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1.
BMC Emerg Med ; 23(1): 63, 2023 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a catastrophic event worldwide. Since then, people's way of living has changed in terms of personal behavior, social interaction, and medical-seeking behavior, including change of the emergency department (ED) visiting patterns. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the ED visiting patterns of the older people to explore its variable expression with the intention of ameliorating an effective and suitable response to public health emergencies. METHODS: This was a retrospective study conducted in three hospitals of the Cathay Health System in Taiwan. Patients aged ≥ 65 years who presented to the ED between January 21, 2020, and April 30, 2020 (pandemic stage), and between January 21, 2019, and April 30, 2019 (pre-pandemic stage) were enrolled in the study. Basic demographics, including visit characteristics, disposition, and chief complaints of the patients visiting the ED between these two periods of time, were compared and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 16,655 older people were included in this study. A 20.91% reduction in ED older adult patient visits was noted during the pandemic period. During the pandemic, there was a decrease in ambulance use among elderly patients visiting the ED, with the proportion decreasing from 16.90 to 16.58%. Chief complaints of fever, upper respiratory infections, psychological and social problems increased, with incidence risk ratios (IRRs) of 1.12, 1.23, 1.25, and 5.2, respectively. Meanwhile, the incidence of both non-life-threatening and life-threatening complaints decreased, with IRRs of 0.72 and 0.83, respectively. CONCLUSION: Health education regarding life-threatening symptom signs among older adult patients and avocation of the proper timing to seek medical attention via ambulance were crucial issues during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital
2.
Clin Transl Sci ; 16(6): 915-921, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233861

ABSTRACT

Clinical Research Coordinators (CRCs) are vital collaborators in a clinical research project. They often are the primary liaisons between investigators and human participants in studies and are involved in every aspect of many protocols, including participant recruitment, care (both usual medical care and specific study-related monitoring and procedures), data collection, specimen processing, and follow-up. The Clinical Translational Science Award program, which was created by the National Institutes of Health in 2006, has significantly expanded the venues in which Clinical Research Resource (CRR) - based CRCs are embedded. CRCs functioning in these areas, outside of the research-focused in-patient environment of the CRR, are designated as "off-site" CRCs. Many of these locations, such as intensive care units and emergency departments, require that CRCs interact regularly with healthcare providers whose primary functions are focused on providing optimal patient care rather than research and often involving very complex patients. These off-site CRCs require additional training and support outside of the usual research-oriented environment of the CRR. They are required to function within the context of the patient-care team while fostering implementation of collaborative research. This is a description of such a program specifically geared to off-site CRCs with the goal of enhancing the quality of research and experiences of CRCs.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital , Health Personnel , United States , Humans , Data Collection , Intensive Care Units , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
3.
NCHS Data Brief ; (469): 1-8, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233715

ABSTRACT

With the disruptions to access and use of care caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency department (ED) visit rates decreased from 2019 to 2020 among children and adolescents (1). The ED visit rate for children under age 1 year in 2020 was nearly one-half of the rate in 2019, and the rate for those aged 1-17 years decreased over the same period (2). This report uses data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) (3,4) to compare ED visits for children aged 0-17 from 2019 to 2020, by age group, sex, and race and ethnicity, and to assess changes in wait time at ED visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Ethnicity
4.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 39(7): 542-547, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240483

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We examined emergency department (ED) mental health visit trends by children in relation to periods of school closure and reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic in Alberta, Canada. METHODS: Mental health visits by school-aged children (5 to <18 years) were extracted from the Emergency Department Information System, a province-wide database, from March 11, 2020, to November 30, 2021 (pandemic period; n = 18,997) and March 1, 2019, to March 10, 2020 (1-year, prepandemic comparator period; n = 11,540). We calculated age-specific visit rates and compared rate differences between periods of school closure (March 15-June 30, 2020; November 30, 2020-January 10, 2021; April 22-June 30, 2021) and reopening (September 4-November 29, 2020; January 11-April 21, 2021; September 3-November 30, 2021) to matched prepandemic periods. We used a ratio of relative risk to examine the risk of a visit during closures versus reopenings. RESULTS: The cohort included 11,540 prepandemic visits and 18,997 pandemic visits. Compared with prepandemic periods, ED visit rates increased across all ages during the first (+85.53%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 73.68% to 100.41%) and third (+19.92%; 95% CI, 13.28% to 26.95%) school closures, and decreased during the second closure (-15.37%; 95% CI, -22.22% to -7.92%). During school reopenings, visit rates decreased across all ages during the first reopening (-9.30%; 95% CI, -13.94% to -4.41%) and increased during the third reopening (+13.59%; 95% CI, 8.13% to 19.34%); rates did not change significantly during the second reopening (2.54%; 95% CI, -3.45% to 8.90%). The risk of a visit during school closure versus reopening was only higher for the first closure with 2.06 times the risk (95% CI, 1.88 to 2.25). CONCLUSIONS: Emergency department mental health visit rates were highest during the first school closure of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the risk of a visit during this closure period was twice compared with when schools first reopened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Alberta/epidemiology , Mental Health , Emergency Service, Hospital
5.
Am J Emerg Med ; 69: 154-159, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239862

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms need to appropriately transition their care to a GI outpatient clinic in a timely manner to have their health needs met and avoid significant morbidity. When this transition isn't optimal, patients are lost to follow-up, potentially placing them at risk for adverse events. We sought to study the effectiveness of implementing an electronic medical record (EMR) based transition-of-care (TOC) program from the ED to outpatient GI clinics. METHODS: We performed a retrospective single center cohort study of patients discharged from the ED of a tertiary care academic medical center referred to outpatient GI clinic before (Pre-TOC patients) and after implementation of an EMR based TOC program (TOC patients). We further stratified patients based on the Distressed Communities Index (DCI), which is a composite measure of economic well-being. We compared rates of appointment scheduling and appointment attendance between the two groups, as well as 30-day readmission rates to the ED. We also performed a subgroup analysis to determine if socioeconomic status would affect patient follow-up rates. RESULTS: We included 380 Pre-TOC and 399 TOC patients in our analysis. TOC patients were found to both schedule appointments (50% vs 27% p-value <0.01) as well as show up to appointments (34% vs 24% p-value <0.01) at significantly higher rates compared to Pre-TOC patients. There was no significant difference between 30-day readmission rates between the two groups. In addition, TOC patients from At-Risk and Distressed Communities were over 22 times more likely to schedule an appointment compared to Pre-TOC patients from similar neighborhoods (OR 22.18, 95% CI 4.23-116.32). CONCLUSION: Our study shows that patients who are discharged from the ED with outpatient GI follow-up are more likely to both schedule and show up to appointments with implementation of an EMR-based direct referral program compared to no patient navigation, particularly among patients of lower socioeconomic status.


Subject(s)
Gastroenterology , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , Cohort Studies , Retrospective Studies , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Appointments and Schedules , Emergency Service, Hospital
6.
Am J Emerg Med ; 69: 34-38, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Drowning is a common mechanism of injury in the pediatric population that often requires hospitalization. The primary objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of pediatric drowning patients evaluated in a pediatric emergency department (PED), including the clinical interventions and outcomes of this patient population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of pediatric patients evaluated in a mid-Atlantic urban pediatric emergency department from January 2017 to December 2020 after a drowning event. RESULTS: Eighty patients ages 0-18 were identified, representing 57 79 unintentional events and 1 intentional self-injury event. The majority of patients (50%) were 1-4 years of age. The majority (65%) of patients 4 years of age or younger were White, whereas racial/ethnic minority patients accounted for the majority (73%) of patients 5 years of age or older. Most drowning events (74%) occurred in a pool, on Friday through Saturday (66%) and during the summer (73%). Oxygen was used in 54% of admitted patients and only in 9% of discharged patients. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed in 74% of admitted patients and 33% of discharged patients. CONCLUSIONS: Drowning can be an intentional or unintentional source of injury in pediatric patients. Among the patients who presented to the emergency department for drowning, more than half received CPR and/or were admitted, suggesting high acuity and severity of these events. In this study population, outdoor pools, summer season and weekends are potential high yield targets for drowning prevention efforts.


Subject(s)
Drowning , Child , Humans , Infant , Child, Preschool , Drowning/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Ethnicity , Minority Groups , Emergency Service, Hospital
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1169764, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238996

ABSTRACT

Background: Occupational stress is one of the major occupational health hazards globally. This study investigated the current situation of and factors influencing the occupational stress of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (EDs) after contracting coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Methods: An online questionnaire survey was conducted among physicians and nurses in EDs in China between January 5 and 8, 2023. A general descriptive analysis of variables was conducted, the differences in the occupational stress of physicians and nurses in EDs with different characteristics were analyzed using the chi-square test, and factors influencing occupational stress were investigated using generalized ordinal logistic regression. Results: Of the 1924 physicians and nurses in EDs who contracted COVID-19, 64.71% considered their occupational stress high or very high, with overly intense work as the primary stressor. Those with ≥ 10 years of work tenure, working in tertiary hospitals and with higher professional titles were more stressed, while females, nurses, those with a master's degree or higher, and those who continued to work after contracting COVID-19 were less stressed. There were differences in the predictors of occupational stress between physicians and nurses. Conclusion: China's physicians and nurses in EDs had high occupational stress after contracting COVID-19. Attention should be given to the occupational mental health of physicians and nurses in EDs, and training on the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 infection should be strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Physicians , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 559, 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238695

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As a result of the new coronavirus pandemic, a highly complex academic hospital in Latin America implemented a telemedicine service for the care of obstetric, pediatric, and adult patients. In 2020, regional emergency services collapsed due to the increase in demand for care, generating the need to open expansion services and seek strategies to provide timely care to consulting patients. OBJECTIVE: We retrospectively describe the clinical experience of patients who consulted the emergency department via telemedicine across a videoconference tool using digital platforms. METHODS: A descriptive study with retrospective data collection was conducted to describe the implementation of the teleconsultation care model for patients. We constructed the clinical process indicators to evaluate the model. RESULTS: A total of 4652 teleconsultations were registered. Telemedicine consultation was above 50% in the country and department and above 90% in Cali city. The average waiting time for care was estimated to be 1:59:52 h. A total of 275 patients were transferred to the emergency room after consultation. The principal reasons for consultation in the institutional telemedicine program were respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms. Teleconsultations related to SARS-COV 2 infections reported 3775 patients (3127 with unidentified virus and 648 with the identified virus). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is a tool that provides support and guidance to patients who consult emergency departments, reducing barriers to access health care and decreasing emergency department collapse.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Adult , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Child , Retrospective Studies , Latin America/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals, University
9.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0286398, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238504

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People experienced various stress and psychological responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aimed to examine the changes in emergency medical services (EMSs) utilization by self-harm patients in early pandemic and the impacts of physical distancing measures on the EMSs utilization by self-harm patients. METHODS: Data for all patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) after self-harm injuries including self-poisoning were collected from the National ED Information System (NEDIS). Characteristics of patients in two study regions (urban versus rural) were compared. Weekly and annual ED visit rates after self-harm (VRSH) per 100,000 population were calculated. Mobile phone mobility index (MPMI) was calculated by dividing a region's aggregated mobile phone mobility by mid-year population. Joinpoint regression analysis was conducted to assess changes in 2020 over pre-pandemic years. Test for presence of joinpoint at the end of 2019 was performed. A cross-correlation function was used to estimate the maximal morphological similarity and lag time between changes in MPMI and VRSH. RESULTS: In 2020, in early phases of the pandemic, there was a moderate decline in self-harm-related ED visits to 30,797 from a continuously increasing trend seen in previous years. However, proportions of young people (50.1%) and females (62.3%) increased over previous years. VRSHs among women and young people aged 15-34 years showed higher levels in 2020 than in previous five years. There was a significant decrease in the proportion of patients transported directly from the scene. In addition, there was a polarization of mental state upon ED arrival from alert and unresponsive. The median correlation coefficient between MPMI values and VRSH values was 0.601 (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.539-0.619) in urban regions and 0.531 (IQR: 0.454-0.595) in rural regions, showing no statistically significant difference between the two. CONCLUSION: Physical distancing measures adopted to prevent the spread of transmittable diseases following the pandemic had the effect of decreasing ED visits due to self-harm. When the pandemic has ended, and daily life has been restored, it will be particularly important to pay attention to the increased numbers of self-harm patients expected to visit EDs compared to during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Injurious Behavior , Humans , Female , Adolescent , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Self-Injurious Behavior/epidemiology , Self-Injurious Behavior/prevention & control , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
10.
JAMA ; 329(24): 2129, 2023 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238394

ABSTRACT

In this narrative medicine essay, an infectious diseases physician compares her past near bucolic experience in the emergency department when treated for anaphylaxis with the now perpetually chaotic and crowded scene ushered in by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , Humans , Emergency Service, Hospital
11.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 522, 2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The geographical, cultural, and linguistic proximity between Taiwan and Mainland China has facilitated rapid growth of cross-strait interactions. Both countries have developed online health consultation platforms on the Internet for the public to access healthcare related information. This study examines factors that influence loyalty to a specific online health consultation platform (OHCP) from a cross-strait perspective. METHODS: Based on the Expectation Confirmation Theory and the combined Trust, Perceived Health Risks and Culture, we examine factors that influence loyalty to OHCPs among cross-strait users by investigating the roles of trust, perceived health risks, and culture. Data was collected through a questionnaire survey. RESULTS: The research models used provide a high-power explanation of loyalty to OHCPs. Results generally align with those of previous studies, with the exception of the relationships between Perceived Health Risks and Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Usefulness and Loyalty, Confirmation and Satisfaction, and Trust and Loyalty. In other words, culture may have moderated these relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Findings can help promote OHCPs among cross-strait users to make things easier for patients, and further reduce the load on the emergency department, especially in view of the still ongoing issues related to global outbreak of Coronavirus disease by facilitating early detection of potential cases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Humans , China , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital , Referral and Consultation
13.
Am J Emerg Med ; 69: 160-166, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235521

ABSTRACT

Individuals experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and/or human trafficking (HT) are at increased risk of severe health consequences as a result of legislation criminalizing and/or restricting abortion, which is expected to increase as a result of the Supreme Court decision Dobbs v. Jackson. These risks are further stratified by race, socioeconomics, and other marginalizing demographic attributes. IPV and HT introduce barriers to maintaining physical and mental health, due to control of access to transportation and funds by the abuser, fear of retribution for seeking healthcare, and other barriers. Individuals experiencing IPV or HT often lack reproductive autonomy, as a result of facing reproductive coercion at the hands of their abusers. Following the Dobbs decision, these vulnerable patient populations will face further limitations on their reproductive autonomy and increased obstacles to obtaining an abortion if they medically need or desire one. This will likely result in more patients presenting to the emergency department due to complications from unsafe or unsupervised self-managed abortions, as well as patients being reluctant to report having obtained an unlawful abortion due to fear of legal consequences. This is particularly relevant to individuals experiencing IPV and HT, as they may be more likely to use these methods for obtaining an abortion due to numerous barriers. Emergency medicine clinicians are vital in providing care to these patients, as they frequently present to emergency departments. A multi-pronged approach to better support these patients is essential, involving an increased index of suspicion for IPV, HT or the complications of unsupervised abortion, improved organizational structures, specialized training for staff, improved screening methods, reflection on implicit bias, and recommendations for mindful documentation and legal considerations.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Induced , Abortion, Spontaneous , Intimate Partner Violence , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Emotions , Emergency Service, Hospital
14.
Am J Emerg Med ; 69: 5-10, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244366

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Prior data have suggested that suboptimal antibiotic prescribing in the emergency department (ED) is common for uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), urinary tract infections (UTI), and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). The objective of this study was to measure the effect of indication-based antibiotic order sentences (AOS) on optimal antibiotic prescribing in the ED. METHODS: This was an IRB-approved quasi-experiment of adults prescribed antibiotics in EDs for uncomplicated LRTI, UTI, or ABSSSI from January to June 2019 (pre-implementation) and September to December 2021 (post-implementation). AOS implementation occurred in July 2021. AOS are lean process, electronic discharge prescriptions retrievable by name or indication within the discharge order field. The primary outcome was optimal prescribing, defined as correct antibiotic selection, dose, and duration per local and national guidelines. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were performed; multivariable logistic regression was used to determine variables associated with optimal prescribing. RESULTS: A total of 294 patients were included: 147 pre-group and 147 post-group. Overall optimal prescribing improved from 12 (8%) to 34 (23%) (P < 0.001). Individual components of optimal prescribing were optimal selection at 90 (61%) vs 117 (80%) (P < 0.001), optimal dose at 99 (67%) vs 115 (78%) (P = 0.036), and optimal duration at 38 (26%) vs 50 (34%) (P = 0.13) for pre- and post-group, respectively. AOS was independently associated with optimal prescribing after multivariable logistic regression analysis (adjOR, 3.6; 95%CI,1.7-7.2). A post-hoc analysis showed low uptake of AOS by ED prescribers. CONCLUSIONS: AOS are an efficient and promising strategy to enhance antimicrobial stewardship in the ED.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship , Respiratory Tract Infections , Urinary Tract Infections , Adult , Humans , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Urinary Tract Infections/drug therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Inappropriate Prescribing
17.
Lancet Respir Med ; 11(7): 588, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327703
18.
East. Mediterr. health j ; 29(4): 229-303, 2023-04.
Article in English | WHOIRIS | ID: gwh-368528

ABSTRACT

Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal is the official health journal published by the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office of the World Health Organization. It is a forum for the presentation and promotion of new policies and initiatives in health services; and for the exchange of ideas concepts epidemiological data research findings and other information with special reference to the Eastern Mediterranean Region. It addresses all members of the health profession medical and other health educational institutes interested NGOs WHO Collaborating Centres and individuals within and outside the Region


المجلة الصحية لشرق المتوسط هى المجلة الرسمية التى تصدرعن المكتب الاقليمى لشرق المتوسط بمنظمة الصحة العالمية. وهى منبر لتقديم السياسات والمبادرات الجديدة فى الصحة العامة والخدمات الصحية والترويج لها، و لتبادل الاراء و المفاهيم والمعطيات الوبائية ونتائج الابحاث وغير ذلك من المعلومات، و خاصة ما يتعلق منها باقليم شرق المتوسط. وهى موجهة الى كل اعضاء المهن الصحية، والكليات الطبية وسائر المعاهد التعليمية، و كذا المنظمات غير الحكومية المعنية، والمراكز المتعاونة مع منظمة الصحة العالمية والافراد المهتمين بالصحة فى الاقليم و خارجه


La Revue de Santé de la Méditerranée Orientale est une revue de santé officielle publiée par le Bureau régional de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé pour la Méditerranée orientale. Elle offre une tribune pour la présentation et la promotion de nouvelles politiques et initiatives dans le domaine de la santé publique et des services de santé ainsi qu’à l’échange d’idées de concepts de données épidémiologiques de résultats de recherches et d’autres informations se rapportant plus particulièrement à la Région de la Méditerranée orientale. Elle s’adresse à tous les professionnels de la santé aux membres des instituts médicaux et autres instituts de formation médico-sanitaire aux ONG Centres collaborateurs de l’OMS et personnes concernés au sein et hors de la Région


Subject(s)
Hospitals , Mental Health , Personal Protective Equipment , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Betacoronavirus , Pediatrics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Vaccination , Asthma , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Dementia , Vaccines , Mediterranean Region
19.
East. Mediterr. health j ; 29(4): 271-275, 2023-04.
Article in English | WHOIRIS | ID: gwh-368521

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic caused people to stay indoors, resulting in social isolation and reluctance to access healthcare services in hospitals because of the fear of acquiring COVID-19. This fear caused a decrease in health service utilization during the pandemic. Aims: To compare paediatric forensic cases admitted to an emergency department before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We retrospectively compared the age, sex, type, frequency, and distribution of forensic cases admitted to the Paediatric Emergency Department of Umraniye Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Türkiye, before the COVID-19 pandemic between 1 July 2019 and 8 March 2020, and during the pandemic between 9 March and 31 December 2020. Results: There were 226 paediatric forensic cases among 147 624 emergency admissions before the COVID-19 pandemic, and 253 among 60 764 admissions during the pandemic. The proportion of forensic cases increased from 0.15% before the pandemic to 0.41% during the pandemic. Intoxication by accidental ingestion was the most common reason for forensic cases before and during the pandemic. There was a significant increase in ingestion of corrosive material during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. Conclusion: Parental anxiety and depression caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown resulted in decreased attention to childcare, leading to increased accidental ingestion of harmful materials among paediatric forensic cases admitted to the emergency department.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Betacoronavirus , Disease Outbreaks , Communicable Disease Control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
20.
Int. j. cardiovasc. sci. (Impr.) ; 35(1): 80-87, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2324592

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed measures of social distancing and, during this time, there has been an elevation in cardiovascular mortality rates and a decrease in the number of emergency visits. Objectives To assess and compare in-hospital mortality for cardiovascular diseases and emergency department visits during the COVID-19 pandemic and the same period in 2019. Methods Retrospective, single-center study that evaluated emergency visits and in-hospital deaths between March 16, 2020 and June 16, 2020, when the steepest fall in the number of emergency admissions for COVID-19 was registered. These data were compared with the emergency visits and in-hospital deaths between March 16 and June 16, 2019. We analyzed the total number of deaths, and cardiovascular deaths. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was a 35% decrease in the number of emergency visits and an increase in the ratio of the number of deaths to the number of emergency visits in 2020. The increase in the ratio of the number of all-cause deaths to the number of emergency visits was 45.6% and the increase in the ratio of the number of cardiovascular deaths to the number of emergency visits was 62.1%. None of the patients who died in the study period in 2020 tested positive for COVID-19. Conclusion In-hospital mortality for cardiovascular diseases increased proportionally to the number of emergency visits during the COVID-19-imposed social distancing compared with the same period in 2019. (Int J Cardiovasc Sci. 2020; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Emergency Service, Hospital , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization
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