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1.
Saúde Soc ; 30(4): e191008, 2021.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1817557

ABSTRACT

Resumen En América Latina, el 15% de las mujeres son trabajadoras domésticas remuneradas. Esta ocupación se realiza casi en el 80% de los casos bajo la informalidad, por lo que se trata de una ocupación sin protección social ni derechos laborales. A su vez, la salud de las trabajadoras domésticas debe considerarse, al menos, bajo una triple determinación: la precarización del empleo, las desigualdades de clase social, y las de género. Es importante generar marcos normativos que reduzcan las desigualdades en salud de los/as trabajadores/as precarios/as, en este sentido, Argentina y Uruguay promovieron la promulgación de leyes laborales sobre trabajo doméstico remunerado. En el presente artículo se describen las experiencias entre ambos países sobre los alcances e impactos en la salud del proceso de regularización de este empleo. Sin embargo, se observa un impacto limitado de la formalización del empleo en el trabajo doméstico remunerado, con dificultades para aplicar el modelo de protección del trabajo asalariado tradicional. La legitimación de los derechos también puede llevar a la salud pública y a la salud de los/as trabajadores/as hacia nuevos desafíos y tensiones, que se agravan en el contexto de la pandemia por covid-19.


Abstract In Latin America, 15% of women are paid domestic workers. Being a job without social security or labor rights, almost 80% of this work is done informally. In this sense, the health of these domestic workers should be considered at least under three aspects: precarization of work, social inequality, and gender inequality. Before the need for regulatory frameworks aimed at reducing health inequalities among informal workers, Argentina and Uruguay promoted the enactment of labor laws regarding paid domestic work. This study describes the experiences of both countries, considering the scope and impact of this formalization process on health. The results indicate that formalizing paid domestic work had but a limited impact, with difficulties in applying the traditional model of paid work protection. This legitimation of labor rights may also pose more challenges and tensions for public health and occupational health, which are worsened in the context of the covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Women, Working , Public Health , Occupational Health , Employment
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(4): e227060, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787608

ABSTRACT

Importance: Intensified global economic competition and recent financial crises, including those associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, have contributed to uncertainty about job security. However, little is known about the association of perceived job insecurity with memory function and decline among older adults. Objectives: To investigate the association between perceived job insecurity and subsequent memory function and rate of memory decline among older adults in the US and England. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 10-year prospective population-based cohort study used data from the US Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) collected from 2006 to 2016. Participants included 9538 adults 55 years or older. Data were analyzed from August 1 to 31, 2021. Exposures: Perceived job insecurity (yes vs no) at baseline. Main Outcomes and Measures: Episodic memory z scores at baseline and rate of decline during the follow-up. Results: Among the 9538 study participants, the mean (SD) age at baseline was 60.97 (6.06) years, and 4981 (52.22%) were women. A total of 2320 participants (24.32%) reported job insecurity at baseline (1088 of 3949 [27.55%] in England and 1232 of 5589 [22.04%] in the US). Perceived job insecurity after 55 years of age was associated with lower baseline memory z scores in the fully adjusted model (ß = -0.04 [95% CI, -0.08 to -0.01]) but not with rate of memory decline (ß = 0.01 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.01]). The association appeared to be stronger in the US than in England (job insecurity × US, ß = -0.05 [95% CI, -0.11 to 0.02]), but the estimate was imprecise, potentially owing to low statistical power. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this cohort study suggest that exposure to job insecurity in middle to late life was associated with worse memory function among older adults in the US and England. This association may vary across socioeconomic and social welfare contexts, although future studies with large samples from diverse socioeconomic settings are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Employment , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Memory Disorders/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785626

ABSTRACT

This study identified the acceptance of disability's impact on self-esteem among adults with disabilities in South Korea. This is a four-year follow-up study that obtained data from the Panel Survey of Employment for Persons with Disabilities from 2017 to 2020. In total, 3329 individuals participated. Logistic regression examined the acceptance of disability's effect on self-esteem. These variables were categorized based on the acceptance of disability (high→high, low→high, high→low, and low→low) and self-esteem (low and not low). Compared to the participants with a consistently high acceptance of disability, those with constantly low acceptance were 2.35 times (95% CI 1.81-3.04) more likely to have low self-esteem. When the acceptance of disability was low→high and high→low, the low self-esteem probability was 1.23 and 1.66 times, respectively. Low self-esteem was prominent for the following: men, 50-64-year olds, married, urban, economic activists, the mid-low household income category, and those with sensory disability. Acceptance of disability can adversely affect self-esteem when it is consistently low or changes from high to low. Among socio-economic factors, there were several risk factors that could make individuals more vulnerable to low self-esteem. Therefore, it is necessary to help people accept their disabilities to maintain healthy self-esteem levels.


Subject(s)
Disabled Persons , Adult , Employment , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Republic of Korea , Self Concept
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0264638, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779746

ABSTRACT

Young adults are currently the loneliest demographic in the UK and other Western countries, yet little is known about how they see the causes of their loneliness. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the subjective causes of loneliness among young adults (18-24 years old), particularly those of lower socio-economic status (SES) who are in employment, renting and living in the most deprived areas, since they are the loneliest in the UK. Utilising a free association technique and thematic analysis, and embedded in a phenomenological framework, the subjective causes of loneliness in a matched sample of 48 young adults in the four most deprived boroughs of London are found to cluster around five themes: The Feeling of Being Disconnected, Contemporary Culture, Pressure, Social Comparison and Transitions Between Life Stages. Disconnection arises from feeling one does not matter, is not understood or is unable to express oneself. Challenges pertaining to social media and materialism in contemporary culture contribute to loneliness as does pressure associated with work, fitting in and social comparison. Social media play a major role in exacerbating these experiences. Finally, transitions between life stages such as breakups, loss of significant others and transitory stages to do with education and employment are felt to cause loneliness. The findings suggest potential avenues for loneliness reduction.


Subject(s)
Loneliness , Social Class , Adolescent , Adult , Emotions , Employment , Humans , London , Young Adult
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 874507, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776097

ABSTRACT

The importance of human wellbeing is documented in the literature of development economics because of its intensifying impacts on economic growth and productivity of labor in the long-run. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no empirical study has examined the symmetric association between China's financial institutional development, education, and health outcomes. Thus, our study aims to fill this vacuum by employing an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to explore the impact of financial institutional development and education on life expectancy and infant mortality rate from 1990 to 2020. The empirical analysis reveals that financial institutional development and education report a significant increase in life expectancy and meaningful reduction in mortality rate in the long-run. Based on these findings, the study may deliver intuitive policy implications regarding improvement in health conditions that are imperative for promoting economic growth in the long-run.


Subject(s)
Economic Development , Educational Status , Health Status , China , Employment , Humans
6.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 40(12): 1979, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775468
7.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 40(12): 1979, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775466
8.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266058, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Information on U.S. COVID-19 mortality rates by occupation is limited. We aimed to characterize 2020 COVID-19 fatalities among working Californians to inform preventive strategies. METHODS: We identified laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 fatalities with dates of death in 2020 by matching death certificates to the state's COVID-19 case registry. Working status for decedents aged 18-64 years was determined from state employment records, death certificates, and case registry data and classified as "confirmed working," "likely working," or "not working." We calculated age-adjusted overall and occupation-specific COVID-19 mortality rates using 2019 American Community Survey denominators. RESULTS: COVID-19 accounted for 8,050 (9.9%) of 81,468 fatalities among Californians 18-64 years old. Of these decedents, 2,486 (30.9%) were matched to state employment records and classified as "confirmed working." The remainder were classified as "likely working" (n = 4,121 [51.2%]) or "not working" (n = 1,443 [17.9%]) using death certificate and case registry data. Confirmed and likely working COVID-19 decedents were predominantly male (76.3%), Latino (68.7%), and foreign-born (59.6%), with high school or less education (67.9%); 7.8% were Black. The overall age-adjusted COVID-19 mortality rate was 30.0 per 100,000 workers (95% confidence interval [CI], 29.3-30.8). Workers in nine occupational groups had age-adjusted mortality rates higher than this overall rate, including those in farming (78.0; 95% CI, 68.7-88.2); material moving (77.8; 95% CI, 70.2-85.9); construction (62.4; 95% CI, 57.7-67.4); production (60.2; 95% CI, 55.7-65.0); and transportation (57.2; 95% CI, 52.2-62.5) occupations. While occupational differences in mortality were evident across demographic groups, mortality rates were three-fold higher for male compared with female workers and three- to seven-fold higher for Latino and Black workers compared with Asian and White workers. CONCLUSION: Californians in manual labor and in-person service occupations experienced disproportionate COVID-19 mortality, with the highest rates observed among male, Latino, and Black workers; these occupational group should be prioritized for prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Educational Status , Employment , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupations , Young Adult
9.
Clin Imaging ; 85: 120-122, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763643
10.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264829, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759949

ABSTRACT

This paper examines whether the COVID-19-induced employment shocks are associated with increases in suicides and safety net use in the second and third quarters of 2020. We exploit plausibly exogenous regional variation in the magnitude of the employment shocks in Japan and adopt a difference-in-differences research design to examine and control for possible confounders. Our preferred point estimates suggest that a one-percentage-point increase in the unemployment rate in the second quarter of 2020 is associated with, approximately, an additional 0.52 suicides, 28 unemployment benefit recipients, 88 recipients of a temporary loan program, and 10 recipients of public assistance per 100,000 population per month. A simple calculation based on these estimates suggests that if a region experienced a one-percentage-point increase in the unemployment rate caused by the COVID-19 crisis in the second quarter of 2020, which is roughly equivalent to the third-highest regional employment shock, this would be associated with 37.4%, 60.5%, and 26.5% increases in the total, female, and male suicide rates respectively in July 2020 compared with July 2019. These results are primarily correlational rather than causal due to the limitation of our data and research design, but our baseline findings are robust to several different model specifications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Female , Humans , Male , Public Assistance , Unemployment
11.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 51(2): 69-70, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744322
12.
Sleep ; 45(3)2022 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741017

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: African Americans have faced disproportionate socioeconomic and health consequences associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study examines employment and its association with sleep quality during the initial months of the pandemic in a low-income, predominantly African American adult sample. METHODS: In the early months of COVID-19 (March to May 2020), we administered a survey to an ongoing, longitudinal cohort of older adults to assess the impact of COVID-related changes in employment on self-reported sleep quality (N = 460; 93.9% African American). Participants had prior sleep quality assessed in 2018 and a subset also had sleep quality assessed in 2013 and 2016. Primary analyses focused on the prevalence of poor sleep quality and changes in sleep quality between 2018 and 2020, according to employment status. Financial strain and prior income were assessed as moderators of the association between employment status and sleep quality. We plotted trend lines showing sleep quality from 2013 to 2020 in a subset (n = 339) with all four waves of sleep data available. RESULTS: All participants experienced increases in poor sleep quality between 2018 and 2020, with no statistical differences between the employment groups. However, we found some evidence of moderation by financial strain and income. The trend analysis demonstrated increases in poor sleep quality primarily between 2018 and 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep quality worsened during the pandemic among low-income African American adults. Policies to support the financially vulnerable and marginalized populations could benefit sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , Residence Characteristics
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Work-privacy conflict (WPC) has become an important issue for medical professionals. The cluster-randomized controlled IMPROVEjob study aimed at improving job satisfaction (primary outcome), with additional outcomes such as examining the work-privacy conflict in German general practice personnel. Using baseline data of this study, the relationship between work-privacy conflict and job satisfaction (JS) was analyzed. In addition, factors associated with higher WPC were identified. METHODS: At baseline, 366 participants (general practitioners (GPs) in leadership positions, employed general practitioners, and practice assistants) from 60 German practices completed a questionnaire addressing socio-demographic data and job characteristics. Standardized scales from the German version of the COPSOQ III requested data concerning job satisfaction and work-privacy conflict. Both scores range from 0 (lowest) to 100 (highest). Multilevel analysis accounted for the clustered data. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS and RStudio software, with a significance level set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Job satisfaction was 77.16 (mean value; SD = 14.30) among GPs in leadership positions (n = 84), 79.61 (SD = 12.85) in employed GPs (n = 28), and 72.58 (SD = 14.42) in practice assistants (n = 254). Mean values for the WPC-scale were higher for professionals with more responsibilities: GPs in leadership positions scored highest with 64.03 (SD = 29.96), followed by employed physicians (M = 45.54, SD =30.28), and practice assistants (M = 32.67, SD = 27.41). General practitioners and practice assistants working full-time reported significantly higher work-privacy conflict than those working part-time (p < 0.05). In a multilevel analysis, work-privacy conflict was significantly associated with job satisfaction (p < 0.001). A multiple regression analysis identified working hours, as well as and being a practice owner or an employed physician as factors significantly influencing WPC. DISCUSSION: WPC was high among general practice leaders and practice personnel working full-time. Future interventions to support practice personnel should focus on reducing WPC, as there is good evidence of its effects on job satisfaction.


Subject(s)
General Practice , General Practitioners , Employment , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Privacy , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Science ; 375(6585): 1111-1113, 2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735999

ABSTRACT

Investment in gender-responsive social protection systems and evidence is key to a more equal future post-COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Policy , Caregivers , Employment , Female , Gender Equity , Humans , Male , Violence , Women, Working
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 435, 2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Beyond the sweeping physiological effects of COVID-19 infections in 2020 and 2021, the psychosocial impacts of lockdowns, social distancing, and the associated disruptions to daily life have brought on a simultaneous mental health crisis, particularly among many working mothers who are disproportionately balancing childcare, virtual schooling, and employment vulnerability. The aim of this study was to measure the mental health status of working mothers in the United States and associations with the provision of family-friendly employment benefits one year into the pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were collected from a sample of working mothers in the U.S. using an online survey of mental health status and the receipt of employer-provided family-friendly benefits. Mental health was measured with the Kessler 6 (K-6) and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS). Perceived helpfulness of benefits was assessed through self-reported Likert-scale scores of 0 (not at all helpful) to 4 (extremely helpful) to determine mean helpfulness scores for benefit types. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between receipt of employment benefits and serious mental illness (SMI). RESULTS: A total of 728 participants met the study criteria, 83.7% were non-Hispanic/Latino white and 61.1% were 35-44 years of age. Among study participants, 54.3% (n = 395) and 21.8% (n = 159) reported psychological distress levels associated with moderate mental illness (MMI) and serious mental illness (SMI), respectively. Not receiving benefits was associated with a 50% increase in odds of SMI (aOR = 1.50, 95% CI [1.03-2.20], p = 0.036). Benefits perceived to be the most helpful for participants were flexible hours/schedule (3.5; SD ± 0.9), flexible work location (3.3; SD ± 1.1), and supplemental paid time off (3.1; SD ± 1.1), with mean scores above very helpful. CONCLUSION: Results suggest employment benefits may help support the mental health of working mothers and provide a call to action to employers and policy stakeholders to develop solutions addressing gaps in workplace benefits and mental health support for working parents, with sustainable reform in mind to mitigate employment benefit inequities exposed by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment , Female , Health Status , Humans , Mothers/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715363

ABSTRACT

The societal disruptions resulting from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have caused changes in smoking and alcohol consumption. Using data from the Koreans' Happiness Survey, a nationally representative survey in South Korea, we (1) described population-level smoking and drinking behaviors; (2) assessed changes in smoking and drinking behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic; and (3) identified employment, economic, and sociodemographic factors associated with these changes using multinomial logistic regression. The overall amount of smoking and drinking decreased during the pandemic, but the changes were heterogeneous across subgroups. Male gender, receipt of the basic living allowance, self-employment, unemployment, and chronic disease status were associated with increased smoking, while higher household income, temporary worker status, living with someone (versus alone), and having fewer offline friends were associated with decreased smoking. Male gender, self-employment, living alone, having more offline friends, and chronic disease status were associated with increased drinking, while younger age, male gender, low and high household income (i.e., a U-shaped relationship), long-term rent with a deposit, temporary worker status, and chronic disease status were associated with decreased drinking. Our findings provide evidence on changes in smoking and drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Korea and differential changes across subgroups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Smoking/epidemiology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715326

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has come to change societal organization. Due to lockdowns, work typologies have been rethought and telework has gained strength. However, the impact of the constant use of information and communication technologies on the mental health of workers needs to be considered. We aimed to investigate the impact of different work conditions on mental health, to which end we disseminated an online questionnaire during lockdowns to assess imagined surveillance, mobile maintenance expectation, communication overload, feelings of entrapment, depression, anxiety, stress, and flourishing in four groups (employed in telework, employed on-site, employed in layoff, and unemployed). We computed mean comparisons and serial mediations. We show that depression and anxiety were more prevalent in women; parents flourished more than people without children; and people with a higher level of education feel more entrapment. Crucially, we show that telework was associated with imagined surveillance and communication overload, which mediated the association with mobile maintenance expectations and entrapment (which was exacerbated by parenthood), impacting mental health and the quality of life. However, this was also partially observed in the remaining work conditions. Finally, flourishing worked as a protector against mental health issues in all work conditions. We discuss this given the massification of digital migration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Employment , Female , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleworking
18.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12319, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701416

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Association between employment contract (temporary vs. permanent) and suicidal ideation (persistent suicidal ideation [i.e., with onset before COVID-19] or newly developed under COVID-19 pandemic) was examined using a nationally representative cross-sectional study in Japan. METHODS: An Internet survey was conducted from August to September 2020. The participants' inclusion criteria for this study were as follows: (i) 20-65 years old, (ii) employees (excluding self-employed, students, retired, housewives, and unemployed). The associations of suicidal ideation with the employees' factors were analyzed using the multinomial logistic regression model, adjusting for covariates (sex, age, marital status, education, company size, industries, and a history of psychiatric disease). RESULTS: Of total 12 249 participants, 72.4% were permanent and 27.6% were temporary employees. The prevalence was 8.5% for persistent suicidal ideation and 3.2% for newly developed suicidal ideation in the COVID-19 pandemic. Temporary employment was significantly associated with persistent suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.36 [95% confidence interval, CI: 1.16-1.59]; P < .001), but not associated with newly developed suicidal ideation (aOR = 1.10 [0.85-1.42]; P = .457) after adjusting the covariates. Sensitivity analysis showed temporary employment was significantly associated with persistent suicidal ideation only in women. Newly developed suicidal ideation was significantly higher among participants of a young age, employees in drinking/eating/hotel business industry, and those having a history of psychiatric disease than among the counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Working on a temporary employment contract was associated with persistent suicidal ideation under conditions of COVID-19 outbreaks in Japan. However, the result showed no significant difference in newly developed suicidal ideation. Further longitudinal study will be needed to examine the risk of being employed on an unstable occupational contract in the prolonged pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment/psychology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , Young Adult
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706144

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of precarious employment has increased in recent decades and aspects such as employment insecurity and income inadequacy have intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify, appraise, and synthesise existing evidence pertaining to implemented initiatives addressing precarious employment that have evaluated and reported health and well-being outcomes. We used the PRISMA framework to guide this review and identified 11 relevant initiatives through searches in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and three sources of grey literature. We found very few evaluated interventions addressing precarious employment and its impact on the health and well-being of workers globally. Ten out of 11 initiatives were not purposefully designed to address precarious employment in general, nor specific dimensions of it. Seven out of 11 initiatives evaluated outcomes related to the occupational health and safety of precariously employed workers and six out of 11 evaluated worker health and well-being outcomes. Most initiatives showed the potential to improve the health of workers, although the evaluation component was often described with less detail than the initiative itself. Given the heterogeneity of the 11 initiatives regarding study design, sample size, implementation, evaluation, economic and political contexts, and target population, we found insufficient evidence to compare outcomes across types of initiatives, generalize findings, or make specific recommendations for the adoption of initiatives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263787, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690711

ABSTRACT

Implementing countrywide lockdown measures in India, from March 2020 to May 2020 was a major step to deal with the COVID -19 pandemic crisis. The decision of country lockdown adversely affected the urban migrant population, and a large section of them was compelled to move out of the urban areas to their native places. The reverse migration garnered widespread media attention and coverage in electronic as well as print media. The present study focuses on the coverage of the issue by print media using descriptive natural language text mining. The study uses topic modelling, clustering, and sentiment analysis to examine the articles on migration issues during the lockdown period published in two leading English newspapers in India- The Times of India and The Hindu. The sentiment analysis results indicate that the majority of articles have neutral sentiment while very few articles show high negative or positive polarity. Descriptive topic modelling results show that transport, food security, special services, and employment with migration and migrants are the majorly covered topics after employing Bag of Words and TF-IDF models. Clustering is performed to group the article titles based on similar traits using agglomerative hierarchical clustering.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Mass Media/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , India/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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