Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 80
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263787, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690711

ABSTRACT

Implementing countrywide lockdown measures in India, from March 2020 to May 2020 was a major step to deal with the COVID -19 pandemic crisis. The decision of country lockdown adversely affected the urban migrant population, and a large section of them was compelled to move out of the urban areas to their native places. The reverse migration garnered widespread media attention and coverage in electronic as well as print media. The present study focuses on the coverage of the issue by print media using descriptive natural language text mining. The study uses topic modelling, clustering, and sentiment analysis to examine the articles on migration issues during the lockdown period published in two leading English newspapers in India- The Times of India and The Hindu. The sentiment analysis results indicate that the majority of articles have neutral sentiment while very few articles show high negative or positive polarity. Descriptive topic modelling results show that transport, food security, special services, and employment with migration and migrants are the majorly covered topics after employing Bag of Words and TF-IDF models. Clustering is performed to group the article titles based on similar traits using agglomerative hierarchical clustering.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Mass Media/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , India/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263668, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674017

ABSTRACT

The digitalization process for organizations, which was inevitably accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, raises relevant challenges for Human Resource Management (HRM) because every technological implementation has a certain impact on human beings. Between many organizational HRM practices, recruitment and assessment interviews represent a significant moment where a social interaction provides the context for evaluating candidates' skills. It is therefore relevant to investigate how different interaction frames and relational conditions affect such task, with a specific focus on the differences between face-to-face (FTF) and remote computer-mediated (RCM) interaction settings. In particular, the possibility of qualifying and quantifying the mechanisms shaping the efficiency of interaction in the recruiter-candidate dyad-i.e. interpersonal attunement-is potentially insightful. We here present a neuroscientific protocol aimed at elucidating the impact of FTF vs. RCM modalities on social dynamics within assessment interviews. Specifically, the hyperscanning approach, understood as the concurrent recording and integrated analysis of behavioural-physiological responses of interacting agents, will be used to evaluate recruiter-candidate dyads while they are involved in either FTF or RCM conditions. Specifically, the protocol has been designed to collect self-report, oculometric, autonomic (electrodermal activity, heart rate, heart rate variability), and neurophysiological (electroencephalography) metrics from both inter-agents to explore the perceived quality of the interaction, automatic visual-attentional patterns of inter-agents, as well as their cognitive workload and emotional engagement. The proposed protocol will provide a theoretical evidence-based framework to assess possible differences between FTF vs. RMC settings in complex social interactions, with a specific focus on job interviews.


Subject(s)
Employment/statistics & numerical data , Eye Movements/physiology , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/methods , Psychometrics , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Employment/psychology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Video Recording
3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261277, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581755

ABSTRACT

This paper analyzes the dynamics of the labor market in Latin America during the COVID-19 pandemic. After a decade of a virtuous circle of growth with the creation of formal jobs, the pandemic has had an considerable impact on the region's labor market, generating an unparalleled increase in the proportion of the inactive population, considerable reductions in informality, and, in contrast, smaller fluctuations in formal jobs. In this context, the formal sector, given its lower flexibility, became a "social safety net" that preserved the stability of employment and wages. Based on the findings presented in this paper, it is projected that, starting in 2021, informality will grow to levels higher than those of the pre-COVID-19 era-with 7.56 million additional informal jobs-as a result of the population returning to the labor market to compensate for the declines in incomes. According to the simulations presented, postponing or forgiving income tax payments and social security contributions conditional on the generation of formal jobs could reduce the growth of informality by 50 to 75 percent. Achieving educational improvements has the potential to reduce it by 50 percent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Employment/trends , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupations , Public Policy , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Social Class , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(1): 102363, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Vaccine hesitancy is a major threat to COVID-19 vaccination programs. This study aimed to examine the public attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccines, the variance of these attitudes, and associated determinants within a large COVID-19 outbreak in Vietnam. METHODS: Two focus group discussions were conducted online with 20 people from different socio-economic and profession backgrounds. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants. Discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Key themes were extracted using reflexive thematic analysis method. RESULTS: Four distinct, non-static attitudes including acceptance, conditional acceptance, hesitancy, and anti-vaccination were found. Themes identified as determinants of these attitudes were external factors, internal factors, and risk-benefit self-assessment regarding COVID-19 vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: We found mixed, non-static COVID-19 vaccination attitudes. People's vaccination risk-benefit self-assessment greatly determines the variance of their attitudes over time. Given high public trust in the authorities, the government should take the lead to counter COVID-19 vaccine misinformation. To increase acceptance, vaccine advertising campaigns should focus on providing information about the dangers of COVID-19, the ability to manage side-effects at the vaccination centers, and updated, precise information on both the outbreak and vaccines. Future research is needed to identify the public most common COVID-19 information channels to enable effective community education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Attitude to Health , Educational Status , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vietnam/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546968

ABSTRACT

While ensuring employment opportunities is critical for global progress and stability, workers are now subject to several disruptive trends, including automation, rapid changes in technology and skill requirements, and transitions to low-carbon energy production. Yet, these trends seem almost insignificant compared to labor impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. While much has been written about the pandemic's short-term impacts, this study analyzes anticipated long-term impacts on the labor force of 2029 by comparing original 2029 labor projections to special COVID-adjusted projections recently published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results show that future demand for nearly every type of labor skill and knowledge will increase, while the nature of work shifts from physical to more cognitive activities. Of the nearly three million jobs projected to disappear by 2029 due to COVID, over 91% are among workers without a bachelor's degree. Among workers with a degree demand shifts primarily from business-related degrees to computer and STEM degrees. Results further show that the socialness of labor, which is important for both innovation and productivity, increases in many more industries than it decreases. Finally, COVID will likely accelerate the adoption of teleworking and slightly decrease the rate of workforce automation. These impacts, combined with a shift to more cognitive worker activities, will likely impact the nature of workforce health and safety with less focus on physical injuries and more on illnesses related to sedentary lifestyles. Overall, results suggest that future workers will need to engage more often in training and skill acquisition, requiring life-long learning and skill maintenance strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Workforce/trends , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Occupational Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Teleworking/trends , United States
7.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12273, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406069

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: It is unclear how many workplace COVID-19 preventive measures were maintained during repeated outbreaks. The aim of this study was to investigate a longitudinal change of implementation of workplace preventive measures responding to COVID-19 in Japan. METHODS: An online longitudinal study was conducted using a cohort of full-time employees in Japan, starting in March 2020 (T1), with follow-up surveys in May (T2), August (T3), and November (T4) 2020. A repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the difference among the four surveys in the mean number of 23 predetermined items of the measures implemented. RESULTS: The final sample comprised 800 employees. The mean number of the implemented measures increased from T1 to T2, but did not change from T2 to T3, then decreased from T3 to T4. The number of workplace preventive measures significantly increased from T1 to T2 for 21 items (P < .001), and significantly decreased from T3 to T4 for 14 items (P < .001 to P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: While the preventive measures responding to COVID-19 in the workplace were well-implemented during the earlier phase of the outbreak, they seem to have been relaxed after a huge outbreak (T3 to T4: August to November 2020). Workplaces should be encouraged to continue the preventive measures over repeated outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Health Plan Implementation/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Workplace/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Japan , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
8.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239113, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383734

ABSTRACT

Social distancing interventions can be effective against epidemics but are potentially detrimental for the economy. Businesses that rely heavily on face-to-face communication or close physical proximity when producing a product or providing a service are particularly vulnerable. There is, however, no systematic evidence about the role of human interactions across different lines of business and about which will be the most limited by social distancing. Here we provide theory-based measures of the reliance of U.S. businesses on human interaction, detailed by industry and geographic location. We find that, before the pandemic hit, 43 million workers worked in occupations that rely heavily on face-to-face communication or require close physical proximity to other workers. Many of these workers lost their jobs since. Consistently with our model, employment losses have been largest in sectors that rely heavily on customer contact and where these contacts dropped the most: retail, hotels and restaurants, arts and entertainment and schools. Our results can help quantify the economic costs of social distancing.


Subject(s)
Commerce/trends , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Employment/trends , Infection Control/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Commerce/standards , Commerce/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Datasets as Topic , Employment/economics , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
10.
Scand J Work Environ Health ; 47(7): 509-520, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359380

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: High-quality longitudinal evidence exploring the mental health risk associated with low-quality employment trajectories is scarce. We therefore aimed to investigate the risk of being diagnosed with common mental disorders, substance use disorders, or suicide attempt according to low-quality employment trajectories. METHODS: A longitudinal register-study based on the working population of Sweden (N=2 743 764). Employment trajectories (2005-2009) characterized by employment quality and pattern (constancy, fluctuation, mobility) were created. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models for first incidence (2010-2017) diagnosis of common mental disorders, substance use disorders and suicide attempt as dependent on employment trajectories. RESULTS: We identified 21 employment trajectories, 10 of which were low quality (21%). With the exception of constant solo self-employment, there was an increased risk of common mental disorders (HR 1.07-1.62) and substance use disorders (HR 1.05-2.19) for all low-quality trajectories. Constant solo self-employment increased the risk for substance use disorders among women, while it reduced the risk of both disorders for men. Half of the low-quality trajectories were associated with a risk increase of suicide attempt (HR 1.08-1.76). CONCLUSIONS: Low-quality employment trajectories represent risk factors for mental disorders and suicide attempt in Sweden, and there might be differential effects according to sex - especially in terms of self-employment. Policies ensuring and maintaining high-quality employment characteristics over time are imperative. Similar prospective studies are needed, also in other contexts, which cover the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the mechanisms linking employment trajectories with mental health.


Subject(s)
Employment/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders , Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Sweden/epidemiology
12.
Am J Epidemiol ; 190(8): 1510-1518, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337248

ABSTRACT

Preliminary evidence points to higher morbidity and mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in certain racial and ethnic groups, but population-based studies using microlevel data are lacking so far. We used register-based cohort data including all adults living in Stockholm, Sweden, between January 31, 2020 (the date of the first confirmed case of COVID-19) and May 4, 2020 (n = 1,778,670) to conduct Poisson regression analyses with region/country of birth as the exposure and underlying cause of COVID-19 death as the outcome, estimating relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Migrants from Middle Eastern countries (relative risk (RR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6, 3.8), Africa (RR = 3.0, 95% CI: 2.2, 4.3), and non-Sweden Nordic countries (RR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.8) had higher mortality from COVID-19 than persons born in Sweden. Especially high mortality risks from COVID-19 were found among persons born in Somalia, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, Iran, and Iraq. Socioeconomic status, number of working-age household members, and neighborhood population density attenuated up to half of the increased COVID-19 mortality risks among the foreign-born. Disadvantaged socioeconomic and living conditions may increase infection rates in migrants and contribute to their higher risk of COVID-19 mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Health Status Disparities , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cohort Studies , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East/ethnology , Registries , Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class , Sweden/epidemiology
13.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255342, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332009

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Suicide is a major social and health issue in India. Yearly statistics show a concerning increasing pattern of suicidal deaths in India which is higher in comparison to the global trend. There is limited evidence regarding historical analysis of suicide or any forecasting for suicide in India towards predicting the possible risks of death due to suicide. METHODS: This paper examines the trend of suicide rate and characteristics of suicide victims in India, based on the longitudinal time series data over the last 50 years-collected from the National Crime Record Bureau Reports (1969 to 2018) of the Government of India. In our analysis, we have used the time series model to forecast the suicide rates in India for the next decade. ARIMA (4,1,0) model is found to be the best fit model for forecasting the data. FINDINGS: There has been an observable and rising trend of suicide rates in India over the last five decades. The forecast indicates a continuance of rising suicide cases for an upcoming couple of years in India with a limited decline in the following years. The prediction model indicates a future relatively consistent pattern of suicide in India which does not seem to be a very encouraging trend. As we have not included the period staring the year 2020 onwards affected by Covid-19 and which has several disruptions in personal and family spaces, the projected suicide trend during the period of next two to three years (2020-22) may rise far high and then it may show a declining path. Along with this, there is a shift in means of suicide in the last couple of decades. Constituting the second-highest number of cases, Illness associated suicide was visibly a serious concern. CONCLUSION: The present analysis finds that there is no visible substantial relief for suicide deaths during the coming years in India. On the other hand, more extensive exploration of sample cases may provide important information for suicide prevention. Availability of detailed and more inclusive data will be highly useful for analysis and suicide preventive policies. Investment in public health care and other welfare activities like education and employment generation will yield visible positive results in suicide control.


Subject(s)
Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Educational Status , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Forecasting/methods , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
16.
Am J Orthopsychiatry ; 91(3): 423-431, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275881

ABSTRACT

Preliminary evidence indicates that Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects people differently along social axes, among which socioeconomic status is key. This study used mixed methods to add data from Israel to this developing body of knowledge. Using closed questions, the study compared 126 people living in poverty with 147 people not living in poverty in terms of their economic and employment status, need for assistance, and mental distress. In addition, in order to better understand the experiences of poverty, open questions regarding the effect of COVID-19 on the participants' lives and their means of coping with the pandemic were employed. The study was conducted in May 2020, just after the first lockdown, through online media and through social workers who personally went to disadvantaged neighborhoods to reach out to participants who are vulnerable to digital illiteracy. The analysis points to major differences between the groups, with people in poverty suffering more in terms of their economic and employment situation and mental distress. In addition, we found that people in poverty needed and received more support. The qualitative analysis indicates the specificities of the severe nature of the intersection of poverty and the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Israel , Male , Social Workers , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Am Surg ; 87(10): 1678-1683, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fellows have been uniquely affected by the widespread changes in educational structure, mandatory limitations in elective procedural volume, and hiring freezes during the COVID-19 global pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A voluntary and anonymous survey was distributed to all Graduate Medical Education fellows at a tertiary medical center querying perspectives on clinical and didactic training and job placement. RESULTS: A total of 47 of 121 fellows (39%) completed the survey. The majority were in a medical (43%) or surgical specialty (34%) followed by critical care (13%) and procedure-based (11%) fellowships. Approximately 59% of surveyed fellows felt their programs were providing a virtual curriculum that would train them just as well as the in-person curriculum. Twenty-eight (60%) fellows were in their final or only year of training. Of the 25 fellows who were seeking employment, 52% have experienced difficulty in finding a job due to hiring freezes and 40% have encountered challenges with job interview cancellations and changes to virtual interview formats. CONCLUSION: Almost half of surveyed fellows reported an educational deterioration due to COVID-19 and graduating fellows seeking employment felt hindered by both the virtual interview format and widespread hiring freeze. Fellows are both unique and vulnerable as they balance the solidification of clinical training with securing employment during these tumultuous and unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships , Adult , California/epidemiology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Public Health ; 195: 142-144, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the prevalence and factors associated with paid sick leave benefits among direct service providers who work with people experiencing homelessness. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using an online survey disseminated during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. METHODS: Survey data from 572 direct service providers working in the homeless, supportive housing, and harm reduction service sectors were analyzed for this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of paid sick leave benefits. RESULTS: One hundred one (17.7%) participants did not have any paid sick leave benefits. In the univariate models, paid sick leave was associated with older age, greater family income, full-time work, specific employment settings (supportive housing and not emergency shelters or harm reduction programs), having a regular medical doctor, and fewer occupational impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Older age, full-time work, and non-receipt of emergency financial benefits remained statistically significant predictors in the multivariate model. CONCLUSIONS: Although the majority of service providers working with people experiencing homelessness have some amount of paid sick leave benefits, there is a precariously employed subset of individuals who are younger and working part-time in the sector. Temporary expansion of paid sick leave and removal of waiting periods for new employees to qualify for benefits are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Homeless Persons , Pandemics , Sick Leave/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Harm Reduction , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Sick Leave/economics
19.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(3): 161-165, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spreads heterogeneously, disproportionately impacting poor and minority communities. The relationship between poverty and race is complex, with a diverse set of structural and systemic factors driving higher rates of poverty among minority populations. The factors that specifically contribute to the disproportionate rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection, however, are not clearly understood. METHODS: We evaluated SARS-CoV-2 test results from community-based testing sites in Los Angeles, California, between June and December, 2020. We used tester zip code data to link those results with United States Census report data on average annual household income, rates of healthcare coverage, and employment status by zip code. RESULTS: We analyzed 2 141 127 SARS-CoV-2 test results, of which 245 154 (11.4%) were positive. Multivariable modeling showed a higher likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 test positivity among Hispanic communities than among other races. We found an increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 positivity among individuals from zip codes with an average annual household income

Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Insurance Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Psychiatry Res ; 302: 114055, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253499

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the need for mental health care despite novel barriers to services. Little is known about how the pandemic has affected mental health providers and their practice. In July 2020, we conducted a web-based survey of 500 licensed mental health providers to assess their employment and caseloads, logistics of care, quality of care, and patient-provider relationships and communication during the pandemic. Over 90% of providers reported changes to their employment (e.g., furloughs), with 64% no longer practicing. Providers who reported no longer practicing were older in age, racial minorities, served rural communities, worked in small clinics/provider networks, were social workers and marriage and family therapists, and relied on private insurance or out-of-pocket payment. Most practicing providers reported similar-to-increased caseloads (62%), new patients seeking services (67%), and appointment frequency (70%). Approximately 97% of providers used telemedicine, with 54% providing services mostly-to-exclusively via telemedicine. Most providers reported losing contact with patients deemed unstable (76%) or a danger to themselves/others (71%). Most providers reported maintained-to-improved quality of care (83%), patient-provider relationships (80%), and communication (80%). Results highlight concerns relating to mental health services during the pandemic, however practicing providers have demonstrated resilience to coordinate and provide high quality care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Adult , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Health Care , Southeastern United States/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL