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1.
Patient Educ Couns ; 105(7): 2436-2442, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150396

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Healthy individuals from hereditary cancer families undergoing genetic testing for cancer susceptibility (GTC) report more distress when they perceive their social support as low and suppress their emotions. This study aimed to explore how suppressing emotions and perceiving others as unsupportive are related with cancer-risk distress. METHODS: We performed a regression-based mediation analysis to assess if expressive suppression mediates or is mediated by perceived social support in the relation with cancer-risk distress. Participants were 125 healthy adults aged over 18 (M = 36.07, SD = 12.86), mostly female (72,4%), who undergone GTC to assess the presence of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer or Lynch syndromes. RESULTS: Controlling for age and gender, we found a moderate size indirect effect of social support on cancer-risk distress through expressive suppression (ß = -0.095) and a direct effect of expressive suppression on cancer-risk distress. CONCLUSIONS: When healthy individuals from hereditary cancer families perceive their social network as less responsive, they tend to not express their emotions, which relates to increased distress facing GTC. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Practitioners may assess cancer-risk related distress before the GTC and offer distressed individuals interventions focused on changing emotion regulation strategies in a safe group context.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Neoplasms , Adult , Emotions/physiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/genetics , Social Support
2.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277366, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140642

ABSTRACT

Processing information in a learned foreign language can alter one's judgment or cognitive evaluation of stimuli. Documented consequences include a reduction in perceived negativity and perceived severity of crime or diseases. The global COVID-19 pandemic has offered a unique opportunity to investigate this phenomenon in a real-life public health communication context. The aim of this study is to investigate how foreign language processing influences people's reaction towards freedom-restrictive messages. In our experimental study (N = 605), we presented participants with pandemic mitigation instructions in their native language versus a learned foreign language and assessed their perceived sense of control, cognitive evaluation of the instructions, and the intention to adhere to them. The results indicated that the use of a foreign language influenced people's perceived sense of control in a way that might intuitively be surprising: foreign language enhanced sense of control. This positively influenced the cognitive evaluation of the instructions' effectiveness and the intention to comply with them. The present research demonstrates that foreign language processing influences individuals' responses to specific, real-life instructions. Our results provide important contributions to the literature on foreign language effects and public communication and enable practitioners to more accurately predict recipient responses to global crisis communications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Language , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Internal-External Control , Emotions/physiology
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19884, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133607

ABSTRACT

Bodily sensations are one of the major building blocks of emotional experience. However, people differ in their ability to recognise and name their emotions, especially those in response to complex phenomena such as climate change or the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, we investigated whether the bodily sensation maps (BSMs) approach can be employed to study emotions related to phenomena that are likely to evoke various, and perhaps even conflicting, emotions in people. Using a unique topographical self-report method-the previously established emBODY tool, 548 participants marked where in the body they feel sensations (activations and deactivations) when they experience distinct emotions (e.g. happiness) and when they think about different phenomena, namely climate change, COVID-19 pandemic, war, nature, friends, and summer holidays. We revealed maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions and phenomena. Importantly, each phenomenon was related to a statistically unique BSM, suggesting that participants were able to differentiate between feelings associated with distinct phenomena. Yet, we also found that BSMs of phenomena showed some similarity with maps of emotions. Together, these findings indicate that the emBODY tool might be useful in uncovering the range of emotions individuals experience towards complex phenomena.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Emotions/physiology , Sensation/physiology , Happiness
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1020850, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119552

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to the introduction of a range of infection prevention and control (IPC) measures that resulted in dramatic changes in people's lives however these IPC measures are not practiced consistently across the population. One predictor of an individual's responses to the pandemic is disgust sensitivity. Understanding how disgust sensitivity varies within the population could help to inform design of public health messages to promote more uniform behavioral change during future pandemics. To understand the effect of the current COVID-19 pandemic on an individual's pathogen disgust sensitivity we have compared pathogen disgust sensitivity during the current COVID-19 pandemic to baseline pathogen disgust sensitivity, determined prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in the same sample of UK adults. We find that the COVID-19 pandemic did not alter overall pathogen disgust sensitivity suggesting that disgust sensitivity is stable despite IPC measures, public health messaging, media coverage and other factors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disgust , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 7(1): 83, 2022 09 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109074

ABSTRACT

Face masks are now worn frequently to reduce the spreading of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Their health benefits are undisputable, but covering the lower half of one's face also makes it harder for others to recognize facial expressions of emotions. Three experiments were conducted to determine how strongly the recognition of different facial expressions is impaired by masks, and which emotions are confused with each other. In each experiment, participants had to recognize facial expressions of happiness, sadness, anger, surprise, fear, and disgust, as well as a neutral expression, displayed by male and female actors of the Radboud Faces Database. On half of the 168 trials, the lower part of the face was covered by a face mask. In all experiments, facial emotion recognition (FER) was about 20% worse for masked faces than for unmasked ones (68% correct vs. 88%). The impairment was largest for disgust, followed by fear, surprise, sadness, and happiness. It was not significant for anger and the neutral expression. As predicted, participants frequently confused emotions that share activation of the visible muscles in the upper half of the face. In addition, they displayed response biases in these confusions: They frequently misinterpreted disgust as anger, fear as surprise, and sadness as neutral, whereas the opposite confusions were less frequent. We conclude that face masks do indeed cause a marked impairment of FER and that a person perceived as angry, surprised, or neutral may actually be disgusted, fearful, or sad, respectively. This may lead to misunderstandings, confusions, and inadequate reactions by the perceivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Recognition , Confusion , Emotions/physiology , Facial Expression , Female , Humans , Male , Masks , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18619, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106471

ABSTRACT

Prior laboratory research has suggested that humans may become more prosocial in stressful or threatening situations, but it is unknown whether the link between prosociality and defense generalizes to real-life. Here, we examined the association between defensive responses to a real-world threat (the COVID-19 pandemic) and everyday altruism. Four independent samples of 150 (N = 600) US residents were recruited online at 4 different timepoints, and self-report measures of perceived COVID-19 threat, defensive emotions (e.g., stress and anxiety), and everyday altruism were collected. Our operationalization of defensive emotions was inspired by the threat imminence framework, an ecological model of how humans and animals respond to varying levels of threat. We found that perceived COVID-19 threat was associated with higher levels of everyday altruism (assessed by the Self-report Altruism scale). Importantly, there was a robust association between experiencing acute anxiety and high physiological arousal during the pandemic (responses typically characteristic of higher perceived threat imminence), and propensity to engage in everyday altruism. Non-significant or negative associations were found with less acute defensive responses like stress. These findings support a real-life relation between defensive and altruistic motivation in humans, which may be modulated by perceived threat imminence.


Subject(s)
Altruism , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Emotions/physiology
7.
Behav Res Methods ; 54(5): 2445-2456, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080556

ABSTRACT

The topic of affective development over the lifespan is at the forefront of psychological science. One of the intriguing findings in this area is superior emotion regulation and increased positivity in older rather than younger adults. This paper aims to contribute to the empirical base of studies on the role of affect in cognition. We report a new dataset of valence (positivity) ratings to 3,600 English words collected from North American and British English-speaking younger (below 65 years of age) and older adults (65 years of age and older) during the COVID-19 pandemic. This dataset represents a broad range of valence and a rich selection of semantic categories. Our analyses of the new data pitted against comparable pre-pandemic (2013) data from younger counterparts reveal differences in the overall distribution of valence related both to age and the psychological fallout of the pandemic. Thus, we found at the group level that older participants produced higher valence ratings overall than their younger counterparts before and especially during the pandemic. Moreover, valence ratings saw a super-linear increase after the age of 65. Together, these findings provide new evidence for emotion regulation throughout adulthood, including a novel demonstration of greater emotional resilience in older adults to the stressors of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Aged , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Semantics , Cognition
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071461

ABSTRACT

Emotional responses are significant for understanding public perceptions of urban green space (UGS) and can be used to inform proposals for optimal urban design strategies to enhance public emotional health in the times of COVID-19. However, most empirical studies fail to consider emotion-oriented landscape assessments under dynamic perspectives despite the fact that individually observed sceneries alter with angle. To close this gap, a real-time sentimental-based landscape assessment framework is developed, integrating facial expression recognition with semantic segmentation of changing landscapes. Furthermore, a case study using panoramic videos converted from Google Street View images to simulate changing scenes was used to test the viability of this framework, resulting in five million big data points. The result of this study shows that through the collaboration of deep learning algorithms, finer visual variables were classified, subtle emotional responses were tracked, and better regression results for valence and arousal were obtained. Among all the predictors, the proportion of grass was the most significant predictor for emotional perception. The proposed framework is adaptable and human-centric, and it enables the instantaneous emotional perception of the built environment by the general public as a feedback survey tool to aid urban planners in creating UGS that promote emotional well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Facial Recognition , Humans , Semantics , Emotions/physiology
9.
Psychiatry Res ; 317: 114863, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042097

ABSTRACT

Existing research proposed that moving from a disorder-level analysis to a symptom-level analysis may provide a more fine-grained understanding of psychopathology. This study aimed to explore the relations between two dimensions (i.e., cognitive reappraisal, CR; expressive suppression, ES) of emotion regulation and individual symptoms of depression and anxiety among medical staff during the late stage of COVID-19 pandemic. We examined depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and emotion regulation among 420 medical staff during the late stage of COVID-19 pandemic via network analysis. Two networks (i.e. emotion regulation-depression network and emotion regulation-anxiety network) were constructed in the present study. Bridge centrality index was calculated for each variable within the two networks. Among the present sample, the prevalences of depression and anxiety are 39.5% and 26.0%. CR and ES showed distinct connections to symptoms of depression and anxiety. Results of bridge centrality showed that in both networks, CR had a negative bridge expected influence value while ES had a positive bridge expected influence value. The results revealed the specific role of CR and ES in relation to depression and anxiety at a symptom level. Implications for clinical preventions and interventions are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Humans , Depression/psychology , Pandemics , Emotions/physiology , Anxiety/psychology , Medical Staff
10.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0274247, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039410

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused negative emotional responses in patients, with significant mental health consequences for the infected population. The need for an in-depth analysis of the emotional state of COVID-19 patients is imperative. This study employed semi-structured interviews and the text mining method to investigate features in lived experience narratives of COVID-19 patients and healthy controls with respect to five basic emotions. The aim was to identify differences in emotional status between the two matched groups of participants. The results indicate generally higher complexity and more expressive emotional language in healthy controls than in COVID-19 patients. Specifically, narratives of fear, happiness, and sadness by COVID-19 patients were significantly shorter as compared to healthy controls. Regarding lexical features, COVID-19 patients used more emotional words, in particular words of fear, disgust, and happiness, as opposed to those used by healthy controls. Emotional disorder symptoms of COVID-19 patients at the lexical level tended to focus on the emotions of fear and disgust. They narrated more in relation to self or family while healthy controls mainly talked about others. Our automatic emotional discourse analysis potentially distinguishes clinical status of COVID-19 patients versus healthy controls, and can thus be used to predict mental health disorder symptoms in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Data Mining , Emotions/physiology , Happiness , Humans
11.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 25(9): 561-570, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2028987

ABSTRACT

This study aims to unveil how COVID-19 affected the experience of stress by focusing on the stressors. Using computational analysis based on a newly developed stressor identification model, we compared the experience of stress expressed by Korean Twitter users before and during the pandemic in terms of (1) the stressors as the source of stress and (2) emotion as the manifestation of stress. Both tweet-level (N = 202,556) and user-level (N = 24,803) analyses revealed that social factors are prevalent sources of stress both before and during the pandemic. Moreover, social stressors increased the most during the pandemic. While stress from social stressors was manifested mainly as sadness before the pandemic, anger became the predominant emotional manifestation during the pandemic. Public health policies and educators should consider social stressors as the predominant source of stress during the pandemic and seek ways to prepare the public better for such threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anger , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/psychology
12.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(15)2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994137

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a new physiological signal acquisition multi-sensory platform for emotion detection: Multi-sensor Wearable Headband (MsWH). The system is capable of recording and analyzing five different physiological signals: skin temperature, blood oxygen saturation, heart rate (and its variation), movement/position of the user (more specifically of his/her head) and electrodermal activity/bioimpedance. The measurement system is complemented by a porthole camera positioned in such a way that the viewing area remains constant. Thus, the user's face will remain centered regardless of its position and movement, increasing the accuracy of facial expression recognition algorithms. This work specifies the technical characteristics of the developed device, paying special attention to both the hardware used (sensors, conditioning, microprocessors, connections) and the software, which is optimized for accurate and massive data acquisition. Although the information can be partially processed inside the device itself, the system is capable of sending information via Wi-Fi, with a very high data transfer rate, in case external processing is required. The most important features of the developed platform have been compared with those of a proven wearable device, namely the Empatica E4 wristband, in those measurements in which this is possible.


Subject(s)
Facial Recognition , Wearable Electronic Devices , Algorithms , Emotions/physiology , Female , Heart Rate/physiology , Humans , Male
13.
Risk Anal ; 42(1): 69-84, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961880

ABSTRACT

We propose a Pandemic Risk Perception Scale. Our scale comprises two constructs, Dread Risk and Personal Exposure, divided into five dimensions: Infection Risk, Emotional Health Risk, Health System Risk,Financial Risk, and Alimentary Risk. Using multidimensional item response theory, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling on two samples of respondents, our results show that Alimentary Risk, Health System Risk, and Emotional Health Risk are the main dimensions of risk perception for the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, Infection Risk has a minor impact on the pandemic's risk perception, suggesting the presence of different dynamics between personal and general risk perceptions for the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Pandemics , Perception , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/psychology , Humans
14.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271206, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951550

ABSTRACT

Disgust is an aversive reaction protecting an organism from disease. People differ in how prone they are to experiencing it, and this fluctuates depending on how safe the environment is. Previous research has shown that the recognition and processing of disgusting words depends not on the word's disgust per se but rather on individual sensitivity to disgust. However, the influence of dynamically changing disgust on language comprehension has not yet been researched. In a series of studies, we investigated whether the media's portrayal of COVID-19 will affect subsequent language processing via changes in disgust. The participants were exposed to news headlines either depicting COVID-19 as a threat or downplaying it, and then rated single words for disgust and valence (Experiment 1; N = 83) or made a lexical decision (Experiment 2; N = 86). The headline type affected only word ratings and not lexical decisions, but political ideology and disgust proneness affected both. More liberal participants assigned higher disgust ratings after the headlines discounted the threat of COVID-19, whereas more conservative participants did so after the headlines emphasized it. We explain the results through the politicization and polarization of the pandemic. Further, political ideology was more predictive of reaction times in Experiment 2 than disgust proneness. High conservatism correlated with longer reaction times for disgusting and negative words, and the opposite was true for low conservatism. The results suggest that disgust proneness and political ideology dynamically interact with perceived environmental safety and have a measurable effect on language processing. Importantly, they also suggest that the media's stance on the pandemic and the political framing of the issue may affect the public response by increasing or decreasing our disgust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disgust , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Language , Pandemics , Politics
15.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 12424, 2022 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1947494

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has led significant social repercussions and forced people to wear face masks. Recent research has demonstrated that the human ability to infer emotions from facial configurations is significantly reduced when face masks are worn. Since the mouth region is specifically crucial for deaf people who speak sign language, the current study assessed the impact of face masks on inferring emotional facial expressions in a population of adult deaf signers. A group of 34 congenitally deaf individuals and 34 normal-hearing individuals were asked to identify happiness, sadness, fear, anger, and neutral expression on static human pictures with and without facial masks presented through smartphones. For each emotion, the percentage of correct responses with and without face masks was calculated and compared between groups. Results indicated that face masks, such as those worn due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, limit the ability of people to infer emotions from facial expressions. The negative impact of face masks is significantly pronounced when deaf people have to recognize low-intensity expressions of happiness. These findings are of essential importance because difficulties in recognizing emotions from facial expressions due to mask wearing may contribute to the communication challenges experienced by the deaf community during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, generating feelings of frustration and exclusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Masks , Adult , Emotions/physiology , Facial Expression , Humans , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Neuropsychologia ; 174: 108334, 2022 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937048

ABSTRACT

In the last two years, face-to-face interactions have drastically changed worldwide, because of the COVID-19 pandemic: the persistent use of masks has had the advantage of reducing viral transmission, but it has also had the cost of impacting on the perception and recognition of social information from faces, especially emotions. To assess the cerebral counterpart to this condition, we carried out an EEG experiment, extracting Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional faces with and without surgical masks. Besides the expected impairment in emotion recognition in both accuracy and response times, also the classical face-related ERPs (N170 and P2) are altered by the presence of surgical masks. Importantly, the effect is stronger in individuals with a lower daily exposure to masks, suggesting that the brain must adapt to an extra constraint in decoding social input, due to masks hiding crucial facial information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facial Recognition , Electroencephalography , Emotions/physiology , Evoked Potentials/physiology , Facial Expression , Facial Recognition/physiology , Humans , Pandemics
17.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 670, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus currently cause a lot of pressure on the health system. Accordingly, many changes occurred in the way of providing health care, including pregnancy and childbirth care. To our knowledge, no studies on experiences of maternity care Providers during the COVID-19 Pandemic have been published in Iran. We aimed to discover their experiences on pregnancy and childbirth care during the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This study was a qualitative research performed with a descriptive phenomenological approach. The used sampling method was purposive sampling by taking the maximum variation possible into account, which continued until data saturation. Accordingly, in-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted by including 12 participants, as 4 gynecologists, 6 midwives working in the hospitals and private offices, and 2 midwives working in the health centers. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven stage method with MAXQDA10 software. RESULTS: Data analysis led to the extraction of 3 themes, 9 categories, and 25 subcategories. The themes were as follows: "Fear of Disease", "Burnout", and "Lessons Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic", respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal health care providers experience emotional and psychological stress and work challenges during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, comprehensive support should be provided for the protection of their physical and mental health statuses. By working as a team, utilizing the capacity of telemedicine to care and follow up mothers, and providing maternity care at home, some emerged challenges to maternal care services can be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Iran/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services/trends , Middle Aged , Midwifery/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
18.
Depress Anxiety ; 39(6): 515-523, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858585

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stressful events, such as those imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, are associated with depression risk, raising questions about processes that make some people more susceptible to the effects of stress on mental health than others. Emotion regulation may be a key process, but methods for objectively measuring emotion regulation abilities in youth are limited. We leveraged event-related potential (ERP) measures and a longitudinal study of adolescents oversampled for depression and depression risk to examine emotion regulation difficulties as prospective predictors of depressive symptoms in response to pandemic-related stress. METHODS: Before the pandemic, adolescents with (n = 28) and without (n = 34) clinical depression (N = 62 total) completed an explicit emotion regulation task while ERP data were recorded and measures of depressive symptoms. Adolescents were re-contacted during the pandemic to report on COVID-19 related stressful events and depressive symptoms (n = 48). RESULTS: Adolescents who had never experienced a depressive episode showed an increase in depressive symptoms during the pandemic, but adolescents who were clinically depressed before the pandemic did not exhibit significant changes in symptoms. Neural markers of emotion regulation abilities interacted with pandemic-related stressful events to predict depressive symptoms during the pandemic, such that stressors predicted increases in depressive symptoms only for adolescents with greater difficulty modulating responses to negative images before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results provide insight into adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic and highlight the role of emotion regulatory brain function in risk and resilience for depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Adolescent , Depression/psychology , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855600

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disturbs mental health. Indeed, higher levels of negative emotions and anxiety, along with lower levels of positive emotions and well-being, have been highlighted. As a result, individuals need to regulate these psychological states in a context of uncertainty and daily restrictions (e.g., access to leisure activities, social contacts) or modifications of livelihood (e.g., working modalities). Overall, psychological reactions to the pandemic have been shown to differ based on one's age. The purpose of this research is to compare psychological reactions to the pandemic between Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996) and Older Adults. The generation's prism seems relevant as members of specific generations are shaped (e.g., views of the world, the future) by their similar experiences. Ninety-four Millennials and 129 Older Adults, recruited in the general population, participated to an online survey assessing emotions, emotion regulation strategies, environmental satisfaction, and intolerance of uncertainty. Results show that Millennials experience higher levels of negative emotions along with higher levels of worry and rumination than Older Adults. Millennials also report a higher level of joy. Nonetheless, more Older Adults engage themselves in novel activities. Overall, findings confirm previous ones and indicate the need to offer effective clinicals tool to prevent mental health worsening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847290

ABSTRACT

Objective: to evaluate the factors associated with emotion regulation in men with internet access living in Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: an epidemiological survey, conducted with 1015 men. An electronic form was applied containing sociodemographic and occupational characteristics, support and coping strategies, as well as emotional and behavioral aspects. Emotion regulation was assessed using the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Results: The prevalence values observed were 44.6% for Low Cognitive Reappraisal and of 47.1% for High Emotional Suppression. The following factors were identified as associated: (a) with Low Cognitive Reappraisal: being aged 30 years old or more, practicing physical activity, worrying about social distancing and having positive emotions and feelings; and (b) with High Emotional Suppression: being heterosexual, non-white race/skin color, having security support or public administration, not sanitizing food, worrying about lack of physical activity and not having negative emotions. Conclusion: the adoption of emotion regulation strategies was associated with individual, contextual and emotional/behavioral characteristics. Masculinity ideals seem to exert an influence on these relationships.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Pandemics
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