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3.
Lancet Glob Health ; 10(12): e1855-e1859, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150878

ABSTRACT

Data sharing in research is fraught with controversy. Academic success is premised on competitive advantage, with research teams protecting their research findings until publication. Research funders, by contrast, often require data sharing. Beyond traditional research and funding requirements, surveillance data have become contentious. Public health emergencies involving pathogens require intense genomic surveillance efforts and call for the rapid sharing of data on the basis of public interest. Under these circumstances, timely sharing of data becomes a matter of scientific integrity. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the transformative potential of genomic pathogen data sharing became obvious and advanced the debate on data sharing. However, when the genomic sequencing data of the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant was shared and announced by scientists in southern Africa, various challenges arose, including travel bans. The scientific, economic, and moral impact was catastrophic. Yet, travel restrictions failed to mitigate the spread of the variant already present in countries outside Africa. Public perceptions of the negative effect of data sharing are detrimental to the willingness of research participants to consent to sharing data in postpandemic research and future pandemics. Global health governance organisations have an important role in developing guidance on responsible sharing of genomic pathogen data in public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Information Dissemination , Genomics , Africa, Southern
4.
AORN J ; 114(1): P7-P9, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157687

Subject(s)
Emergencies , Humans
5.
J Med Life ; 15(10): 1267-1271, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146202

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on emergencies and pain among orthodontic patients attending a teaching hospital. The study was conducted among orthodontic patients receiving active orthodontic treatment or in a retention period at the College of Dentistry, University of Baghdad, Iraq. Their participation was voluntary, and they filled out an Arabic-translated questionnaire. The survey included general information, orthodontic problems, and a numerical rating scale for pain assessment. We used descriptive and inferential statistics (frequencies and intersecting frequencies), chi-square test and linear regression. Out of 75 orthodontic patients, only 54 (15 males and 39 females) were included in the study. The most encountered orthodontic problem was broken or movable bracket (55.6%), followed by long pocking wire 35.2%. In addition, 55.6% of the participants preferred to wait for the next appointment to see their orthodontist, and only 5.6% tried to treat the problem personally. There was no significant relationship between pain level, gender and age, whereas a strong significant association was found between pain intensity and orthodontic problems or emergencies. COVID-19 had a negative impact on orthodontic follow-up visits. The intensity of pain was strongly correlated with orthodontic problems or emergencies. Therefore, more attention should be given to patients, focusing on teaching them how to manage orthodontic emergencies during situations such as an outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Hospitals, Teaching , Pain/epidemiology , Pain/etiology , Pain Measurement
6.
Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 38(4): 515-519, 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145254

ABSTRACT

In recent years, human beings are constantly facing the threat of emerging infectious diseases. Forensic technology plays a unique role in responding to the emergencies and new epidemics. In epidemic prevention and control, forensic partitioners can provide important clues for the identification of vector animal species and the traceability of pathogen regions based on non-human DNA testing technology. In epidemic-related judicial practice, forensic partitioners bear more and more evidence responsibilities in dealing with biosafety laws-related issues, such as improper handling of epidemics and vaccine safety issues, which require forensic evidence. In terms of pathogen tracing, forensic physical evidence examinations identify species and individuals through biological materials extracted from the scene of death and autopsy of infectious diseases, are expected to provide informative clues for epidemiological investigations and point out the direction for pathogen tracing. In addition, forensic pathological examination can provide an important pathophysiological basis for determining the cause of death and the mechanism of death through autopsy, also offer necessary scientific evidence for clarifying the epidemiological characteristics of the epidemic and predicting the development trend of the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Emergencies , Forensic Medicine , Animals , Humans , Autopsy , Physical Examination , DNA
7.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2197, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Points of Entry (POEs) are at the frontline for prevention, detection and response to international spread of diseases. The objective of this assessment was to ascertain the current level of existing International Health Regulations (IHR) core capacities of designated airports, ports and ground crossings in Cameroon and identify critical gaps for capacity building for prevention, early warning and response to public health threats including COVID-19. METHODS: Data were collected from April to May 2020 in 5 designated POEs: Yaounde Nsimalen International Airport (YIA), Douala international Airport (DIA), Douala Autonomous Port (DAP), Garoua-Boulai ground crossing, Kye-Ossi ground crossing which were all selected for their high volume of passenger and goods traffic. The World Health Organization (WHO) assessment tool for core capacity requirements at designated airports, ports and ground crossings was used to collect data on three technical capacities: (i) communication and coordination, (ii) Capacities at all times and (iii) capacities to respond to Public Health Emergencies of International Concern (PHEIC). RESULTS: All the investigated POEs scored below 50% of capacities in place. YIA recorded the highest percentage for all groups of capacities, coordination and communication and for core capacity at all times with a percentage of 42%, 58% and 32% respectively. For core capacity to respond to PHEIC, all the POEs recorded below 50%. The DAP and all ground crossings lacked trained personnel for inspection of conveyances. Only DIA had a public health emergency plan. There is no isolation/quarantine and transport capacity at the POEs. CONCLUSION: All POEs assessed did not meet IHR standards and need significant improvement to fulfill the IHR requirements. Unstructured communication channels between stakeholders make the implementation of IHR challenging. A coordination mechanism, with clear functions and structure, is necessary for well-coordinated response efforts to health emergencies at POEs. This assessment will serve as a baseline to inform planning and IHR implementation at designated POEs in Cameroon.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cameroon/epidemiology , Emergencies , Pandemics/prevention & control
8.
Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin (Engl Ed) ; 40(9): 503-506, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2130676

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The objective is to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the pediatric emergencies and hospital admissions. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of patients treated in a tertiary hospital, from March 14 to April 26, 2020, compared to the same period of the previous 3 years. RESULTS: A notable overall reduction in emergency room visits and admissions is observed in all pediatric areas, maintaining care in neonatology and scheduled admissions in oncology. DISCUSSION: The reduction in global activity in pediatric emergencies is not only explained by the decrease in contagious diseases. The decrease in inadequate demand and inappropriate income may have contributed. The availability of pediatric beds would make the reduction of programmed surgical activity unnecessary and would allow the redistribution of resources to areas with greater healthcare pressure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Child , Pandemics , Tertiary Care Centers , SARS-CoV-2 , Emergencies , Retrospective Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 42(Suppl 1): 8, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110978

ABSTRACT

The vulnerable populations in the protracted humanitarian crisis in South Sudan are faced with constrained access to health services and frequent disease outbreaks. Here, we describe the experiences of emergency mobile medical teams (eMMT) assembled by the World Health Organization (WHO) South Sudan to respond to public health emergencies. Interventions: the eMMTs, multidisciplinary teams based at national, state and county levels, are rapidly deployed to conduct rapid assessments, outbreak investigations, and initiate public health response during acute emergencies. The eMMTs were deployed to locations affected by flooding, conflicts, famine, and disease outbreaks. We reviewed records of deployment reports, outreach and campaign registers, and analyzed the key achievements of the eMMTs for 2017 through 2020. Achievements: the eMMTs investigated disease outbreaks including cholera, measles, Rift Valley fever and coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in 13 counties, conducted mobile outreaches in emergency locations in 38 counties (320,988 consultations conducted), trained 550 healthcare workers including rapid response teams, and supported reactive measles vaccination campaigns in seven counties [148,726, (72-125%) under-5-year-old children vaccinated] and reactive oral cholera vaccination campaigns in four counties (355,790 vaccinated). The eMMT is relevant in humanitarian settings and can reduce excess morbidity and mortality and fill gaps that routine health facilities and health partners could not bridge. However, the scope of the services offered needs to be broadened to include mental and psychosocial care and a strategy for ensuring continuity of vaccination services and management of chronic conditions after the mobile outreach is instituted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cholera , Measles , Child, Preschool , Cholera/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Emergencies , Humans , Immunization Programs , Measles/epidemiology , Measles/prevention & control , South Sudan/epidemiology
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(11): e40701, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media provide an ideal medium for breeding and reinforcing vaccine hesitancy, especially during public health emergencies. Algorithmic recommendation-based technology along with users' selective exposure and group pressure lead to online echo chambers, causing inefficiency in vaccination promotion. Avoiding or breaking echo chambers largely relies on key users' behavior. OBJECTIVE: With the ultimate goal of eliminating the impact of echo chambers related to vaccine hesitancy on social media during public health emergencies, the aim of this study was to develop a framework to quantify the echo chamber effect in users' topic selection and attitude contagion about COVID-19 vaccines or vaccinations; detect online opinion leaders and structural hole spanners based on network attributes; and explore the relationships of their behavior patterns and network locations, as well as the relationships of network locations and impact on topic-based and attitude-based echo chambers. METHODS: We called the Sina Weibo application programming interface to crawl tweets related to the COVID-19 vaccine or vaccination and user information on Weibo, a Chinese social media platform. Adopting social network analysis, we examined the low echo chamber effect based on topics in representational networks of information, according to attitude in communication flow networks of users under different interactive mechanisms (retweeting, commenting). Statistical and visual analyses were used to characterize behavior patterns of key users (opinion leaders, structural hole spanners), and to explore their function in avoiding or breaking topic-based and attitude-based echo chambers. RESULTS: Users showed a low echo chamber effect in vaccine-related topic selection and attitude interaction. For the former, the homophily was more obvious in retweeting than in commenting, whereas the opposite trend was found for the latter. Speakers, replicators, and monologists tended to be opinion leaders, whereas common users, retweeters, and networkers tended to be structural hole spanners. Both leaders and spanners tended to be "bridgers" to disseminate diverse topics and communicate with users holding cross-cutting attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccines. Moreover, users who tended to echo a single topic could bridge multiple attitudes, while users who focused on diverse topics also tended to serve as bridgers for different attitudes. CONCLUSIONS: This study not only revealed a low echo chamber effect in vaccine hesitancy, but further elucidated the underlying reasons from the perspective of users, offering insights for research about the form, degree, and formation of echo chambers, along with depolarization, social capital, stakeholder theory, user portraits, dissemination pattern of topic, and sentiment. Therefore, this work can help to provide strategies for public health and public opinion managers to cooperate toward avoiding or correcting echo chamber chaos and effectively promoting online vaccine campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Emergencies , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Attitude
11.
Am J Public Health ; 112(12): 1757-1764, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119226

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To systematically identify and analyze US state-level legislation concerning people who were undocumented during the COVID-19 pandemic, from January 2020 through August 2021. Methods. Using standard public health law research methods, we searched Westlaw's online database between November 2021 and January 2022 to identify legislation addressing COVID-19 and people who were undocumented. We abstracted relevant information, analyzed the data, and identified primary themes for each bill and resolution. Results. Sixty-six bills and resolutions, from 13 states, met the inclusion criteria. Legislation addressed 5 primary themes: eligibility and access to health-related services (n = 16), health and personal information (n = 10), housing assistance (n = 13), job security and employment benefits (n = 14), and monetary assistance (n = 13). Conclusions. Approximately one quarter of state legislatures introduced bills or resolutions regarding people who were undocumented and COVID-19. State-level laws are an important tool to mitigate the disproportionate impact of public health emergencies on vulnerable groups. Public Health Implications. As states shift attention away from the exigencies of COVID-19, this research provides insight into how law might be used to protect those who are undocumented throughout the full cycle of future public health emergencies. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(12):1757-1764. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307090).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Pandemics , Public Health , Health Services
12.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 115, 2022 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115789

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health scholars have long called for preparedness to help better negotiate ethical issues that emerge during public health emergencies. In this paper we argue that the concept of ethical preparedness has much to offer other areas of health beyond pandemic emergencies, particularly in areas where rapid technological developments have the potential to transform aspects of health research and care, as well as the relationship between them. We do this by viewing the ethical decision-making process as a behaviour, and conceptualising ethical preparedness as providing a health research/care setting that can facilitate the promotion of this behaviour. We draw on an implementation science and behaviour change model, COM-B, to demonstrate that to be ethically prepared requires having the capability (ability), opportunity, and motivation (willingness) to work in an ethically prepared way. METHODS: We use two case examples from our empirical research-one pandemic and one non-pandemic related-to illustrate how our conceptualisation of ethical preparedness can be applied in practice. The first case study was of the UK NHSX COVID-19 contact tracing application case study involved eight in-depth interviews with people involved with the development/governance of this application. The second case involved a complex case regarding familial communication discussed at the UK Genethics Forum. We used deductive qualitative analysis based on the COM-B model categories to analyse the transcripbed data from each case study. RESULTS: Our analysis highlighted that being ethically prepared needs to go beyond merely equipping health professionals with skills and knowledge, or providing research governance actors with ethical principles and/or frameworks. To allow or support these different actors to utilise their skills and knowledge (or principles and frameworks), a focus on the physical and social opportunity is important, as is a better understanding the role of motivation. CONCLUSIONS: To understand ethical preparedness, we need to view the process of ethical decision-making as a behaviour. We have provided insight into the specific factors that are needed to promote this behaviour-using examples from both in the pandemic context as well as in areas of health research and medicine where there have been rapid technological developments. This offers a useful starting point for further conceptual work around the notion of being ethically prepared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergencies , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Morals , Public Health , Pandemics
14.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 124, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108789

ABSTRACT

Public health emergencies (PHEs), such as the COVID-19 crisis, are threats to global health and public order. We recommend that countries bolster their PHE responses by investing in health technology assessment (HTA), defined as a systematic process of gathering pertinent information on and evaluating health technologies from a medical, economic, social and ethical standpoint. We present examples of how HTA organizations in low- and middle-income countries have adapted to supporting PHE-related decisions during COVID-19 and describe the ways HTA can help the response to a PHE. In turn, we advocate for HTA capacity to be further developed globally and for increased institutional acceptance of these methods as a building block for preparedness and response to future PHEs. Finally, the long-term potential of HTA in strengthening health systems and embedding confidence and transparency into scientific policy should be recognized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Technology Assessment, Biomedical , Humans , Public Health , Health Policy , Emergencies
15.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 475, 2022 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the relationship between pandemic events and dental emergency service frequentation. Utilization patterns in the scope of the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed and considered in regard of seasonal parameters. METHODS: All outpatients seeking treatment in a university hospital's dental emergency service were analyzed in the years 2019, 2019 and 2020 according to demographic data and emergencies were subdivided into "absolute" and "relative". The years 2018 and 2019 were used to compare COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 phases. Defined waves of the pandemic were compared with equivalent prior-year periods. RESULTS: Our study includes 11,219 dental emergency patients over a period of three years with a slight surplus of male patients. Comparing the pre-COVID-19 years and 2020 as a year of pandemic, the total count of cases decreased by more than 25%. The share of absolute emergencies in 2020 was higher than in the years before (p < 0.0001). The under-utilization during the waves was more pronounced during the first wave compared to the second waves. CONCLUSIONS: Additionally to the clear decrease by more than 25% in 2020, we found an inverse dependency of 7-day-incidence of COVID-19 and number of visits. This effect was more distinct for relative emergencies, while the number of patients with absolute emergencies remains rather constant. Probably, there is an acclimatization effect regarding the waves. Patients older than 60 years who suffered from relative emergencies showed an under-utilzation during 2020. During a pandemic such as COVID-19, the effect of under-utilization is more pronounced among elderly patients. However, a pandemic acclimatization effect seems to occur. This can be taken into account in the administration of this kind of circumstances in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Male , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Emergency Service, Hospital , Retrospective Studies
16.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 155, 2021 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098402

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly contagious airborne virus inducing pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This is most relevant for medical staff working under harmful conditions in emergencies often dealing with patients and an undefined SARS-CoV-2 status. We aimed to measure the effect of high-class filtering facepieces (FFP) in emergency medical service (EMS) staff by analyzing seroprevalence and history of positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for SARS-CoV-2. METHOD: This observational cohort study included workers in EMS, who were compared with hospital staff (HS) and staff, which was not directly involved in patient care (NPC). All direct patient contacts of EMS workers were protected by FFP2/N95 (filtering face piece protection class 2/non-oil-based particulates filter efficiency 95%) masks, whereas HS was protected by FFP2/N95 exclusively when a patient had a proven or suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. NPC was not protected by higher FFP. The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was analyzed by immunoassay by end of 12/2020 together with the history of a positive PCR. In addition, a self-assessment was performed regarding the quantity of SARS-CoV-2 positive contacts, about flu symptoms and personal belief of previous COVID-19 infections. RESULTS: The period in which contact to SARS-CoV-2 positive patients has been possible was 10 months (March to December 2020)-with 54,681 patient contacts documented for EMS-either emergencies (n = 33,241) or transportation services (n = 21,440). Seven hundred-thirty (n = 730) participants were included into the study (n = EMS: 325, HS: 322 and NPC: 83). The analysis of the survey showed that the exposure to patients with an unknown and consecutive positive SARS-CoV-2 result was significantly higher for EMS when compared to HS (EMS 55% vs. HS 30%, p = 0.01). The incidence of a SARS-CoV-2 infection in our cohort was 1.2% (EMS), 2.2% (HS) and 2.4% (NPC) within the three groups (ns) and lowest in EMS. Furthermore, the belief of previous COVID-19 was significant higher in EMS (19% vs. 10%), CONCLUSION: The consistent use of FFP2/N95 in EMS is able to prevent work-related SARS-CoV-2 infections in emergency situations. The significance of physical airway protection in exposed medical staff is still relevant especially under the aspect of new viral variants and unclear effectiveness of new vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergencies , Cohort Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies
17.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 80, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid access to emergency medical communication centers (EMCCs) is pivotal to address potentially life-threatening conditions. Maintaining public access to EMCCs without delay is crucial in case of disease outbreak despite the significant increased activity and the difficulties to mobilize extra staff resources. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of two-level filtering on EMCC performance during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A before-after monocentric prospective study was conducted at the EMCC at the Nantes University Hospital. Using telephone activity data, we compared EMCC performance during 2 periods. In period one (February 27th to March 11th 2020), call takers managed calls as usual, gathering basic information from the caller and giving first aid instructions to a bystander on scene if needed. During period two (March 12th to March 25th 2020), calls were answered by a first-line call taker to identify potentially serious conditions that required immediate dispatch. When a serious condition was excluded, the call was immediately transferred to a second-line call taker who managed the call as usual so the first-line call taker could be rapidly available for other incoming calls. The primary outcome was the quality of service at 20 s (QS20), corresponding to the rate of calls answered within 20 s. We described activity and outcome measures by hourly range. We compared EMCC performance during periods one and two using an interrupted time series analysis. RESULTS: We analyzed 45,451 incoming calls during the two study periods: 21,435 during period 1 and 24,016 during period 2. Between the two study periods, we observed a significant increase in the number of incoming calls per hour, the number of connected call takers and average call duration. A linear regression model, adjusted for these confounding variables, showed a significant increase in the QS20 slope (from - 0.4 to 1.4%, p = 0.01), highlighting the significant impact of two-level filtering on the quality of service. CONCLUSIONS: We found that rapid access to our EMCC was maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic via two-level filtering. This system helped reduce the time gap between call placement and first-line call-taker evaluation of a potentially life-threatening situation. We suggest implementing this system when an EMCC faces significantly increased activity with limited staff resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergencies , Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Triage/methods , COVID-19 , Controlled Before-After Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
18.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(7): 869-870, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096241
19.
World Neurosurg ; 144: e710-e713, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has set a huge challenge to the delivery of neurosurgical services, including the transfer of patients. We aimed to share our strategy in handling neurosurgical emergencies at a remote center in Borneo island. Our objectives included discussing the logistic and geographic challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Miri General Hospital is a remote center in Sarawak, Malaysia, serving a population with difficult access to neurosurgical services. Two neurosurgeons were stationed here on a rotational basis every fortnight during the pandemic to handle neurosurgical cases. Patients were triaged depending on their urgent needs for surgery or transfer to a neurosurgical center and managed accordingly. All patients were screened for potential risk of contracting COVID-19 prior to the surgery. Based on this, the level of personal protective equipment required for the health care workers involved was determined. RESULTS: During the initial 6 weeks of the Movement Control Order in Malaysia, there were 50 urgent neurosurgical consultations. Twenty patients (40%) required emergency surgery or intervention. There were 9 vascular (45%), 5 trauma (25%), 4 tumor (20%), and 2 hydrocephalus cases (10%). Eighteen patients were operated at Miri General Hospital, among whom 17 (94.4%) survived. Ninety percent of anticipated transfers were avoided. None of the medical staff acquired COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: This framework allowed timely intervention for neurosurgical emergencies (within a safe limit), minimized transfer, and enabled uninterrupted neurosurgical services at a remote center with difficult access to neurosurgical care during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/surgery , Craniocerebral Trauma/surgery , Emergencies , Hemorrhagic Stroke/surgery , Hydrocephalus/surgery , Neurosurgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Air Ambulances , Borneo/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations/surgery , Female , Hospitals, General , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , Skull Base Neoplasms/surgery , Transportation of Patients , Triage
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2093838

ABSTRACT

At the early stage of a major public health emergency outbreak, there exists an imbalance between supply and demand in the distribution of emergency supplies. To improve the efficiency of emergency medical service equipment and relieve the treatment pressure of each medical treatment point, one of the most important factors is the emergency medical equipment logistics distribution. Based on the actual data of medical equipment demand during the epidemic and the characteristics of emergencies, this study proposed an evaluation index system for emergency medical equipment demand point urgency, based on the number of patients, the number of available inpatient beds, and other influencing factors as the index. An urban emergency medical equipment distribution model considering the urgency of demand, the distribution time window, and vehicle load was constructed with the constraints. Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, at the beginning of the outbreak was selected as a validation example, and the Criteria Importance Though Intercriteria Correlation (CRITIC) method and the genetic algorithm were used to simulate and validate the model with and without considering the demand urgency. The results show that under the public health emergencies, the distribution path designed to respond to different levels of urgency demand for medical equipment is the most efficient path and reduces the total distribution cost by 5%.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medical Services , Epidemics , China/epidemiology , Emergencies , Humans , Public Health
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