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3.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 255(3): 183-194, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547054

ABSTRACT

Disaster response procedures have been developed and improved following the Great East Japan Earthquake. Innovative services have also been created through digital transformation, including an acceleration and deepening of artificial intelligence technology. Things that were once technically impossible are now possible. These innovative technologies will spread across various fields, and disaster response will not be an exception. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare is promoting the use of personal health records in a way that effectively supports the management of treatments by using data from wearable devices and specific applications. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the trade-off between protecting personal information and enabling social benefits, such as in the use of digital tracking, and infodemics, including misinformation, have become new social challenges. Reviewing past disaster preparedness and the services and value provided by digital transformation indicates what new disaster preparedness should be. Digital transformation does not require literacy (ability to collect, analyze, and use information) but competence (beneficial behavioral traits derived from experience). Understanding behavior through data and enabling rational behavior are crucial. By increasing human productivity, we can save time and improve self- and mutual-help in times of disaster. Medical information and digital services must be properly used in normal times. A society that uses such services will be more disaster resilient.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Disaster Planning , Medical Informatics , COVID-19 , Communication , Empowerment , Humans , Japan , Pandemics
7.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1580-1585, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501151

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Mentorship is valuable to medical students undergoing professional identity formation. Many institutions lack infrastructure to facilitate the personalized mentoring that supports students' integration of new professional identities with their personal identities and values. APPROACH: The authors developed a novel mentorship platform called Weave via a multistep, iterative design process, incorporating in-person and survey-based student and faculty feedback. Features of Weave include clear communication of mentorship offerings and expectations, plus opportunities to engage mentors based on professional and personal (identity-based) attributes. Faculty at Harvard Medical School who created a mentor profile within the first 3 months of launch and students who visited the website within the same period were invited to complete usability surveys in February 2019; students were invited to complete impact surveys in August 2020. OUTCOMES: Fifty-two of 132 invited faculty members (39.4%) and 80 of 185 students (43.2%) completed the usability surveys. Most of these faculty (86.5%) and students (73.8%) reported navigating the website was easy/very easy; 36 faculty (69.2%) created a mentor profile within 10 minutes. Key innovations highlighted by faculty and students were the listing of personal attributes and identities of diverse faculty; centralized, increased access to faculty mentors; ease of use; and provision of clear expectations. Nearly all students who completed the impact surveys agreed that Weave allowed them to connect with a faculty mentor whom they would not have found through other sources and to learn about the dimensions of diverse faculty. NEXT STEPS: Weave is a customizable online mentorship platform that fosters empowered vulnerability and increases dialogue between medical students and faculty based on professional and personal interests and identities. Weave may be expanded to other mentoring contexts and adapted for implementation at other institutions to help cultivate an institutional culture that values mentoring and to strengthen broader diversity and inclusion efforts.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Boston , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communication , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Empowerment , Formative Feedback , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(4): 311-323, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381061

ABSTRACT

The promotion of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in nursing is a topic of renewed importance, given the civil unrest following the death of George Floyd and identified disparities in health and health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite its progress, the nursing profession continues to struggle with recruiting and retaining a workforce that represents the cultural diversity of the patient population. The authors completed a review of the literature on DEI in nursing and found a scarcity of studies, and that a limitation exists due to the strength of the evidence examined. This article aims to provide a review of the literature on DEI in nursing, outcomes and strategies associated with organizational DEI efforts, and knowledge on how the American Nurses Credentialing Center Pathway to Excellence® Designation Program framework supports DEI initiatives. The authors further provided recommendations for nurse leaders and a checklist of proposed questions for assessing commitment, culture, and structural empowerment initiatives toward a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive organization.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Health Equity , Leadership , Nursing/standards , Social Inclusion , COVID-19/epidemiology , Empowerment , Humans , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , Racism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce/organization & administration
11.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 947-950, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364847

ABSTRACT

While advances in science and technology continue to be at the forefront of the evolution of medical practice, the 21st century is also undergoing a unique and profound cultural shift that is changing the very nature of what it means to be a medical professional, namely humankind's transition to an information-based internet society. Medical care will increasingly depend on computer-generated probabilities guided and supported by a growing variety of individuals in health care-related professions, including statisticians, technologists, and information managers. Perhaps the biggest challenge to the profession will come from the erosion of professional autonomy, driven by smart machines, social networks, and internet search engines. As a result of these and other changes, physicians are facing a systematic loss of control, often without the direct input and leadership of the profession itself. In this commentary, the author urges the profession to adopt several strategies, including shifting its focus from reimbursement to the care patients value most, meaningfully addressing critical issues in health policy, becoming the definitive source for publicly available medical information, reimagining medical education, and overhauling the existing accreditation and licensing systems. Medical education must go beyond a focus on physicians whose professional identity revolves around being the exclusive source of medical knowledge. In the digitized 21st century, medical education should emphasize the centrality of the humanistic interface with patients such that the doctor-patient relationship is paramount in the complex medical world of machines and social media. Removing the roadblocks to successful professional reform is no small task, but the process can begin with a grassroots movement that empowers physicians and facilitates organizational and behavioral change. Failure to take action may well hasten the diminishment of patient care and the profession's trusted role in society.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/history , Medical Informatics/instrumentation , Medicine/instrumentation , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Access to Information , Accreditation/methods , Accreditation/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/methods , Empowerment , Health Policy , History, 21st Century , Humans , Knowledge , Leadership , Medical Informatics/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Professional Autonomy , Social Networking
13.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(5): 780-782, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275610

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare professionals and academic facilities are called to provide leadership in disseminating accurate and timely information through approaches that meet the needs of the public. Graduate students from a university in Taiwan collaborated with experts to provide interactive live broadcasting sessions on the COVID-related topics to the public through the Facebook platform. The broadcasting sessions also trained the students to communicate COVID-related information through succinct and interactive presentations. Twelve broadcasting sessions were conducted twice a week for three weeks in May 2020. Upon completion of the broadcasting sessions, students demonstrated growth in professional confidence, assessment of the public's knowledge gaps and needs, and preparation and delivery of professional live broadcasts. We recommend creating a live broadcast training application through an artificial intelligence (AI) expert system. Multidisciplinary academic-practice collaboration in preparing for the broadcasting and engaging in dialogues with the public is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Empowerment , Health Education/organization & administration , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Taiwan
15.
Acad Med ; 96(6): 808-812, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242112

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a worldwide pandemic, with frontlines that look drastically different than in past conflicts: that is, women now make up a sizeable majority of the health care workforce. American women have a long history of helping in times of hardship, filling positions on the home front vacated by men who enlisted as soldiers during World War I and similarly serving in crucial roles on U.S. military bases, on farms, and in factories during World War II. The COVID-19 pandemic has represented a novel battleground, as the first in which women have taken center stage, not only in their roles as physicians, respiratory therapists, nurses, and the like, but also by serving in leadership positions and facilitating innovations in science, technology, and policy. Yet, the pandemic has exacerbated multiple pain points that have disproportionally impacted women in health care, including shortages in correctly sized personal protective equipment and uniforms, inadequate support for pregnant and breastfeeding providers, and challenges associated with work-life balance and obtaining childcare. While the pandemic has facilitated several positive advancements in addressing these challenges, there is still much work to be done for women to achieve equity and optimal support in their roles on the frontlines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Women, Working/history , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Empowerment , Female , Gender Equity , Health Personnel/trends , History, 20th Century , Humans , Leadership , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Women, Working/statistics & numerical data , World War I , World War II
17.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 64(6): 643-655, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196914

ABSTRACT

Older adults' relationship to information and communications technology (ICT) is often discussed in terms of the digital divide or technology gap. Older persons, those 65 years of age and older, are seen as excluded or marginally represented in the digital sphere, even though data show their use of technology is increasing. Challenges in technology adoption and models for improving digital inclusion are both well-known, but the COVID pandemic and its general shift to digital life have created a critical need to increase digital inclusion of older persons. A case study of Older Adults Technology Services (OATS) and the organization's migration from in-person to virtual programming is used as an example of reframing the way the relationship of older adults to technology is seen in the field and in practice. Policy and programming implications of this new view of technology are discussed in the conclusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digital Technology/education , Interpersonal Relations , User-Computer Interface , Videoconferencing , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Empowerment , Female , Humans , Male , Organizational Case Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 369-373, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068159

ABSTRACT

During a pandemic, pregnancy and the postnatal period are complicated by multiple factors. On the one hand, worries about one's own health and the health of loved ones, in particular of the newborn child, can increase the risk of some mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety in the pregnant woman. On the other hand, as happened for the COVID-19 epidemic in Italy, given the need for physical distancing, the maintenance of the social and family network, so important for new parents in the perinatal period, is lacking. In addition, health services are forced to reorganize their offerings to ensure maximum safety for their operators and patients. This work proposes a model of screening and treatment aimed at identifying women at risk and providing them with effective and safe treatment.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Pandemics , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnant Women/psychology , Puerperal Disorders/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Depression, Postpartum/diagnosis , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/therapy , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Empowerment , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Perinatal Care/methods , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , Program Evaluation , Puerperal Disorders/epidemiology , Puerperal Disorders/psychology , Puerperal Disorders/therapy , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Telemedicine
20.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013056

ABSTRACT

Patients admitted to the isolation ward during the COVID-19 outbreak face multiple psychosocial stressors including the disruptive experience of being in quarantine, anxiety over contracting a newly emerging infectious disease and limited access to their healthcare team. This quality improvement project aims to leverage on technology to improve patients' access to, and experience of, care while in isolation.Patients admitted to two isolation wards in Singapore General Hospital (SGH) between 28 February and 19 March 2020 were each provided an iPad loaded with the MyCare application (app), curated materials and mobile games. During this period, 83 of them accessed the device and the app. MyCare app is an app developed by the nursing team in SGH as part of an existing interprofessional collaboration to help patients navigate their care during their inpatient stay. In response to COVID-19, MyCare app was supplemented with materials to address affected patients' informational and psychosocial needs. These materials included an information sheet on COVID-19, interviews with previous severe acute respiratory syndrome survivors, psychosocial support materials, and uplifting literature, illustrated storybooks and artwork.This paper describes the process of planning for, and executing, the intervention and reports the initial results of its effect. Initial feedback indicated a positive response to the intervention. 9 out of 10 respondents (90%) rated their hospital experience with a maximum of five stars and all 10 respondents (100%) rated the psychosocial support materials with five stars. Doctors managing the patients also observed a reduction in the number of commonly asked questions following the deployment of the iPad.This quality improvement project is ongoing with plans for further research to determine how to better support the psychosocial needs of patients in isolation during a novel disease outbreak. This report is written based on the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines.


Subject(s)
Access to Information , COVID-19/psychology , Consumer Behavior , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitalization , Mobile Applications , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Disease Outbreaks , Empowerment , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Young Adult
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