring reintervention, a median of 37.9 months after EVAR. Twenty-five percent of the treatments were performed more than 5 years after intervention. Twenty-eight of the 36 treatments were performed via transarterial embolization. For this technique, technical success was 71.4% and clinical success was 62.5%. A subsequent reintervention was required in 35.7% of patients. In this cohort, the rate of aneurysm rupture was 10.7% (n = 3/28), open surgical conversion was needed in 2 of 28 cases (7.1%), and rate of aneurysm-related death was 14.3% (n = 4/28) over follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A high percentage of patients are at risk of adverse outcomes after T2E treatment. Strict imaging follow-up is still needed in this population.


Subject(s)
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/surgery , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Embolization, Therapeutic , Endoleak/therapy , Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/mortality , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation/mortality , Databases, Factual , Embolization, Therapeutic/adverse effects , Embolization, Therapeutic/mortality , Endoleak/diagnostic imaging , Endoleak/etiology , Endoleak/mortality , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Humans , Retreatment , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(5)2021 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238492

ABSTRACT

We present to you a case of life-threatening haemoptysis secondary to non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis complicated by bronchial artery pseudoaneurysms. We discuss this patient's emergency medical management using intravenous tranexamic acid, which resulted in successful resuscitation and eventual survival, and evaluate the need for urgent anaesthetic and interventional radiology input in such a case.


Subject(s)
Bronchiectasis , Embolization, Therapeutic , Bronchial Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Hemoptysis/etiology , Hemoptysis/therapy , Humans , Treatment Outcome
14.
Am J Emerg Med ; 47: 316.e1-316.e3, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141562

ABSTRACT

While primarily a respiratory illness, infection with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is associated with pathologic changes in coagulation, characterized by both thromboembolic and bleeding events. We present the case of a 22-year-old female diagnosed with renal angiomyolipoma (AML) rupture 2 weeks after COVID-19 infection, ultimately requiring admission for hemorrhage control via endovascular embolization. Emergency medicine physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for renal AML rupture and other spontaneous bleeding events in patients with recent COVID-19 infection due to a possible correlation between the two.


Subject(s)
Angiomyolipoma/complications , COVID-19/complications , Hemorrhage/etiology , Kidney Neoplasms/complications , Angiomyolipoma/diagnostic imaging , Angiomyolipoma/therapy , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Female , Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Hemorrhage/therapy , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Neoplasms/therapy , Rupture , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
Ear Nose Throat J ; 100(2_suppl): 148S-151S, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013115

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may have endothelial inflammation, pseudoaneurysm, and an increasing risk of bleeding, especially during surgical procedures. In this article, we reported 2 cases of COVID-19 patients with neck vascular lesions. The first patient had pseudoaneurysm of the cricothyroid artery, which was treated by percutaneous glue injection through ultrasonography guidance. The second patient presented lateral neck hematoma in front of the left superior thyroid artery, which was managed by coil endovascular embolization. In the context of pandemic, the management of vascular lesions may be performed through interventional radiological procedures that may reduce the risk of virus aerosolization and health care provider contamination.


Subject(s)
Adhesives/therapeutic use , Aneurysm, False/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Hematoma/therapy , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Radiology, Interventional , Tracheotomy , Aged , Aneurysm, False/complications , Aneurysm, False/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Computed Tomography Angiography , Cyanoacrylates/therapeutic use , Endovascular Procedures , Hematoma/complications , Hematoma/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neck , Postoperative Complications/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroid Gland/blood supply , Ultrasonography
18.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(2): e1, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883391

ABSTRACT

This is a report of the first three cases of endovascular aneurysm treatment that were proctored by a remote interventionalist using a novel high-resolution low-latency streaming technology. The proctor was located in a neurovascular centre and supported the treating interventional teams in two distant cities (up to 800 km/500 miles apart). All aneurysms were treated using the Woven EndoBridge (WEB) embolisation system, either electively or following subarachnoid haemorrhage. On-site proctoring was not possible due to travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. WEB placement was feasible in all cases. Good rapport between proctors and treating physicians was reported, enabled by the high-resolution image transmission and uninterrupted feedback/discussion via audiostream. No clinical complications were encountered. Short-term follow-up revealed adequate occlusion of all treated aneurysms. The employed streaming technology provided effective remote proctoring during complex aneurysm cases, including the management of technical complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation , Communication , Embolization, Therapeutic , Feedback , Humans , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing
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