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1.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 37(1): e24816, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Aspergillus endocarditis (AE) is a rare fatal infection. The infection is often reported in patients with prosthetic heart valves, immunosuppressed, broad-spectrum antimicrobial use regimens, and drug abusers. METHODS: Herein, we report a rare case of native mitral valve AE in a 63-year-old man, with a probable COVID-19-associated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis nine months ago treated with antifungals. RESULTS: In the last admission, the lethargy, neurological deficit, and septic-embolic brain abscess in brain MRI led to suspicion of infective endocarditis. Transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiography and color Doppler flow velocity mapping showed a large highly mobile mass destroying leaflet and severe mitral regurgitation. The Surgical valve replacement is performed. The surgical valve replacement is performed. Direct microscopic examination and culture of the explanted and vegetative mass revealed Aspergillus section Fumiagati confirmed by molecular method. Despite the administration of voriconazole and transient improvement the patient expired. CONCLUSION: As AE is a late consequence of COVID-19-associated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, therefore, long-term follow-up of invasive aspergillosis, and prompt diagnosis of surgical and systemic antifungal therapy treatment, are warranted to provide robust management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis/complications , Endocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Aspergillus , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
2.
Age Ageing ; 51(11)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314430

ABSTRACT

More than one-third of the cases of infective endocarditis (IE) occur in older patients. The disease is often characterized by atypical symptoms. The incidence of neurological complications is high and represents a strong independent predictor of severe outcomes and mortality. IE is a rare but serious complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). A persistent delirium as a unique manifestation of post-TAVI IE in an older patient is presented in this clinical case.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Delirium , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Prosthesis-Related Infections , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Humans , Aged , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Prosthesis-Related Infections/epidemiology , Prosthesis-Related Infections/etiology , Endocarditis/etiology , Endocarditis/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/etiology , Delirium/etiology , Delirium/complications , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Aortic Valve , Treatment Outcome , Risk Factors
3.
Br Dent J ; 234(9): 678-681, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318430

ABSTRACT

Purpose To review current practice regarding oral surgery input for patients awaiting cardiac valvular surgery and who are at risk of infective endocarditis (IE) in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to stimulate debate around the indications for pre-operative oral surgery assessment. It also opens the way to developing a new research-based approach which is patient-centred, safe, effective and efficient.Methods A desk-top based patient review was undertaken between 27 March 2020 and 1 July 2022 to record the outcome of patients undergoing cardiac valvular surgery in Northern Ireland, following the revision of the referral guidelines for oral surgery intervention. Data were collected for all cardiac referrals to the oral surgery on-call service in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast. Complications were recorded at two weeks, two months, and six months post-surgery, using Northern Ireland Electronic Care Records.Results In total, 67 cardiac patients were identified between 27 March 2020 and 1 July 2022: 65.7% of patients were male and had an average age of 68, while the female patients had an average age of 61. The mean interval of date of cardiology referral to surgery date was 9.7 working days, with 36% of patients referred within five days of the planned surgery date. Moreover, 39% had valvular surgery in combination with another type of cardiac surgery. No complications linked to dental aetiology were noted.Conclusions This paper raises questions about the advisability of oral surgery input before cardiac surgery for anything other than pain relief, management of acute dental sepsis, or IE whose source has been identified as an oral commensal. The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an opportunity to review current practice and open the way to developing a new approach which is patient-centred, safe, effective and efficient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Oral Surgical Procedures , Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Middle Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/etiology , Endocarditis/etiology , Endocarditis/surgery , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Oral Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 16(5)2023 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315618

ABSTRACT

A man in his late 40s presented to the emergency department with generalised tiredness and breathlessness. He was a known case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and also had a recent history of COVID-19. At arrival, he was in respiratory failure. Blood culture grew Streptococcus parasanguinis, a commensal gram-positive bacterium and a primary coloniser of the human oral cavity. Echocardiogram revealed the presence of a flail mitral valve with vegetation suggestive of infective endocarditis. Although biomarkers of inflammation/infection had improved, he continued to be in cardiac failure, and hence he underwent mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve. This case is unique in many ways; the patient was young, had a history of COVID-19, had native valve infective endocarditis and presented with type 2 respiratory failure and not the usual 'typical' manifestations of infective endocarditis. He had refractory heart failure requiring early valve replacement. His blood culture grew S. parasanguinis, a rare cause for infective endocarditis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Male , Humans , Endocarditis, Bacterial/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/microbiology , Endocarditis/complications , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Mitral Valve/diagnostic imaging , Echocardiography
5.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol ; 134(5): 562-572, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296779

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis in indicated dental procedures. STUDY DESIGN: We searched on Medline/OVID, CINAHL/EBSCO, and EMBASE from January 2011 to January 2022. We included de novo guidelines and excluded adapted or adopted guidelines, and guidelines published before 2011. The guidelines were independently appraised by 4 reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II (AGREE II) Instrument. RESULTS: Four eligible CPGs were appraised: the European Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE), and the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS). Their AGREE II first overall assessments (OA1) were 63%, 58%, 92%, and 71%, respectively. Both NICE and JCS scored the highest in OA1 (>70%), Domain 3 Rigor of Development (85%, 65%), and Domain 5 Applicability (76%, 48%), respectively. The second overall assessment (OA2) of using the CPGs in daily practice was not significantly variable (recommended for use with modifications). CONCLUSION: Three out of 4 CPGs support that the benefits of prevention of infective endocarditis outweigh the risks of antibiotic resistance.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Humans , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/prevention & control , Endocarditis/prevention & control , Endocarditis/drug therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
6.
J Med Case Rep ; 17(1): 120, 2023 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several factors increase the risk of right-sided endocarditis. The tricuspid valve is usually involved in right-sided endocarditis cases. Infective endocarditis of the pulmonic valve is rare, and few cases of pulmonic valve endocarditis were reported previously. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we describe a case of a 81-year-old Middle Eastern male patient, admitted to our hospital three times in a period of 2 months for fever and cough. He had Streptococcus oralis bacteremia with vegetation that was on the pulmonic valve. We diagnosed him with pulmonic valve endocarditis, and he was treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics. CONCLUSION: It is important to keep high suspicion for isolated pulmonic valve endocarditis in patients with respiratory symptoms. Adequate dental care is important in patients with risk factors for infective endocarditis.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Pulmonary Valve , Streptococcal Infections , Humans , Male , Aged, 80 and over , Streptococcus oralis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/drug therapy , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Streptococcal Infections/complications , Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis , Streptococcal Infections/drug therapy
7.
World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg ; 13(4): 523-525, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277275

ABSTRACT

We report a case of endocarditis months after a Bentall procedure. This was caused by Candida Lusitaniae, in an immunocompetent patient with a recent SARS-CoV-2 infection. The patient underwent a new Bentall procedure. SARS-CoV-2 has been associated with co-infection by Candida species since the beginning of the pandemic, nevertheless, Candida Lusitaniae remains a very uncommon causative agent of prosthetic endocarditis. We suggest a possible role of the SARS-CoV-2, which may have delayed the diagnosis of endocarditis and the appropriate therapy.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Endocarditis , Saccharomycetales , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis/microbiology , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Saccharomycetales/isolation & purification
9.
Addict Sci Clin Pract ; 18(1): 9, 2023 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278934

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Injection drug use-related endocarditis is increasingly common among hospitalized patients in the United States, and associated morbidity and mortality are rising. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we present the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe opioid use disorder and multiple episodes of infective endocarditis requiring prosthetic tricuspid valve replacement, who developed worsening dyspnea on exertion. Her echocardiogram demonstrated severe tricuspid regurgitation with a flail prosthetic valve leaflet, without concurrent endocarditis, necessitating a repeat valve replacement. Her care was overseen by our institution's Endocarditis Working Group, a multidisciplinary team that includes providers from addiction medicine, cardiology, infectious disease, cardiothoracic surgery, and neurocritical care. The team worked together to evaluate her, develop a treatment plan for her substance use disorder in tandem with her other medical conditions, and advocate for her candidacy for valve replacement. CONCLUSIONS: Multidisciplinary endocarditis teams such as these are important emerging innovations, which have demonstrated improvements in outcomes for patients with infective endocarditis and substance use disorders, and have the potential to reduce bias by promoting standard-of-care treatment.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Opioid-Related Disorders , Female , Humans , United States , Adult , Tricuspid Valve/surgery , Endocarditis/surgery , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery
10.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 50(2)2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Significant uncertainty exists about the optimal timing of surgery for infectious endocarditis (IE) surgery in patients with active SARS-CoV-2 infection. This case series and a systematic review of the literature were carried out to evaluate the timing of surgery and postsurgical outcomes for patients with COVID-19-associated IE. METHODS: The PubMed database was searched for reports published from June 20, 2020, to June 24, 2021, that contained the terms infective endocarditis and COVID-19. A case series of 8 patients from the authors' facility was also added. RESULTS: A total of 12 cases were included, including 4 case reports that met inclusion criteria in addition to a case series of 8 patients from the authors' facility. Mean (SD) patient age was 61.9 (17.1) years, and patients were predominantly male (91.7%). Being overweight was the main comorbidity among patients studied (7/8 [87.5%]). Among all patients evaluated in this study, dyspnea (n = 8 [66.7%]) was the leading symptom, followed by fever (n = 7 [58.3%]). Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus caused 75.0% of COVID-19-associated IE. The mean (SD) time to surgery was 14.5 (15.6) days (median, 13 days). In-hospital and 30-day mortality for all evaluated patients was 16.7% (n = 2). CONCLUSION: Clinicians must carefully assess patients diagnosed with COVID-19 to prevent missing underlying diseases such as IE. If IE is suspected, clinicians should avoid postponement of crucial diagnostic and treatment steps.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis/surgery , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(12)2022 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286385

ABSTRACT

A man in his 20s attended the emergency department with three days of fever, headache, reduced appetite and a sore throat. COVID-19 point-of-care test was negative. Blood cultures grew a gram-negative coccobacillus, Neisseria elongata Following an episode of confusion, MRI head revealed septic emboli. Prolapse of the mitral valve with regurgitation was noted on echocardiography. Infection was found to have originated from multiple dental caries and treatment required a combination of dental extraction, prolonged antibiotic therapy and surgery for mitral valve repair.N. elongata is part of the normal oropharyngeal flora but is also a rare cause of endocarditis. There are no established treatment guidelines for endocarditis of this aetiology. N. elongata endocarditis may present atypically, with a murmur only developing several days later. 'Classical' stigmata should not be relied on to make a diagnosis. N. elongata predominantly affects the left side of the heart and predisposes to embolic events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Caries , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Male , Humans , Endocarditis, Bacterial/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery , Mitral Valve/surgery
12.
Kardiologiia ; 63(1): 3-11, 2023 Jan 31.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266806

ABSTRACT

For the recent 20 years, substantial changes have occurred in all aspects of infectious endocarditis (IE), the evolution of risk factors, modernization of diagnostic methods, therapeutic and preventive approaches. The global trends are characterized by increased IE morbidity among people older than 65 who use intravenous psychoactive drugs. The epidemiological trend is represented by reduced roles of chronic rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart defects, increased proportion of IE associated with medical care, valve replacement, installation of intracardiac devices, and increased contribution of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. to the IE etiology. Additional visualization methods (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with 18F-fludesoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET-CT), labeled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and modernization of the etiological diagnostic algorithm for determining the true pathogen (immunochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, sequencing) also become increasingly important. The COVID-19 pandemic has also adversely contributed to the IE epidemiology. New prospects of treatment have emerged, such as bacteriophages, lysins, oral antibacterial therapy, minimally invasive surgical strategies (percutaneous mechanical aspiration), endovascular mechanical embolectomy. The physicians' compliance with clinical guidelines (CG) is low, which contributes to the high rate of adverse outcomes of IE, while simple adherence to the CG together with more frequent use of surgical treatment doubles survival. Systematic adherence to CG, timely prevention and implementation of the Endocarditis Team into practice play the decisive role in a favorable prognosis of dynamically changing IE. This article presents the authors' own data that confirm the evolutionary trends of current IE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Humans , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/adverse effects , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , Radiopharmaceuticals , Pandemics , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis/etiology
13.
Mol Psychiatry ; 28(2): 543-552, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2160184

ABSTRACT

The incidence of endocarditis in the US is increasing, driven in part by the rise in intravenous drug use, mostly opioids and stimulant drugs (cocaine and methamphetamine). Recent reports have documented that individuals with COVID-19 are at increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unknown whether COVID-19 is associated with increased risk for endocarditis in patients with opioid or stimulant use disorders. This is a retrospective cohort study based on a nationwide database of electronic health records (EHRs) of 109 million patients in the US, including 736,502 patients with a diagnosis of opioid use disorder (OUD) and 379,623 patients with a diagnosis of cocaine use disorder (CocaineUD). Since Metamphetamine use disorder is not coded we could not analyze it. We show that the incidence rate of endocarditis among patients with OUD or CocaineUD significantly increased from 2011 to 2022 with acceleration during 2021-2022. COVID-19 was associated with increased risk of new diagnosis of endocarditis among patients with OUD (HR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.92-2.60) and with CocaineUD (HR: 2.24, 95% CI: 1.79-2.80). Clinically diagnosed COVID-19 was associated with higher risk of endocarditis than lab-test confirmed COVID-19 without clinical diagnosis. Hospitalization within 2 weeks following COVID-19 infection was associated with increased risk of new diagnosis of endocarditis. The risk for endocarditis did not differ between patients with and without EHR-recorded vaccination. There were significant racial and ethnic differences in the risk for COVID-19 associated endocarditis, lower in blacks than in whites and lower in Hispanics than in non-Hispanics. Among patients with OUD or CocaineUD, the 180-day hospitalization risk following endocarditis was 67.5% in patients with COVID-19, compared to 58.7% in matched patients without COVID-19 (HR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.07-1.35). The 180-day mortality risk following the new diagnosis of endocarditis was 9.2% in patients with COVID-19, compared to 8.0% in matched patients without COVID-19 (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.83-1.61). This study shows that COVID-19 is associated with significantly increased risk for endocarditis in patients with opioid or cocaine use disorders. These results highlight the need for endocarditis screening and for linkage to infectious disease and addiction treatment in patients with opioid or cocaine use disorders who contracted COVID-19. Future studies are needed to understand how COVID-19 damages the heart and the vascular endothelium among people who misuse opioids or cocaine (presumably also methamphetamines).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cocaine , Endocarditis , Opioid-Related Disorders , Humans , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Cocaine/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Opioid-Related Disorders/complications , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Endocarditis/complications , Endocarditis/epidemiology , Endocarditis/chemically induced
15.
Turk J Med Sci ; 52(2): 445-455, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infective endocarditis (IE) is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among cardiovascular diseases. ENDOCARDITIS-TR study aims to evaluate the compliance of the diagnostic and therapeutic methods being used in Turkey with current guidelines. METHODS: The ENDOCARDITIS-TR trial is a multicentre, prospective, observational study consisting of patients admitted to tertiary centres with a definite diagnose of IE. In addition to the demographic, clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic findings of the patients, adverse events, indications for surgery, and in-hospital mortality were recorded during a 2-year time interval. RESULTS: A total of 208 IE patients from 7 tertiary centres in Turkey were enrolled in the study. The study population included 125 (60.1%) native valve IE (NVE), 65 (31.3%) prosthetic IE (PVIE), and 18 (8.7%) intracardiac device-related IE (CDRIE). One hundred thirty-five patients (64.9%) were culture positive, and the most frequent pathogenic agent was methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (18.3%). Among 155 (74.5%) patients with an indication for surgery, only 87 (56.1%) patients underwent surgery. The all-cause mortality rate was 29.3% in-hospital follow-up. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that absence of surgery when indicated (HR: 3.29 95% CI: 0.93-11.64 p = 0.05), albumin level at admission (HR: 0.46 95% CI: 0.29-0.73 P < 0.01), abscess formation (HR: 2.11 95% CI: 1.01-4.38 p = 0.04) and systemic embolism (HR: 1.78 95% CI: 1.05-3.02 p = 0.03) were ascertained independent predictors of in-hospital all-cause mortality. DISCUSSION: The short-term results of the ENDOCARDITIS-TR trial showed the high frequency of staphylococcal IE, relatively high in-hospital mortality rates, shortage of surgical treatment despite guideline-based surgical indications and low usage of novel imaging techniques. The results of this study will provide a better insight to physicians in respect to their adherence to clinical practice guidelines.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Albumins , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis/microbiology , Endocarditis/therapy , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/microbiology , Endocarditis, Bacterial/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Methicillin , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Turkey/epidemiology
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(8)2022 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042854

ABSTRACT

Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a surgical emergency if it causes paraplegia. Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci are the most common causes. Streptococcus gallolyticus has been reported to cause SEA only on three occasions earlier-all were associated with endocarditis or colonic malignancy. We report an older woman with diabetic ketoacidosis who presented with poorly localised back pain, fever and altered sensorium. Her lumbar puncture revealed frank pus, and MRI showed an SEA. She could not be weaned from mechanical ventilation post-surgical decompression, and she succumbed to ventilator-associated pneumonia. A triad of fever, back pain and neurological deficit should lead one to consider intraspinal suppuration. This report is the first S. gallolyticus-related SEA from India and the first in literature that was not associated with either endocarditis or colonic malignancy.


Subject(s)
Colonic Neoplasms , Endocarditis , Epidural Abscess , Aged , Back Pain/complications , Colonic Neoplasms/complications , Endocarditis/complications , Epidural Abscess/complications , Epidural Abscess/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Streptococcus gallolyticus
17.
Intern Med ; 61(23): 3537-3540, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029867

ABSTRACT

A 34-year-old previously healthy Japanese woman was diagnosed with COVID-19 and treated with remdesivir and dexamethasone. She was discharge but returned the next day due to acute myocardial infarction. Conservative treatment was selected because of an embolic occlusion in the distal portion. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right renal infarction and multiple cerebral embolisms, respectively; she had a fever of 38.9°C that night. Blood culture was positive for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed an 11-mm vegetation on the posterior mitral valve leaflet. Native mitral valve infective endocarditis causing multiple embolizations was diagnosed. She underwent surgical mitral valve replacement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Female , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnostic imaging , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Mitral Valve/surgery , Staphylococcus aureus
18.
J Emerg Med ; 63(2): 304-305, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004213
19.
J Card Surg ; 37(9): 2845-2848, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971110

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Candida Parapsilosis is an unusual agent of prosthetic endocarditis in immunocompetent individuals but Coronavirus disease 2019 is reported to be associated with a transient immunodeficency that exposes patientes to opportunistic infections. CASE REPORT: We describe a dreadful case of Candida Parapsilosis endocarditis in a transient immunosuppressed patient recently infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus 2019. CONCLUSION: Considering that the symptoms of Candida Parapsilosis infection and the symptoms of Coronavirus disease-2019 may overlap, it is important never to understimate the non-specific symptoms to improve patient outcome, especially in patient with previous Coronavirurs disease-2019 infection and with prosthetic material grafting.


Subject(s)
Abscess , COVID-19 , Candida parapsilosis , Candidiasis , Endocarditis , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Abscess/etiology , Abscess/microbiology , Abscess/surgery , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Candida parapsilosis/isolation & purification , Candidiasis/etiology , Candidiasis/microbiology , Endocarditis/etiology , Endocarditis/microbiology , Endocarditis/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects , Heart Valve Prosthesis/microbiology , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Reoperation , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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