Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e174, 2020 08 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695910

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global health threat. A hospital in Zhuhai adopted several measures in Fever Clinic Management (FCM) to respond to the outbreak of COVID-19. FCM has been proved to be effective in preventing nosocomial cross infection. Faced with the emergency, the hospital undertook creative operational steps in relation to the control and spread of COVID-19, with special focuses on physical and administrative layout of buildings, staff training and preventative procedures. The first operational step was to set up triaging stations at all entrances and then complete a standard and qualified fever clinic, which was isolated from the other buildings within our hospital complex. Secondly, the hospital established its human resource reservation for emergency response and the allocation of human resources to ensure strict and standardised training methods through the hospital for all medical staff and ancillary employees. Thirdly, the hospital divided the fever clinic into partitioned areas and adapted a three-level triaging system. The experiences shared in this paper would be of practical help for the facilities that are encountering or will encounter the challenges of COVID-19, i.e. to prevent nosocomial cross infection among patients and physicians.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Fever/therapy , Hospital Design and Construction/standards , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Teaching , Time Factors , Triage/methods , Ventilation/standards , Workflow , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
2.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e161, 2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679968

ABSTRACT

After the 2003 SARS epidemic, China started constructing a primary-level emergency response system and focused on strengthening and implementation of policies, resource allocation. After 17 years of restructuring, China's primary-level response capabilities towards public health emergencies have greatly improved. During the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic, primary-level administrative and medical personnel, social organisations, volunteers, etc. have played a significant role in providing professional services utilising the primary-level emergency response system of 17 years. However, China's organisations did not learn their lesson from the SARS epidemic, and certain problems are exposed in the system. By analysing the experience and shortcomings of China's disease prevention and control system at the primary level, we can focus on the development of disease control systems for major epidemics in the future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Epidemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Health/standards , China , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Health Policy/trends , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Information Technology/trends , Vulnerable Populations
3.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 505-510, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612987

ABSTRACT

The French-language Respiratory Medicine Society (SPLF) proposes a guide for the follow-up of patients who have presented with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The proposals are based on known data from previous epidemics, on acute lesions observed in SARS-CoV-2 patients and on expert opinion. This guide proposes a follow-up based on three categories of patients: (1) patients managed outside hospital for possible or proven SARS-CoV-2 infection, referred by their physician for persistent dyspnoea; (2) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a medical unit; (3) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in an intensive care unit. The subsequent follow-up will have to be adapted to the initial assessment. This guide emphasises the possibility of others causes of dyspnoea (cardiac, thromboembolic, hyperventilation syndrome…). These proposals may evolve over time as more knowledge becomes available.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aftercare/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System/standards , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Respiratory Therapy/standards , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
5.
Prehosp Disaster Med ; 35(4): 451-453, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-546918

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), a new respiratory disease, is spreading globally. In France, Emergency Medical Service (EMS) teams are mobile medicalized resuscitation teams composed of emergency physician, nurse or anesthesiologist nurse, ambulance driver, and resident. Four types of clinical cases are presented here because they have led these EMS teams to change practices in their management of patients suspected of COVID-19 infection: cardiac arrest, hypoxia on an acute pneumonia, acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation with respiratory and hemodynamic disorders, and upper function disorders in a patient in a long-term care facility. The last case raised the question of COVID-19 cases with atypical forms in elderly subjects. Providers were contaminated during the management of these patients. These cases highlighted the need to review the way these EMS teams are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, in view of heightening potential for early identification of suspicious cases, and of reinforcing the application of staff protection equipment to limit risk of contamination.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disaster Planning , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Planning Techniques , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
8.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 505-510, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-274082

ABSTRACT

The French-language Respiratory Medicine Society (SPLF) proposes a guide for the follow-up of patients who have presented with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The proposals are based on known data from previous epidemics, on acute lesions observed in SARS-CoV-2 patients and on expert opinion. This guide proposes a follow-up based on three categories of patients: (1) patients managed outside hospital for possible or proven SARS-CoV-2 infection, referred by their physician for persistent dyspnoea; (2) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a medical unit; (3) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in an intensive care unit. The subsequent follow-up will have to be adapted to the initial assessment. This guide emphasises the possibility of others causes of dyspnoea (cardiac, thromboembolic, hyperventilation syndrome…). These proposals may evolve over time as more knowledge becomes available.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aftercare/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System/standards , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Respiratory Therapy/standards , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
10.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 505-510, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260298

ABSTRACT

The French-language Respiratory Medicine Society (SPLF) proposes a guide for the follow-up of patients who have presented with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The proposals are based on known data from previous epidemics, on acute lesions observed in SARS-CoV-2 patients and on expert opinion. This guide proposes a follow-up based on three categories of patients: (1) patients managed outside hospital for possible or proven SARS-CoV-2 infection, referred by their physician for persistent dyspnoea; (2) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a medical unit; (3) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in an intensive care unit. The subsequent follow-up will have to be adapted to the initial assessment. This guide emphasises the possibility of others causes of dyspnoea (cardiac, thromboembolic, hyperventilation syndrome…). These proposals may evolve over time as more knowledge becomes available.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aftercare/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System/standards , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Respiratory Therapy/standards , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
11.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(5): 1125-1131, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-40445

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to prevent cross-infection in the operating room during emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by following anesthesia management protocols, and to document clinical- and anesthesia-related characteristics of these patients. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, multicenter clinical study. SETTING: This study used a multicenter dataset from 4 hospitals in Wuhan, China. PARTICIPANTS: Patients and health care providers with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV from January 23 to 31, 2020, at the Wuhan Union Hospital, the Wuhan Children's Hospital, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, and the Wuhan Fourth Hospital in Wuhan, China. INTERVENTIONS: Anesthetic management and infection control guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were drafted and applied in 4 hospitals in Wuhan. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Cross-infection in the operating rooms of the 4 hospitals was effectively reduced by implementing the new measures and procedures. The majority of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection or suspected infection were female (23 [62%] of 37), and the mean age was 41.0 years old (standard deviation 19.6; range 4-78). 10 (27%) patients had chronic medical illnesses, including 4 (11%) with diabetes, 8 (22%) with hypertension, and 8 (22%) with digestive system disease. Twenty-five (68%) patients presented with lymphopenia, and 23 (62%) patients exhibited multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on computed tomography scanning. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates that COVID 19-specific guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV may effectively prevent cross-infection in the operating room. Most patients with confirmed or suspected COVID 19 presented with fever and dry cough and demonstrated bilateral multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on chest computed tomography scans.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Coronavirus Infections , Cross Infection , Emergency Medical Services , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia/methods , Anesthesia/standards , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
12.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(5): 1125-1131, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-10173

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to prevent cross-infection in the operating room during emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by following anesthesia management protocols, and to document clinical- and anesthesia-related characteristics of these patients. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, multicenter clinical study. SETTING: This study used a multicenter dataset from 4 hospitals in Wuhan, China. PARTICIPANTS: Patients and health care providers with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV from January 23 to 31, 2020, at the Wuhan Union Hospital, the Wuhan Children's Hospital, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, and the Wuhan Fourth Hospital in Wuhan, China. INTERVENTIONS: Anesthetic management and infection control guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were drafted and applied in 4 hospitals in Wuhan. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Cross-infection in the operating rooms of the 4 hospitals was effectively reduced by implementing the new measures and procedures. The majority of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection or suspected infection were female (23 [62%] of 37), and the mean age was 41.0 years old (standard deviation 19.6; range 4-78). 10 (27%) patients had chronic medical illnesses, including 4 (11%) with diabetes, 8 (22%) with hypertension, and 8 (22%) with digestive system disease. Twenty-five (68%) patients presented with lymphopenia, and 23 (62%) patients exhibited multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on computed tomography scanning. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates that COVID 19-specific guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV may effectively prevent cross-infection in the operating room. Most patients with confirmed or suspected COVID 19 presented with fever and dry cough and demonstrated bilateral multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on chest computed tomography scans.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Coronavirus Infections , Cross Infection , Emergency Medical Services , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia/methods , Anesthesia/standards , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
14.
Emerg Med Pract ; 22(2 Suppl 2): 1-21, 2020 02 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2815

ABSTRACT

Prior to the global outbreak of SARS-CoV in 2003, HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 were the only coronaviruses known to infect humans. Following the SARS outbreak, 5 additional coronaviruses have been discovered in humans, most recently the novel coronavirus COVID-19, believed to have originated in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. SARS-CoV and MERSCoV are particularly pathogenic in humans and are associated with high mortality. In this review, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of the recently discovered COVID-19 are reviewed, with a focus on best practices and the public health implications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Emergency Medical Services , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS Virus/pathogenicity
15.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(5): 1125-1131, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to prevent cross-infection in the operating room during emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by following anesthesia management protocols, and to document clinical- and anesthesia-related characteristics of these patients. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, multicenter clinical study. SETTING: This study used a multicenter dataset from 4 hospitals in Wuhan, China. PARTICIPANTS: Patients and health care providers with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV from January 23 to 31, 2020, at the Wuhan Union Hospital, the Wuhan Children's Hospital, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, and the Wuhan Fourth Hospital in Wuhan, China. INTERVENTIONS: Anesthetic management and infection control guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with suspected 2019-nCoV were drafted and applied in 4 hospitals in Wuhan. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Cross-infection in the operating rooms of the 4 hospitals was effectively reduced by implementing the new measures and procedures. The majority of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection or suspected infection were female (23 [62%] of 37), and the mean age was 41.0 years old (standard deviation 19.6; range 4-78). 10 (27%) patients had chronic medical illnesses, including 4 (11%) with diabetes, 8 (22%) with hypertension, and 8 (22%) with digestive system disease. Twenty-five (68%) patients presented with lymphopenia, and 23 (62%) patients exhibited multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on computed tomography scanning. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates that COVID 19-specific guidelines for emergency procedures for patients with confirmed or suspected 2019-nCoV may effectively prevent cross-infection in the operating room. Most patients with confirmed or suspected COVID 19 presented with fever and dry cough and demonstrated bilateral multiple mottling and ground-glass opacity on chest computed tomography scans.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Coronavirus Infections , Cross Infection , Emergency Medical Services , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia/methods , Anesthesia/standards , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL