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1.
BMC Emerg Med ; 23(1): 56, 2023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first weeks of the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the North Denmark emergency medical services authorised paramedics to assess patients suspected of COVID-19 at home, and then decide if conveyance to a hospital was required. The aim of this study was to describe the cohort of patients who were assessed at home and their outcomes in terms of subsequent hospital visits and short-term mortality. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study in the North Denmark Region with consecutive inclusion of patients suspected of COVID-19 who were referred to a paramedic's assessment visit by their general practitioner or an out-of-hours general practitioner. The study was conducted from 16 March to 20 May 2020. The outcomes were the proportion of non-conveyed patients who subsequently visited a hospital within 72 hours of the paramedic's assessment visit and mortality at 3, 7 and 30 days. Mortality was estimated using a Poisson regression model with robust variance estimation. RESULTS: During the study period, 587 patients with a median age of 75 (IQR 59-84) years were referred to a paramedic's assessment visit. Three of four patients (76.5%, 95% CI 72.8;79.9) were non-conveyed, and 13.1% (95% CI 10.2;16.6) of the non-conveyed patients were subsequently referred to a hospital within 72 hours of the paramedic's assessment visit. Within 30 days from the paramedic's assessment visit, mortality was 11.1% [95% CI 6.9;17.9] among patients directly conveyed to a hospital and 5.8% [95% CI 4.0;8.5] among non-conveyed patients. Medical record review revealed that deaths in the non-conveyed group had happened among patients with 'do-not-resuscitate' orders, palliative care plans, severe comorbidities, age ≥ 90 years or nursing home residents. CONCLUSIONS: The majority (87%) of the non-conveyed patients did not visit a hospital for the following three days after a paramedic's assessment visit. The study implies that this newly established prehospital arrangement served as a kind of gatekeeper for the region's hospitals in regard to patients suspected of COVID-19. The study also demonstrates that implementation of non-conveyance protocols should be accompanied by careful and regular evaluation to ensure patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Paramedics , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Patient Safety
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239631

ABSTRACT

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) clinicians provide patient care within a high-stakes, unpredictable, and complex work environment in which conflict is inevitable. Our objective was to explore the extent to which added stressors of the pandemic exacerbated EMS workplace conflict. We administered our survey to a sample of U.S. nationally certified EMS clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2022. Out of 1881 respondents, 46% (n = 857) experienced conflict and 79% (n = 674) provided free-text descriptions of their experience. The responses were analyzed for themes using qualitative content analysis, and they were then sorted into codes using word unit sets. Code counts, frequencies, and rankings were tabulated, enabling quantitative comparisons of the codes. Of the fifteen codes to emerge, stress (a precursor of burnout) and burnout-related fatigue were the key factors contributing to EMS workplace conflict. We mapped our codes to a conceptual model guided by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report on using a systems approach to address clinician burnout and professional well-being to explore implications for addressing conflict within that framework. Factors attributed to conflict mapped to all levels of the NASEM model, lending empirical legitimacy to a broad systems approach to fostering worker well-being. Our findings lead us to propose that active surveillance (enhanced management information and feedback systems) of frontline clinicians' experiences during public health emergencies could increase the effectiveness of regulations and policies across the healthcare system. Ideally, the contributions of the occupational health discipline would become a mainstay of a sustained response to promote ongoing worker well-being. The maintenance of a robust EMS workforce, and by extension the health professionals in its operational sphere, is unquestionably essential to our preparedness for the likelihood that pandemic threats may become more commonplace.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
3.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 35(2)2023 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236963

ABSTRACT

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treatment requires timely diagnosis and treatment for optimal health outcomes. The Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused changes in health-care delivery and utilization; therefore, the present study explored the changes in emergency care quality indicators for patients with AMI before and during different periods of government response to the COVID-19 outbreak in Taiwan. The Taiwan Clinical Performance Indicators database was used to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on acute care quality indicators for patients with AMI during four periods: before the COVID-19 outbreak (Period I-1 January to 31 December 2019) and during three periods in which the central government imposed different levels of epidemic prevention and response alerts (Period II-1 January 2020 to 30 April 2021; Period III-1 May to 31 July 2021; and Period IV-1 August to 31 December 2021). A 15.9% decrease in monthly emergency department admission for patients with AMI occurred during Period III. The hospital 'door-to-electrocardiogram time being <10 min' indicator attainment was significantly lower during Periods III and IV. The attainment of 'dual antiplatelet therapy received within 6 hr of emergency department arrival' indicator improved in Period IV, whereas 'the primary percutaneous coronary intervention being received within 90 min of hospital arrival' indicator significantly decreased during Periods III and IV. The indicator 'in-hospital mortality' was unchanged within the study duration. Overall, the quality of care for patients with AMI was mildly influenced during the assessed pandemic periods, especially in terms of door-to-electrocardiogram time of <10 min and primary percutaneous coronary intervention received within 90 min of hospital arrival (Period III). Using our study results, hospitals can develop strategies regarding care delivery for patients with AMI during a COVID-19 outbreak on the basis of central government alert levels, even during the height of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods
4.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285375, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233496

ABSTRACT

UK 'Lockdown' measures introduced in March 2020 aimed to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Although seeking healthcare was still permitted within restrictions, paediatric emergency department attendances reduced dramatically and led to concern over risks caused by delayed presentation. Our aim was to gain insight into healthcare decisions faced by parents during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and to understand if use of urgent healthcare, self-care, and information needs differed during lockdown as well as how parents perceived risks of COVID-19. We undertook qualitative telephone interviews with a purposive sample of parents living in the North East of England recruited through online advertising. We used a semi-structured interview schedule to explore past and current healthcare use, perceptions of risk and the impact of the pandemic on healthcare decisions. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Thematic Analysis. Three major themes were identified which concerned (i) how parents made sense of risks posed to, and by their children, (ii) understanding information regarding health services and (iii) attempting to make the right decision. These themes contribute to the understanding of the initial impact of COVID-19 and associated restrictions on parental decisions about urgent healthcare for children. These findings are important to consider when planning for potential future public health emergencies but also in the wider context of encouraging appropriate use of urgent healthcare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Parents
5.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(4): 570-578, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237020

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Unvaccinated emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are at increased risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and potentially transmitting the virus to their families, coworkers, and patients. Effective vaccines for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus exist; however, vaccination rates among EMS professionals remain largely unknown. Consequently, we sought to document vaccination rates of EMS professionals and identify predictors of vaccination uptake. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of North Carolina EMS professionals after the COVID-19 vaccines were widely available. The survey assessed vaccination status as well as beliefs regarding COVID-19 illness and vaccine effectiveness. Prediction of vaccine uptake was modeled using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 860 EMS professionals completed the survey, of whom 74.7% reported receiving the COVID-19 vaccination. Most respondents believed that COVID-19 is a serious threat to the population, that they are personally at higher risk of infection, that vaccine side effects are outweighed by illness prevention, and the vaccine is safe and effective. Despite this, only 18.7% supported mandatory vaccination for EMS professionals. Statistically significant differences were observed between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups regarding vaccine safety and effectiveness, recall of employer vaccine recommendation, perceived risk of infection, degree of threat to the population, and trust in government to take actions to limit the spread of disease. Unvaccinated respondents cited reasons such as belief in personal health and natural immunity as protectors against infection, concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness, inadequate vaccine knowledge, and lack of an employer mandate for declining the vaccine. Predictors of vaccination included belief in vaccine safety (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, P=<0.001) and effectiveness (OR 4.6, P=<0.001); importance of vaccination to protect patients (OR 15.5, P=<0.001); perceived personal risk of infection (OR 1.8, P=0.04); previous receipt of influenza vaccine (OR 2.5, P=0.003); and sufficient knowledge to make an informed decision about vaccination (OR 2.4, P=0.024). CONCLUSION: In this survey of EMS professionals, over a quarter remained unvaccinated for COVID-19. Given the identified predictors of vaccine acceptance, EMS systems should focus on countering misinformation through employee educational campaigns as well as on developing policies regarding workforce immunization requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Health Personnel , Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Decision Making , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Surveys , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , North Carolina , Occupational Health , Patient Safety , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
6.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1180511, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20230726

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, directly and indirectly, affected the emergency medical care system and resulted in worse out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outcomes and epidemiological features compared with those before the pandemic. This review compares the regional and temporal features of OHCA prognosis and epidemiological characteristics. Various databases were searched to compare the OHCA outcomes and epidemiological characteristics during the COVID-19 pandemic with before the pandemic. During the COVID-19 pandemic, survival and favorable neurological outcome rates were significantly lower than before. Survival to hospitalization, return of spontaneous circulation, endotracheal intubation, and use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) decreased significantly, whereas the use of a supraglottic airway device, the incidence of cardiac arrest at home, and response time of emergency medical service (EMS) increased significantly. Bystander CPR, unwitnessed cardiac arrest, EMS transfer time, use of mechanical CPR, and in-hospital target temperature management did not differ significantly. A subgroup analysis of the studies that included only the first wave with those that included the subsequent waves revealed the overall outcomes in which the epidemiological features of OHCA exhibited similar patterns. No significant regional differences between the OHCA survival rates in Asia before and during the pandemic were observed, although other variables varied by region. The COVID-19 pandemic altered the epidemiologic characteristics, survival rates, and neurological prognosis of OHCA patients. Review registration: PROSPERO (CRD42022339435).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest , Humans , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/adverse effects , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/epidemiology , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/etiology
7.
Copenhagen; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; 2023. (WHO/EURO:2023-7637-47404-69640).
in English | WHOIRIS | ID: gwh-369063

ABSTRACT

The lifting of the Public Health Emergency of International Concern status by WHO on 5 May 2023, signaled the start of a new phase of the global pandemic’s response and recovery – during which the WHO Regional Office for Europe will shift towards a longer-term programmatic approach to COVID-19. While the first steps towards recovery from the pandemic have been reported in the European Region multiple challenges remain. This regional transition plan outlines a comprehensive roadmap for transitioning from the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic towards a sustained response and recovery in order to strategically and sustainably invest in resilient health systems able to respond to emergencies and maintain essential services at all times. It is the moment to invest and sustain the gains made during the pandemic response and apply the lessons learned of this pandemic and other recent health emergencies, to increase the resilience of our health systems against future epidemics, pandemics and other shocks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Emergencies , Europe , Emergency Medical Services
9.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 29(3): 175-180, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328145

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite improvements over time, cardiac arrest continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Several methods can be used to achieve airway patency during cardiac arrest, and the optimal strategy continues to be debated. This review will explore and summarize the latest published evidence for airway management during cardiac arrest. RECENT FINDINGS: A large meta-analysis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients found no difference in survival between those receiving tracheal intubation and those treated with a supraglottic airway (SGA). Observational studies of registry data have reported higher survival to hospital discharge in patients receiving tracheal intubation or an SGA but another showed no difference. Rates of intubation during in-hospital cardiac arrest have decreased in the United States, and different airway strategies appear to be used in different centres. SUMMARY: Observational studies continue to dominate the evidence base relating to cardiac arrest airway management. Cardiac arrest registries enable these observational studies to include many patients; however, the design of such studies introduces considerable bias. Further randomized clinical trials are underway. The current evidence does not indicate a substantial improvement in outcome from any single airway strategy.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest , Humans , United States , Airway Management/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Registries , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods
10.
Orv Hetil ; 164(13): 483-487, 2023 Apr 02.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327674

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of the coronavirus disease, infection-related mortality has been tracked worldwide and the number of deaths caused by the virus is counted daily. The coronavirus pandemic has not only transformed our daily life, but reorganized the whole healthcare system. In response to the increased demand for hospital admissions, leaders in different countries have implemented a number of emergency actions. The restructuring has had both direct and indirect negative effects on the epidemiology of sudden cardiac death, the willingness of lay rescuer to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the use of automated external defibrillators, but these negative effects vary widely across continents and countries. In order to protect lay people and health workers as well as to prevent the spread of the pandemic, the previous recommendations of the European Resuscitation Council on basic and advanced life support have undergone a few modifications. Orv Hetil. 2023; 164(13): 483-487.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , Heart Arrest , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Arrest/therapy , Death, Sudden, Cardiac/epidemiology , Death, Sudden, Cardiac/prevention & control
11.
J Surg Res ; 289: 16-21, 2023 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325031

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, we experienced alterations to modes of transportation among trauma patients suffering penetrating injuries. Historically, a small percentage of our penetrating trauma patients use private means of prehospital transportation. Our hypothesis was that the use of private transportation among trauma patients increased during the COVID-19 pandemic and was associated with better outcomes. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all adult trauma patients (January 1, 2017 to March 19, 2021), using the date of the shelter-in-place ordinance (March 19, 2020) to separate trauma patients into prepandemic and pandemic patient groups. Patient demographics, mechanism of injury, mode of prehospital transportation, and variables such as initial Injury Severity Score, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, ICU length of stay, mechanical ventilator days, and mortality were recorded. RESULTS: We identified 11,919 adult trauma patients, 9017 (75.7%) in the prepandemic group and 2902 (24.3%) in the pandemic group. The number of patients using private prehospital transportation also increased (from 2.4% to 6.7%, P < 0.001). Between the prepandemic and pandemic private transportation cohorts, there were reductions in mean Injury Severity Score (from 8.1 ± 10.4 to 5.3 ± 6.6: P = 0.02), ICU admission rates (from 15% to 2.4%: P < 0.001), and hospital length of stay (from 4.0 ± 5.3 to 2.3 ± 1.9: P = 0.02). However, there was no difference in mortality (4.1% and 2.0%, P = 0.221). CONCLUSIONS: We found that there was a significant shift in prehospital transportation among trauma patients toward private transportation after the shelter-in-place order. However, this did not coincide with a change in mortality despite a downward trend. This phenomenon could help direct future policy and protocols in trauma systems when battling major public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Wounds and Injuries , Wounds, Penetrating , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Trauma Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Injury Severity Score , Wounds and Injuries/therapy , Transportation of Patients/methods
12.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 453, 2023 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The goal of Project Austin, an initiative to improve emergency care for rural children who are medically complex (CMC), is to provide an Emergency Information Form (EIF) to their parents/caregivers, to local Emergency Medical Services, and Emergency Departments. EIFs are standard forms recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics that provide pre-planned rapid response instructions, including medical conditions, medications, and care recommendations, for emergency providers. Our objective is to describe the workflows and perceived utility of the provided emergency information forms (EIFs) in the acute medical management of CMC. METHODS: We sampled from two key stakeholder groups in the acute management of CMC: four focus groups with emergency medical providers from rural and urban settings and eight key informant interviews with parents/caregivers enrolled in an emergency medical management program for CMC. Transcripts were thematically analyzed in NVivo© by two coders using a content analysis approach. The thematic codes were combined into a codebook and revised the themes present through combining relevant themes and developing of sub-themes until they reached consensus. RESULTS: All parents/caregivers interviewed were enrolled in Project Austin and had an EIF. Emergency medical providers and parents/caregivers supported the usage of EIFs for CMC. Parents/caregivers also felt EIFs made emergency medical providers more prepared for their child. Providers identified that EIFs helped provide individualized care, however they were not confident the data was current and so felt unsure they could rely on the recommendations on the EIF. CONCLUSION: EIFs are an easy way to engage parents, caregivers, and emergency medical providers about the specifics of a care for CMC during an emergency. Timely updates and electronic access to EIFs could improve their value for medical providers.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Emergency Medical Services , Child , Humans , Workflow , Emergency Service, Hospital , Academies and Institutes
13.
Air Med J ; 42(4): 271-275, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322887

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a severe acute respiratory infection, has spread rapidly around the world. To expand and enhance knowledge regarding virus prevention/transmission, this study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of emergency medical services (EMS) workers as a part of the health care system because of their essential role in the front lines of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted on EMS workers to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward COVID-19. The questionnaire included 5 topics: demographic information, knowledge and attitude questions, professional behavior of employees during the epidemic, and anxiety score. RESULTS: A total of 86 EMS workers answered the questionnaire, and 55.63% of the respondents answered the knowledge questions correctly; knowledge appeared to have no correlation to their education, age, or experience. In addition, there was no apparent correlation between the infection rate and exposure to an infected or suspected patient. CONCLUSION: The findings of the present study indicate that more than half of the EMS workers have good knowledge about the epidemic, and the level of knowledge was not related to their demographic characteristics. The results of professional behaviors showed a high level of compliance with the principles and guidelines by workers, and the absence of a relationship between employees' contamination and exposure to infected patients supports the awareness and legality of EMS workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Iran/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Personnel
14.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 799, 2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319041

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health and social measures, decreasing patient numbers have been described in various healthcare settings in Germany, including emergency care. This could be explained by changes in disease burden, e.g. due to contact restrictions, but could also be a result of changes in utilisation behaviour of the population. To better understand those dynamics, we analysed routine data from emergency departments to quantify changes in consultation numbers, age distribution, disease acuity and day and hour of the day during different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We used interrupted time series analyses to estimate relative changes for consultation numbers of 20 emergency departments spread throughout Germany. For the pandemic period (16-03-2020 - 13-06-2021) four different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic were defined as interruption points, the pre-pandemic period (06-03-2017 - 09-03-2020) was used as the reference. RESULTS: The most pronounced decreases were visible in the first and second wave of the pandemic, with changes of - 30.0% (95%CI: - 32.2%; - 27.7%) and - 25.7% (95%CI: - 27.4%; - 23.9%) for overall consultations, respectively. The decrease was even stronger for the age group of 0-19 years, with - 39.4% in the first and - 35.0% in the second wave. Regarding acuity levels, consultations assessed as urgent, standard, and non-urgent showed the largest decrease, while the most severe cases showed the smallest decrease. CONCLUSIONS: The number of emergency department consultations decreased rapidly during the COVID-19 pandemic, without extensive variation in the distribution of patient characteristics. Smallest changes were observed for the most severe consultations and older age groups, which is especially reassuring regarding concerns of possible long-term complications due to patients avoiding urgent emergency care during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Aged , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Germany/epidemiology
15.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e069494, 2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318188

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Emergency care services are rapidly expanding in Africa; however, development must focus on quality. The African Federation of Emergency Medicine consensus conference (AFEM-CC)-based quality indicators were published in 2018. This study sought to increase knowledge of quality through identifying all publications from Africa containing data relevant to the AFEM-CC process clinical and outcome quality indicators. DESIGN: We conducted searches for general quality of emergency care in Africa and for each of 28 AFEM-CC process clinical and five outcome clinical quality indicators individually in the medical and grey literature. DATA SOURCES: PubMed (1964-2 January 2022), Embase (1947-2 January 2022) and CINAHL (1982-3 January 2022) and various forms of grey literature were queried. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Studies published in English, addressing the African emergency care population as a whole or large subsegment of this population (eg, trauma, paediatrics), and matching AFEM-CC process quality indicator parameters exactly were included. Studies with similar, but not exact match, data were collected separately as 'AFEM-CC quality indicators near match'. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Document screening was done in duplicate by two authors, using Covidence, and conflicts were adjudicated by a third. Simple descriptive statistics were calculated. RESULTS: One thousand three hundred and fourteen documents were reviewed, 314 in full text. 41 studies met a priori criteria and were included, yielding 59 unique quality indicator data points. Documentation and assessment quality indicators accounted for 64% of data points identified, clinical care for 25% and outcomes for 10%. An additional 53 'AFEM-CC quality indicators near match' publications were identified (38 new publications and 15 previously identified studies that contained additional 'near match' data), yielding 87 data points. CONCLUSIONS: Data relevant to African emergency care facility-based quality indicators are highly limited. Future publications on emergency care in Africa should be aware of, and conform with, AFEM-CC quality indicators to strengthen understanding of quality.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medical Services , Quality Indicators, Health Care , Humans , Child , Africa , Awareness , Consensus
16.
J Trauma Nurs ; 30(3): 186-190, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic prevented centers from providing in-person interactive training programs such as the Rural Trauma Team Development Course. Adapting the course to a virtual platform is an option, yet little is known regarding the feasibility of using this format. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of providing a virtual rural trauma development course during COVID-19. METHODS: This is a descriptive study of emergency medical technicians, nurses, emergency department technicians, and physicians from four rural community health care facilities and local emergency medical services who participated in a virtual Rural Trauma Team Development Course held in November 2021 which was transformed into a virtual platform using live remote interactive lectures, recorded case-based scenarios, and interactive virtual-based questions. The course was evaluated by the changes instituted at the centers based on program recommendations and a participant survey. RESULTS: A total of 41 participants were studied, of whom 31 (75%) returned the emailed postprogram survey. The majority (>75%) of respondents rated the activity as very good, with course objectives met. All four facilities instituted changes following the program, including enhancing policy and procedures, guidelines, advancing performance improvement triggers, and equipment acquisition. Individual-reported participant satisfaction was very high. CONCLUSION: The Rural Trauma Team Development Course can be provided virtually and is a feasible option for trauma centers to provide initial trauma management in the rural community in a safe pandemic-restrictive atmosphere.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Trauma Centers
17.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7796, 2023 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320820

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) brought a healthy crisis all around the world. It's not only affected healthcare utilization, but also some disease's incidence. We collected pre-hospital emergency data in Chengdu from January 2016 to December 2021, and studied the demand for emergency medical services (EMSs), emergency response times (ERTs), and the disease spectrum in the city proper of Chengdu as a whole. A total of 1,122,294 prehospital emergency medical service (EMS) instances met the inclusion criteria. Under the influence of COVID-19, notably in 2020, the epidemiological characteristics of prehospital emergency services in Chengdu were considerably altered. However, as the pandemic was brought under control, they returned to normal or even earlier in 2021.The COVID-19 pandemic had an effect on people's medical care-seeking behavior and the performance of prehospital emergency services. Although the indicators associated with prehospital emergency services eventually recovered as the epidemic was brought under control, they remained marginally different from before the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hospitals , Retrospective Studies
18.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1151506, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319457

ABSTRACT

Background: Although acute myocardial infarction (AMI) requires timely intervention, limited nationwide data is available regarding the association between disruption of emergency services and outcomes of patients with AMI during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Moreover, whether diabetes mellitus (DM) adversely affects disease severity in these patients has not yet been investigated. Methods: This nationwide population-based study analyzed 45,648 patients with AMI, using data from the national registry of emergency departments (ED) in Korea. Frequency of ED visits and disease severity were compared between the COVID-19 outbreak period (year 2020) and the control period (the previous year 2019). Results: The number of ED visits by patients with AMI decreased during the first, second, and third waves of the outbreak period compared to the corresponding time period in the control period (all p-values < 0.05). A longer duration from symptom onset to ED visit (p = 0.001) and ED stay (p = 0.001) and higher rates of resuscitation, ventilation care, and extracorporeal membrane oxygen insertion were observed during the outbreak period than during the control period (all p-values < 0.05). These findings were exacerbated in patients with comorbid DM; Compared to patients without DM, patients with DM demonstrated delayed ED visits, longer ED stays, more intensive care unit admissions (p < 0.001), longer hospitalizations (p < 0.001), and higher rates of resuscitation, intubation, and hemodialysis (all p-values < 0.05) during the outbreak period. While in-hospital mortality was similar in AMI patients with and without comorbid DM during the two periods (4.3 vs. 4.4%; p = 0.671), patients with DM who had other comorbidities such as chronic kidney disease or heart failure or were aged ≥ 80 years had higher in-hospital mortality compared with those without any of the comorbidities (3.1 vs. 6.0%; p < 0.001). Conclusion: During the pandemic, the number of patients with AMI presenting to the ED decreased compared with that of the previous year, while the disease severity increased, particularly in patients with comorbid DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Emergency Medical Services , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
19.
Orv Hetil ; 164(12): 443-448, 2023 Mar 26.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2310150

ABSTRACT

Survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains low across Europe. In the last decade, involving bystanders turned out to be one of the most important key factors in improving the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Beside recognizing cardiac arrest and initiate chest compressions, bystanders could be also involved in delivering early defibrillation. Although adult basic life support is a sequence of simple interventions that can be easily learnt even by schoolchildren, non-technical skills and emotional components can complicate real-life situations. This recognition combined with modern technology brings a new point of view in teaching and implementation. We review the latest practice guidelines and new advances in the education (including the importance of non-technical skills) of out-of-hospital adult basic life support, also considering the effects of COVID-19 pandemic. We briefly present the Szív City application developed to support the involvement of lay rescuers. Orv Hetil. 2023; 164(12): 443-448.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Emergency Medical Services , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest , Adult , Humans , Child , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Hospitals
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