Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 537
Filter
1.
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging ; 41(6): 480-487, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816542

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether isometric handgrip exercise, with or without blood flow restriction, would alter interference control and feelings. 60 healthy young adults completed three experimental visits, consisting of four sets of 2 min isometric handgrip exercise, at 30% of maximal strength with or without blood flow restriction (50% of arterial occlusion pressure), or a non-exercise/time-matched control. Exercise-induced feeling inventory and Stroop Color Word Test were performed at pre- and ~10-min post-exercise, respectively. Bayes factors (BF10 ) quantified the evidence for or against the null. There were no changes or differences between conditions for interference control following exercise with or without blood flow restriction (Incongruent BF10 : 0.155; Stroop Interference BF10 : 0.082). There were also no differences in the error rate as well as no differences between conditions for changes in 'positivity' or 'revitalization'. Feelings of 'tranquility' were reduced relative to a control following exercise with (median δ [95% credible interval]: -0.74 (-1.05, -0.45), BF10 : 5515.7) and without (median δ: -0.72 [-1.02, -0.41], BF10 : 571.3) blood flow restriction. These changes were not different between exercise conditions. Feelings of 'physical exhaustion' were increased relative to a control following exercise without blood flow restriction (median δ: 0.35[0.09, 0.61], BF10 : 5.84). However, this increase was not different from the same exercise with blood flow restriction. These results suggest that 1) isometric handgrip exercise could be performed without impairing interference control, even when blood flow restriction is added, and that 2) changes in feelings occur independent of changes in interference control.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Hand Strength , Bayes Theorem , Blood Pressure , Emotions , Hemodynamics , Humans , Young Adult
2.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(7)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785896

ABSTRACT

Neuroticism has recently received increased attention in the psychology field due to the finding of high implications of neuroticism on an individual's life and broader public health. This study aims to investigate the effect of a brief 6-week breathing-based mindfulness intervention (BMI) on undergraduate neurotic students' emotion regulation. We acquired data of their psychological states, physiological changes, and electroencephalogram (EEG), before and after BMI, in resting states and tasks. Through behavioral analysis, we found the students' anxiety and stress levels significantly reduced after BMI, with p-values of 0.013 and 0.027, respectively. Furthermore, a significant difference between students in emotion regulation strategy, that is, suppression, was also shown. The EEG analysis demonstrated significant differences between students before and after MI in resting states and tasks. Fp1 and O2 channels were identified as the most significant channels in evaluating the effect of BMI. The potential of these channels for classifying (single-channel-based) before and after BMI conditions during eyes-opened and eyes-closed baseline trials were displayed by a good performance in terms of accuracy (~77%), sensitivity (76-80%), specificity (73-77%), and area-under-the-curve (AUC) (0.66-0.8) obtained by k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms. Mindfulness can thus improve the self-regulation of the emotional state of neurotic students based on the psychometric and electrophysiological analyses conducted in this study.


Subject(s)
Emotional Regulation , Mindfulness , Brain , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Students/psychology
3.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 7(1): 33, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785175

ABSTRACT

Previous research has shown that face masks impair the ability to perceive social information and the readability of emotions. These studies mostly explored the effect of standard medical, often white, masks on emotion recognition. However, in reality, many individuals prefer masks with different styles. We investigated whether the appearance of the mask (pattern: angular vs. curvy and color: black vs. white) affected the recognition of emotional states. Participants were asked to identify the emotions on faces covered by masks with different designs. The presence of masks resulted in decreasing accuracy and confidence and increasing reaction times, indicating that masks impair emotion recognition. There were no significant effects of angularity versus curvature or color on emotion recognition, which suggests that mask design may not impair the recognition beyond the effect of mere mask wearing. Besides, we found relationships between individual difference variables such as mask wearing attitudes, mask design preferences, individual traits and emotion recognition. The majority of participants demonstrated positive attitudes toward mask wearing and preferred non-patterned black and white masks. Preferences for white masks were associated with better emotion recognition of masked faces. In contrast, those with negative attitudes toward masks showed marginally poorer performance in emotion recognition for masked faces, and preferred patterned more than plain masks, perhaps viewing masks as a fashion item rather than a necessity. Moreover, preferences to wear patterned masks were negatively related to actual wearing of masks indoors and perceived risks of COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Masks , Color , Emotions , Humans , Recognition, Psychology
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0264638, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779746

ABSTRACT

Young adults are currently the loneliest demographic in the UK and other Western countries, yet little is known about how they see the causes of their loneliness. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the subjective causes of loneliness among young adults (18-24 years old), particularly those of lower socio-economic status (SES) who are in employment, renting and living in the most deprived areas, since they are the loneliest in the UK. Utilising a free association technique and thematic analysis, and embedded in a phenomenological framework, the subjective causes of loneliness in a matched sample of 48 young adults in the four most deprived boroughs of London are found to cluster around five themes: The Feeling of Being Disconnected, Contemporary Culture, Pressure, Social Comparison and Transitions Between Life Stages. Disconnection arises from feeling one does not matter, is not understood or is unable to express oneself. Challenges pertaining to social media and materialism in contemporary culture contribute to loneliness as does pressure associated with work, fitting in and social comparison. Social media play a major role in exacerbating these experiences. Finally, transitions between life stages such as breakups, loss of significant others and transitory stages to do with education and employment are felt to cause loneliness. The findings suggest potential avenues for loneliness reduction.


Subject(s)
Loneliness , Social Class , Adolescent , Adult , Emotions , Employment , Humans , London , Young Adult
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 824744, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776023

ABSTRACT

State rumination, unlike trait rumination which is described as a persistent and stable response style, is usually triggered by a specific stressful event and causes negative emotions within a short period of time. The measurement methods of trait rumination, such as the ruminative response scale (RRS), are therefore not fully applicable to state rumination. Recently, researchers have developed the brief state rumination inventory (BSRI) to characterize state rumination, addressing the gap in the field of accurate measurement of state rumination. To develop such an effective tool in the Chinese context, we developed a Chinese version of the BSRI and tested its psychometric properties. Two studies were conducted to address the research goal. In Study 1, we recruited 512 subjects, each of whom completed the Chinese version of the BSRI, RRS, emotional regulation questionnaire (ERQ), depression-anxiety-stress scale (DASS), and positive and negative affect scale (PANAS). Results showed that the scores of the BSRI were positively correlated with all other scale scores (ps < 0.001), and the correlation with the RRS was the highest, indicating that the BSRI showed good convergent validity. Additionally, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Chinese version of the BSRI was 0.93. Study 2 aimed to examine the ecological validity of the Chinese version of the BSRI. We recruited another 54 subjects who were randomly divided into two groups, with 27 in the rumination induction group and 27 in the distraction group, and recorded the BSRI scores of the two groups before and after a specific experiment. We found there was a significant increase in BSRI scores after rumination induction (t = 3.91, p < 0.001), while there was no significant difference in the concrete distraction group before and after the experiment (t = 0.70, p = 0.48). In sum, the Chinese version of the BSRI showed good reliability and validity for assessing state rumination in the general Chinese population.


Subject(s)
Psychometrics , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thinking , China , Emotions , Humans , Reproducibility of Results
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e25243, 2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770879

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most of what is known regarding health information engagement on social media stems from quantitative methodologies. Public health literature often quantifies engagement by measuring likes, comments, and/or shares of posts within health organizations' Facebook pages. However, this content may not represent the health information (and misinformation) generally available to and consumed by platform users. Furthermore, some individuals may prefer to engage with information without leaving quantifiable digital traces. Mixed methods approaches may provide a way of surpassing the constraints of assessing engagement with health information by using only currently available social media metrics. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to discuss the limitations of current approaches in assessing health information engagement on Facebook and presents the social media content and context elicitation method, a qualitatively driven, mixed methods approach to understanding engagement with health information and how engagement may lead to subsequent actions. METHODS: Data collection, management, and analysis using the social media content and context elicitation method are presented. This method was developed for a broader study exploring how and why US Latinos and Latinas engage with cancer prevention and screening information on Facebook. The study included 20 participants aged between 40 and 75 years without cancer who participated in semistructured, in-depth interviews to discuss their Facebook use and engagement with cancer information on the platform. Participants accessed their Facebook account alongside the researcher, typed cancer in the search bar, and discussed cancer-related posts they engaged with during the previous 12 months. Engagement was defined as liking, commenting, and/or sharing a post; clicking on a post link; reading an article in a post; and/or watching a video within a post. Content engagement prompted questions regarding the reasons for engagement and whether engagement triggered further action. Data were managed using MAXQDA (VERBI GmbH) and analyzed using thematic and content analyses. RESULTS: Data emerging from the social media content and context elicitation method demonstrated that participants mainly engaged with cancer prevention and screening information by viewing and/or reading content (48/66, 73%) without liking, commenting, or sharing it. This method provided rich content regarding how US Latinos and Latinas engage with and act upon cancer prevention and screening information on Facebook. We present 2 emblematic cases from the main study to exemplify the additional information and context elicited from this methodology, which is currently lacking from quantitative approaches. CONCLUSIONS: The social media content and context elicitation method allows a better representation and deeper contextualization of how people engage with and act upon health information and misinformation encountered on social media. This method may be applied to future studies regarding how to best communicate health information on social media, including how these affect assessments of message credibility and accuracy, which can influence health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Adult , Aged , Communication , Emotions , Humans , Middle Aged , Public Health , Research Design
7.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 120(2): 106-110, 2022 04.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766099

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Changes in daily routine and social fabric resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic had an effect on children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to know the mood, emotions, and behaviors of children and adolescents during the COVID-19 lockdown. POPULATION AND METHODS: This was a prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study. Parents and/ or caregivers of children and adolescents aged 3-15 years in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires were asked about their perceptions of the mood, behaviors, and emotions of children and adolescents during the lockdown. RESULTS: A total of 1080 questionnaires were included. Results showed that 81% of parents and/or caregivers observed changes in children and adolescents emotional health; 76% referred that children aged 3-5 years were bored, angry, and upset. They also observed an increase in crying spells (52%) and regression to behaviors that had been outgrown (29%). In the 6-11-year-old group, 43% showed difficulty focusing. Adults noticed that 3 out of 10 adolescents aged 12-15 years discontinued activities they used to enjoy and were sad and worried. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted on the mood, behaviors, and emotions of children and adolescents. Negative feelings prevailed, such as boredom, sadness, anxiety, and worry.


Introducción. Los cambios en la rutina y en el entramado social que generó la pandemia por COVID-19 afectaron a los niños, niñas y adolescentes (NNyA). El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer el estado de ánimo, las emociones y las conductas de los NNyA durante el aislamiento por COVID-19. Población y métodos. Estudio prospectivo, descriptivo y transversal. Se preguntó a los padres y/o cuidadores de niños de 3 a 15 años de edad, de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, cómo percibían el estado de ánimo, las conductas y las emociones de los NNyA durante el período de aislamiento. Resultados. Se incluyeron 1080 cuestionarios. El 81 % de los padres y/o cuidadores advirtió algún cambio en la salud emocional de los NNyA. El 76 % refirió que los niños de 3-5 años se mostraban aburridos, enojados y angustiados. Además, observaron un aumento de los episodios de llanto (52 %) y regresión a comportamientos ya superados (29 %). En el grupo de 6-11 años, el 43 % presentó dificultad en mantener la concentración. En 3 de cada 10 adolescentes, de 12 a 15 años de edad, los adultos percibieron abandono de actividades que antes disfrutaban, preocupación y tristeza. Conclusión. La pandemia de COVID-19impactó en el estado de ánimo, las conductas y las emociones de los NNyA. Predominaron los sentimientos negativos, como aburrimiento, tristeza, angustia y preocupación.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 393, 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly influenced the routine of healthcare workers. This study investigated the impact of the pandemic on dental practice and dentists' feelings in Latin America. METHODS: A survey was conducted with dentists from 11 Spanish-speaking Latin American countries in September-December 2020. Professionals were invited by email and via an open campaign promoted on social media. The questions investigated dental care routines, practice changes, and feelings about the pandemic. Descriptive statistics were used to identify frequencies and distributions of variables. Proportions were compared using chi-square tests. RESULTS: A total of 2127 responses were collected from a sample with diverse demographic, sex, work, and education characteristics. The impact of COVID-19 was considered high/very high by 60% of respondents. The volume of patients assisted weekly was lower compared with the pre-pandemic period (mean reduction = 14 ± 15 patients). A high rate of fear to contracting the COVID-19 at work was observed (85%); 4.9% of participants had a positive COVID-19 test. The main professional challenges faced by respondents were reduction in the number of patients or financial gain (35%), fear of contracting COVID-19 (34%), and burden with or difficulty in purchasing new personal protective equipment (22%). The fear to contracting COVID-19 was influenced by the number of weekly appointments. A positive test by the dentists was associated with their reports of having assisted COVID-19 patients. The most cited feelings about the pandemic were uncertainty, fear, worry, anxiety, and stress. Negative feelings were more prevalent for professionals who did not receive training for COVID-19 preventive measures and those reporting higher levels of fear to contract the disease. CONCLUSION: This multi-country survey indicated a high impact of the pandemic on dental care routines in Latin America. A massive prevalence of bad feelings was associated with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dentists , Emotions , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21912, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758315

ABSTRACT

The ongoing novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in the enforcement of national public health safety measures including precautionary behaviours such as border closures, movement restrictions, total or partial lockdowns, social distancing, and face mask mandates in order to reduce the spread of this disease. The current study uses affective priming, an indirect behavioural measure of implicit attitude, to evaluate COVID-19 attitudes. Explicitly, participants rated their overall risk perception associated with contracting COVID-19 significantly lower compared to their perception of necessary precautions and overall adherence to public health measures. During baseline trials, participants explicitly rated COVID-19 affiliated words as unpleasant, similar to traditional unpleasant word stimuli. Despite rating the COVID-19 affiliated words as unpleasant, affective priming was not observed for congruent prime-target COVID-19 affiliated word pairs when compared to congruent prime-target pleasant and unpleasant words. Overall, these results provide quantitative evidence that COVID-19 affiliated words do not invoke the same implicit attitude response as traditional pleasant and unpleasant word stimuli, despite conscious explicit rating of the COVID-19 words as unpleasant. This reduction in unpleasant attitude towards COVID-19 related words may contribute towards decreased fear-related behaviours and increased incidences of risky-behaviour facilitating the movement of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Emotions , Humans , Male , Young Adult
10.
J Community Health ; 47(1): 163-167, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748459

ABSTRACT

Current day youth have an important role in climate activism, as the decisions and policies made now will have long lasting impacts on the climate and sustainability. Climate change is becoming an increasing concern for younger generations. As such, the purpose of this study was to describe content related to climate change on TikTok. This study included 100 English-language videos related to climate change featured on TikTok. The hashtag #climatechange was chosen because it had the most views of any related hashtag at the time of the study. The number of views, comments, and likes were recorded for each video. Each video was also observed for the presence of predetermined content characteristics. The 100 videos sampled collectively received 205,551,200 views, 40, 203,400 likes, and 666,089 comments. Only eight of the 100 videos included information from a reputable source. Only three of the characteristics were featured in a majority (> 50) of the videos. These were, presents climate change as real (93), affected populations (76), and climate anxiety/frustration (57). Videos mentioning natural disasters garnered 63,453,100 (30.87%) views, 14,245,200 (35.43%) likes, and 236,493 (35.50%) comments. In all, 73 of the 100 videos mentioned at least one environmental impact. Videos including this theme earned 156,677,200 (76.22%) views, 32,000,700 (79.60%) likes, and 563,195 (84.55%) comments. Social media platforms such as TikTok are important tools for understanding popular opinion regarding public health issues such as global climate change. However, the presence of credible professionals is essential on platforms such as TikTok to increase the chances that messaging is as comprehensive as time allows, while also being scientifically sound.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Adolescent , Climate Change , Emotions , Humans , Public Health , Video Recording
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742464

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, restrictive measures (e.g., prohibiting physical visits and group activities) were introduced in nursing homes to protect older residents. Although the importance of social contacts and social activities to fulfill social needs and avoid loneliness is known, these were challenged during the pandemic. This qualitative study specifically focused on how residents, close relatives, and volunteers in nursing homes experienced the restrictive measures in retrospect and gained insights into the impact of the restrictive measures on social needs and loneliness, and the lessons that could be learned. Thirty semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with residents and close relatives, and one online focus group with ten volunteers, were conducted. Recruitment took place at psychogeriatric and somatic units in the Northern, Eastern and Southern regions of the Netherlands and Flanders, Belgium. The interviews and focus group were transcribed verbatim, and an open, inductive approach was used for analysis. Alternative ways of social contact could not fully compensate for physical visits. Generally, participants reported that it was a difficult time, indicated by feelings of loneliness, fear, sadness, and powerlessness. A great diversity in loneliness was reported. The most important reasons for feeling lonely were missing close social contacts and social activities. The diversity in the impact of restrictive measures depended on, e.g., social needs, coping strategies, and character. Restrictive COVID-19 measures in nursing homes resulted in negative emotions and unmet social needs of residents, close relatives, and volunteers. During future outbreaks of the COVID-19 virus or another virus or bacterium, for which restrictive measures may be needed, nursing homes should actively involve residents, close relatives, and volunteers to balance safety, self-determination, and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Nursing Homes , Volunteers
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742449

ABSTRACT

Background: Differing expressions of the fear of COVID-19 between men and women can potentially increase both immediate and long-term physical health risks. We predicted that women students would express greater fear of COVID-19. Methods: We used an Internet-delivered Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) to assess fear among men (n = 100) and women (n = 272) from a larger population of academic medical center members (n = 1761). Sex differences in emotional and physical symptoms were assessed as subcategories within fear scores. Results: Women reported greater fear of COVID-19 than men (p < 0.001). Women reported greater emotional fear (p < 0.001) on specific scale items (thinking of COVID-19, watching news stories about COVID-19, and losing sleep due to fear of contracting COVID-19). Discussion/Conclusions: These results provide a better understanding of how fear of COVID-19 can differ based on sex and how that fear may be expressed differently through emotional and physical symptoms. This information will inform academic health centers of COVID-19 prevention and management policies that may include a gender-specific focus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Sex Characteristics
13.
Perspect Public Health ; 142(2): 102-116, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741878

ABSTRACT

AIMS: (1) To catalogue and map all singing for health and wellbeing groups in the Republic of Ireland (ROI); (2) determine how they prioritise health outcomes; (3) understand what they consider success; and (4) identify gaps in provision. METHODS: A novel mixed-methods survey was distributed electronically through SING Ireland (the Choir Association of Ireland), artsandhealth.ie, and to 2736 potential stakeholders with links to singing for health and wellbeing and singing on social prescription (SSP) from October 2020 to April 2021. Thematic analysis was used to analyse four open-ended survey questions. RESULTS: A total of 185 singing for health and wellbeing groups were identified, with varied representation in each of the ROI's 26 counties. 35 groups were noted to have links to SSP. Gaps in provision for clinical and individual populations and for SSP were identified. Six themes related to the success of group singing for health and wellbeing programmes were determined: fostering and funding social and community connections; the people and the approach; enjoyment and atmosphere; musical and personal growth, programmatic structure and musical content; and the impact of Covid. CONCLUSION: The first-ever national mapping of group singing for health and wellbeing in the ROI, and one of few internationally, this study may serve as a roadmap for gathering information about existing singing for health and wellbeing provision and identifying geographical and clinical gaps internationally. Recommendations are included for future research to address gaps in provision, explore the feasibility of integrating SSP more widely and for further public health investment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Group Processes , Health Status , Singing , Emotions , Humans , Ireland , Public Health
14.
J Healthc Eng ; 2022: 8412430, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741727

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a WHO-declared public health emergency of worldwide concern, is quickly spreading over the world, posing a physical and mental health hazard. The COVID-19 has resulted in one of the world's most significant worldwide lockdowns, affecting human mental health. In this research work, a modified Long Short-Term Memory (MLSTM)-based Deep Learning model framework is proposed for analyzing COVID-19 effect on emotion and mental health during the pandemic using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The participants of this study were volunteers that recovered from COVID-19. The EEG dataset of 40 people is collected to predict emotion and mental health. The results of the MLSTM model are also compared with the other literature classifiers. With an accuracy of 91.26%, the MLSTM beats existing classifiers when using the 70-30 partitioning technique.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Communicable Disease Control , Electroencephalography/methods , Emotions , Humans , Pandemics
15.
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736924

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recognizing the under-examined socio-cognitive mindfulness and achievement emotions in nursing, this study aimed to examine the relationships between grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions among nursing students, as well as the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness. METHODS: This study utilized a cross-sectional design. A total of 220 nursing students in Korea completed the questionnaire measuring the levels of grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions. To analyze data, structural equation modeling and path analysis were performed. RESULTS: Grit was positively related to socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive achievement emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. Socio-cognitive mindfulness was positively related to positive emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. In addition, the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness were found in the association between grit and achievement emotions in nursing students. CONCLUSIONS: Grittier students tend to have higher socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive emotions but lower negative emotions in learning environments. Mediating effects highlight the benefits of socio-cognitive mindfulness in the context of nursing education, providing the basis for developing practical mindfulness programs to cultivate nursing students' socio-cognitive mindfulness.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Students, Nursing , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264994, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736518

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 severely impacted world health and, as a consequence of the measures implemented to stop the spread of the virus, also irreversibly damaged the world economy. Research shows that receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is the most successful measure to combat the virus and could also address its indirect consequences. However, vaccine hesitancy is growing worldwide and the WHO names this hesitancy as one of the top ten threats to global health. This study investigates the trend in positive attitudes towards vaccines across ten countries since a positive attitude is important. Furthermore, we investigate those variables related to having a positive attitude, as these factors could potentially increase the uptake of vaccines. We derive our text corpus from vaccine-related tweets, harvested in real-time from Twitter. Using Natural Language Processing (NLP), we derive the sentiment and emotions contained in the tweets to construct daily time-series data. We analyse a panel dataset spanning both the Northern and Southern hemispheres from 1 February 2021 to 31 July 2021. To determine the relationship between several variables and the positive sentiment (attitude) towards vaccines, we run various models, including POLS, Panel Fixed Effects and Instrumental Variables estimations. Our results show that more information about vaccines' safety and the expected side effects are needed to increase positive attitudes towards vaccines. Additionally, government procurement and the vaccine rollout should improve. Accessibility to the vaccine should be a priority, and a collective effort should be made to increase positive messaging about the vaccine, especially on social media. The results of this study contribute to the understanding of the emotional challenges associated with vaccine uptake and inform policymakers, health workers, and stakeholders who communicate to the public during infectious disease outbreaks. Additionally, the global fight against COVID-19 might be lost if the attitude towards vaccines is not improved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Emotions , Global Health , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Natural Language Processing , Optimism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Media , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/trends , /trends , Vaccines
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 191, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 social restrictions have increased the risk for depression compared to the previous period in Italian women with Low-Risk Pregnancy (LRP). lLess is known about the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on High-Risk Pregnancy (HRP). This study aimed: 1) to explore levels of depression in women who become pregnant before and during COVID-19 pandemic, distinguishing between LRP and HRP; 2) to analyze the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on pregnancy experience in LRP and HRP. METHODS: A before-during COVID-19 pandemic cross-sectional study was carried out on 155 pregnant women (Mean age = 34.18), between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation. 77 women were recruited before COVID-19 pandemic (51.9% LRP; 48.1% HRP) and 78 women were recruited during COVID-19 pandemic (51.3% LRP; 48.7% HRP). HRP group was enrolled during hospitalization for high-risk pregnancy. Participants filled out Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Moreover, only COVID-19 group answered an open-ended question about the impact of restriction on pregnancy experience. RESULTS: HRP women reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than LRP. No difference emerged for COVID (before/during) but an interaction effect between COVID-19 and obstetric condition was found. The qualitative results showed the impact of restrictions on emotions and concerns. CONCLUSION: Respect to the previous period, LRP women during COVID-19 presented an increased risk for depressive symptoms than HRP. The HRP women during COVID-19 seemed to use hospitalization as a resource to find a social support network with other pregnant women and to be reassured on the clinical ongoing of pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Pregnancy, High-Risk/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Middle Aged , Pregnancy/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quality of Health Care , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Span J Psychol ; 25: e12, 2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735179

ABSTRACT

For constructionism, language is the link among different levels of analysis of emotional events, from individual to interpersonal and macrosocial. The interaction among these emotional levels allows us to construe an emotional episode and label it with an emotion word, coordinate with the emotions perceived in others, and represent events as a society. Across two studies, we found similarities and differences among inner emotions experienced (individual level), emotions perceived in others (descriptive feeling rules, interpersonal level) and emotions shared on the internet (socioemotional conventions, macrosocial level), with all these emotional targets focused on the COVID-19 outbreak. The results indicate a similarity between the emotional meaning of COVID-19 in society and the descriptive feeling rules, whereas the reported inner emotions were clearly distinct: Joy was irrelevant at the interpersonal and macrosocial levels but clearly important at the individual level. A mismatch also appeared for fear and hope. While fear was the most predominant emotion at the interpersonal and macrosocial levels during most of the phases, it was moderately predominant at the individual level. Hope followed the opposite pattern, being the most relevant emotion at the individual level but less relevant at the interpersonal and macrosocial levels. Each level might have different consequences: Mixed emotions at the individual level might promote resilience; fear perceived in other people might motivate protective behaviors; and sadness socially shared during Christmas might generate greater empathy. These results support the complexity of emotional concepts and the suitability of exploring them at different levels of analysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Emotions , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732057

ABSTRACT

With social networking enabling the expressions of billions of people to be posted online, sentiment analysis and massive computational power enables systematic mining of information about populations including their affective states with respect to epidemiological concerns during a pandemic. Gleaning rationale for behavioral choices, such as vaccine hesitancy, from public commentary expressed through social media channels may provide quantifiable and articulated sources of feedback that are useful for rapidly modifying or refining pandemic spread predictions, health protocols, vaccination offerings, and policy approaches. Additional potential gains of sentiment analysis may include lessening of vaccine hesitancy, reduction in civil disobedience, and most importantly, better healthcare outcomes for individuals and their communities. In this article, we highlight the evolution of select epidemiological models; conduct a critical review of models in terms of the level and depth of modeling of social media, social network factors, and sentiment analysis; and finally, partially illustrate sentiment analysis using COVID-19 Twitter data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Humans , Vaccination/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL