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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(21)2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090206

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is defined as ectopic endometrial tissues dispersed outside the endometrium. This can cause disruption in hormonal and immunological processes, which may increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Worsening of endometriosis symptoms may occur as a result of this infection. The aim of our review was to estimate the pooled prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in endometriosis patients. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, Science Direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases were searched, using the keywords: (endometriosis) AND (COVID-19 OR SARS-CoV-2). Forest plots and pooled estimates were created using the Open Meta Analyst software. After screening 474 articles, 19 studies met the eligibility criteria for the systematic review, and 15 studies were included in the meta-analyses. A total of 17,799 patients were analyzed. The pooled prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in endometriosis patients was 7.5%. Pooled estimates for the health impacts were 47.2% for decreased access to medical care, 49.3% increase in dysmenorrhea, 75% increase in anxiety, 59.4% increase in depression, and 68.9% increase in fatigue. Endometriosis patients were undeniably impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused the worsening of symptoms such as dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, anxiety, depression, and fatigue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , Female , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Endometriosis/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Dysmenorrhea , Prevalence , Fatigue
2.
Cannabis Cannabinoid Res ; 7(4): 473-481, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978198

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Endometriosis affects 1 in 10 women worldwide, with most experiencing difficulties achieving adequate symptom control. These difficulties have been compounded by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic due to worldwide shifts in health care resource allocation. As cannabis is a relatively common form of self-management in endometriosis, this study aims to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cannabis consumption in those with endometriosis. Methods: An anonymous, cross-sectional online international survey was developed and promoted by endometriosis advocacy/support organizations worldwide. Respondents needed to have a diagnosis of endometriosis and be aged between 18 and 55. Results: A total of 1634 responses were received from 46 different countries. The average age of respondents was 30, with a mean diagnosis age of 25. Eight hundred forty-six respondents (51%) reported consuming cannabis in the past 3 months, with 55% of these reporting use for symptom management only. One in five respondents (20%) reported having consumed cannabis previously, the most common reason for discontinuation (65%) was access difficulties during COVID. Those who had legal access were more likely to consume cannabis than those without (p<0.0001) and were more likely to disclose usage to health care professionals (p<0.0001). The most common reasons for consuming cannabis during COVID was increased stress/anxiety (59%) and lack of access to normal medical care (48%). Pre-pandemic, cannabis was mostly consumed at least once a day (61%) and in inhaled forms (51.6%). Consumption increased for most people (57%) during the pandemic. During the pandemic just under a quarter (23%) of respondents changed their mode of consumption, with a reduction in inhaled forms (39.5%) and an increase in consumption of edibles (40%) or oil (25.2%). Conclusions: Cannabis consumption, especially for symptom relief, was relatively common among those with endometriosis, with some people starting their consumption of cannabis due to health care restrictions that occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Difficulties accessing cannabis and unpleasant/unwanted side effects were the most common reasons for lack of current cannabis consumption in those who had previously consumed it. Cannabis consumption may form an important part of endometriosis management especially when access to routine medical care is restricted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cannabis , Endometriosis , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cannabis/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Am J Reprod Immunol ; 88(4): e13602, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956679

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Starting from November 2019, the world has had to face a devastating pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. Various studies have identified potential risk factors facilitating the infection, however it has not been demonstrated whether endometriosis might represent one of them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if patients with endometriosis had a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 infection and, in such case, whether they developed a more severe infection than the general population. Furthermore, this study evaluated the possible correlation with the stage of endometriosis, based on the r-ASRM score, and the potential worsening of the disease during the SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHOD OF STUDY: A case-control study was conducted from March 2020 to April 2021 at Macedonio Melloni Hospital, in Milan. A total of 401 women were recruited. The cases were 201 women with clinical or surgical diagnosis of endometriosis. The control group consisted of 200 women, without the disease. All women completed a self-administered questionnaire which evaluated their demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as a potential diagnosis of Covid-19. RESULTS: Comparison between the two groups showed that women with endometriosis had a higher frequency of COVID-19 than the control subjects (23% vs. 13.5%, P = .014), with a greater prevalence of fever (14.4% vs. 6%, P = .008) and myalgias or arthralgias (11.4% vs. 4.5%, P = .01). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, women with endometriosis had a higher risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2 infection (OR = 2.11, 95% IC: 1.20-3.80), regardless the stage of the disease. CONCLUSION: Endometriosis increases the susceptibility to COVID-19, and women who suffer from it should be considered as fragile patients, worthy of prior access to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Case-Control Studies , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e052765, 2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923232

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine women's perceptions of endometriosis-associated disease burden and its impact on life decisions and goal attainment. DESIGN: An anonymous online survey was distributed in October 2018 through the social media network MyEndometriosisTeam.com. PARTICIPANTS: Women aged 19 years and older living in several English-speaking countries who self-identified as having endometriosis. OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perspectives on how endometriosis has affected their work, education, relationships, overall life decisions and attainment of goals. Subanalyses were performed for women who identified as 'less positive about the future' (LPAF) or had 'not reached their full potential' (NRFP) due to endometriosis. RESULTS: 743 women completed the survey. Women reported high levels of pain when pain was at its worst (mean score, 8.9 on severity scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst imaginable pain)) and most (56%, n=415) experienced pain daily. Women reported other negative experiences attributed to endometriosis, including emergency department visits (66%, n=485), multiple surgeries (55%, n=406) and prescription treatments for symptoms of endometriosis (72%, n=529). Women indicated that they believed endometriosis had a negative impact on their educational and professional achievements, social lives/relationships and overall physical health. Most women 'somewhat agreed'/'strongly agreed' that endometriosis caused them to lose time in life (81%, n=601), feel LPAF (80%, n=589) and feel they had NRFP (75%, n=556). Women who identified as LPAF or NRFP generally reported more negative experiences than those who were non-LPAF or non-NRFP. CONCLUSIONS: Women who completed this survey reported pain and negative experiences related to endometriosis that were perceived to negatively impact major life-course decisions and attainment of goals. Greater practitioner awareness of the impact that endometriosis has on a woman's life course and the importance of meaningful dialogue with patients may be important for improving long-term management of the disease and help identify women who are most vulnerable.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/diagnosis , Female , Goals , Humans , Male , Pain , Quality of Life
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917496

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The main aim of this research was to examine the factors leading to pain-induced disability by assessing the impact of demographic, endometriosis-specific, pandemic-specific, and mental health factors. (2) Methods: Women with endometriosis who attended online support groups were invited to respond to an online survey during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. The Pain Disability Index (PDI) was employed to assess disability-related daily functioning. Independent predictors of pain-induced disability were determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. (3) Results: The mean PDI score of the study population was 31.61 (SD = 15.82), which was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than that reported in a previously published normative study of the German population. In the present study, a high level of pain-induced disability, as defined by scores equal to or higher than the median of the study population, older age (OR 1.063, 95% CI 1.010-1.120, p = 0.020), dysmenorrhea (OR 1.015, 95% CI 1.005-1.026, p = 0.005), dysuria (OR 1.014; 95% CI 1.001-1.027, p = 0.029), lower back pain (OR 1.018, 95% CI 1.007-1.029, p = 0.001), and impaired mental health (OR 1.271, 95% CI 1.134-1.425, p < 0.001) were found to be independent risk factors. Pandemic-specific factors did not significantly influence the pain-induced disability of the participants in this study. (4) Conclusions: The level of pain-induced disability was significantly higher among the women with endometriosis than among women in the normative German validation study. Our findings identified risk factors for experiencing a high level of pain-induced disability, such as demographic and specific pain characteristics. Pandemic-specific factors did not significantly and independently influence the pain-induced disability during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. Impaired mental health negatively influenced functioning during daily activities. Thus, women with endometriosis should be managed by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals to prevent negative effects of pain-induced disability on their quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dysmenorrhea/epidemiology , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Endometriosis/psychology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
6.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(4): 480-486, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806233

ABSTRACT

Background: Endometriosis is a debilitating chronic inflammatory disease. The current SARS-COV2 pandemic has had an impact on the management of these patients. Tele-health care has been a relevant tool. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the SARS-COV2 pandemic on the perceived clinical health status and the type of care received in patients with endometriosis. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 945 premenopausal women treated at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona between October 1 and December 31, 2020. Five hundred forty-nine women had endometriosis, and 396 had other benign gynecological diseases. An online health survey was sent to these patients. Clinicopathological features data were recorded. Results: Compared to patients with other benign gynecological diseases, a higher proportion of patients with endometriosis reported worsening of their symptoms (148/549, 27% vs. 85/396, 21.5%) and concern about their disease (515/549, 93.8% vs. 342/396, 86.4%), and more frequently received tele-health care (73.8% vs. 54.0%) during the pandemic. Patients with endometriosis and "significant" pelvic pain reported more concern and worsening than patients without "significant" pelvic pain, and evaluated the assistance received poorly. Multivariate analysis showed pelvic pain, limitation in usual activity, and sadness as risk factors of perception of disease worsening. Awaiting surgery and the feeling of sadness were risk factors of concern. Conclusions: Patients with endometriosis, and especially patients with "significant" pelvic pain, reported greater concern and the perception of worsening during the SARS-COV2 pandemic. Tele-health is a useful tool in patients with endometriosis, and face-to-face visit should be considered in those reporting "significant" pelvic pain. Clinical Trial Registration Number: HCB 1202011497.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Endometriosis/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pelvic Pain/etiology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifaceted chronic pain condition that can have a negative impact on mental health. Patients suffering from chronic pain may face an additional psychological burden during adversity, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The main aim of this research was to evaluate the prevalence of self-reported depression and anxiety, the influence of demographic, endometriosis-specific, pandemic-specific factors, and resilience on mental health outcomes of patients with endometriosis. METHODS: An online survey was conducted through patient support groups of women suffering from endometriosis during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The PHQ-4 questionnaire, which combines two items of the Patient Health Questionnaire for Depression (PHQ-2) and two items from the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-2) was used to assess self-reported mental health. The Brief Resilience Score (BRS) was employed to evaluate resilience. Independent risk and protective factors for mental health were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The PHQ-4 questionnaire was completed by 274 respondents. More than 40% reached depression (PHQ-2) and anxiety (GAD-2) scores of ≥3, and more than 20% achieved PHQ-2 and GAD-2 scores of ≥5. High resilience was found to be a reliable and strong independent protector for the probability of developing adverse psychological outcomes: OR 0.295, p < 0.001 for developing generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-2 ≥ 3), and OR 0.467, p < 0.001 for having major depression (PHQ-2 ≥ 3). CONCLUSIONS: Pain-induced disability is an independent risk factor for developing major depression and anxiety, while resilience was identified as a potential protective parameter in terms of positive psychological outcomes in women with endometriosis. The results of this study may help to identify women at risk for adverse mental health outcomes and should encourage healthcare practitioners to establish strategies for the reduction of negative psychological and psychiatric impacts on patients with endometriosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Endometriosis , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(7)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785739

ABSTRACT

Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a frequently used plasticizer that may be linked to the development of endometriosis, a common gynecological disorder with a profound impact on quality of life. Despite its prevalence, vital access to treatment has often been hampered by a lack of understanding of its pathogenesis as well as reliable disease models. Recently, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been suggested to have a significant role in endometriosis pathophysiology. In this study, we found that DEHP treatment enhanced proliferation, migration, and inflammatory responses, along with EMT and stemness induction in human endometrial and endometriotic cells. The selective transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) receptor type 1/2 inhibitor LY2109761 reversed the DEHP-induced cell proliferation and migration enhancement as well as the increased expression of crucial molecules involved in inflammation, EMT, and stemness, indicating that DEHP-triggered phenomena occur via the TGF-ß/Smad signaling pathway. Our study clearly defines the role of DEHP in the etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of endometriosis and establishes an efficient disease model for endometriosis using a biomimetic 3D cell culture technique. Altogether, our data provide novel etiological and mechanistic insights into the role of DEHP in endometriosis pathogenesis, opening avenues for developing novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Diethylhexyl Phthalate , Endometriosis , Cell Proliferation , Diethylhexyl Phthalate/metabolism , Diethylhexyl Phthalate/toxicity , Endometriosis/pathology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Female , Humans , Phthalic Acids , Quality of Life , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factors/metabolism
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662665

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis, an estrogen-dependent chronic gynecological disease, is characterized by a systemic inflammation that affects circulating red blood cells (RBC), by reducing anti-oxidant defenses. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential beneficial effects of licorice intake to protect RBCs from dapsone hydroxylamine (DDS-NHOH), a harmful metabolite of dapsone, commonly used in the treatment of many diseases. A control group (CG, n = 12) and a patient group (PG, n = 18) were treated with licorice extract (25 mg/day), for a week. Blood samples before (T0) and after (T1) treatment were analyzed for: i) band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation and high molecular weight aggregates; and ii) glutathionylation and carbonic anhydrase activity, in the presence or absence of adjunctive oxidative stress induced by DDS-NHOH. Results were correlated with plasma glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) concentrations, measured by HPLC-MS. Results showed that licorice intake decreased the level of DDS-NHOH-related oxidative alterations in RBCs, and the reduction was directly correlated with plasma GA concentration. In conclusion, in PG, the inability to counteract oxidative stress is a serious concern in the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. GA, by protecting RBC from oxidative assault, as in dapsone therapy, might be considered as a new potential tool for preventing further switching into severe endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects , Dapsone/adverse effects , Endometriosis/chemically induced , Glycyrrhiza , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protective Agents/therapeutic use , Adult , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Endometriosis/prevention & control , Erythrocytes/drug effects , Female , Glycyrrhiza/chemistry , Humans , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Young Adult
10.
Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol ; 50(3): 211-219, 2022 03.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641270

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To provide clinical practice guidelines about fertility preservation (FP) for women with benign gynecologic disease (BGD) developed by a modified Delphi consensus process for oocyte vitrification in women with benign gynecologic disease. METHODS: A steering committee composed of 14 healthcare professionals and a patient representative with lived experience of endometriosis identified 42 potential practices related to FP for BGD. Then 114 key stakeholders including various healthcare professionals (n=108) and patient representatives (n=6) were asked to participate in a modified Delphi process via two online survey rounds from February to September 2020 and a final meeting. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this final meeting to reach consensus was held as a videoconference in November 2020. RESULTS: Survey response of stakeholders was 75 % (86/114) for round 1 and 87 % (75/86) for round 2. Consensus was reached for the recommendations for 28 items, that have been distributed into five general categories: (i) Information to provide to women of reproductive age with a BGD, (ii) Technical aspects of FP for BGD, (iii) Indications for FP in endometriosis, (iv) Indications for FP for non-endometriosis BGD, (v) Indications for FP after a fortuitous diagnosis of an idiopathic diminished ovarian reserve. CONCLUSION: These guidelines provide some practice advice to help health professionals better inform women about the possibilities of cryopreserving their oocytes prior to the management of a BGD that may affect their ovarian reserve and fertility. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): The CNGOF (Collège National des Gynécologues Obstétriciens Français) funded the implementation of the Delphi process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/therapy , Female , Humans , Oocytes/physiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitrification
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546474

ABSTRACT

Brachial plexus injury is a rare but potentially serious complication of laparoscopic surgery. Loss of motor and/or sensory innervation can have a significant impact on the patient's quality of life following otherwise successful surgery. A 38-year-old underwent elective laparoscopic management of severe endometriosis during which she was placed in steep head-down tilt Lloyd-Davies position for a prolonged period. On awakening from anaesthesia, the patient had no sensation or movement of her dominant right arm. A total plexus brachialis injury was suspected. As advised by a neurologist, an MRI brachial plexus, nerve conduction study and electromyography were requested. She was managed conservatively and made a gradual recovery with a degree of residual musculocutaneous nerve neuropathy. The incidence of brachial plexus injury following laparoscopy is unknown but the brachial plexus is particularly susceptible to injury as a result of patient positioning and prolonged operative time. Patient positioning in relation to applied clinical anatomy is explored and risk reduction strategies described.


Subject(s)
Brachial Plexus Neuropathies , Brachial Plexus , Endometriosis , Adult , Brachial Plexus Neuropathies/etiology , Endometriosis/surgery , Female , Humans , Musculocutaneous Nerve , Quality of Life
12.
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol ; 62(1): 164-167, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528349

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is known to impact work productivity. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a shift in working practices for many, with an increase in working from home and/or flexible working hours. The aim of this online cross-sectional study was to determine if these changes resulted in changes in symptom management and productivity in Australian people with endometriosis. Three hundred and eighty-nine people responded to the survey. The majority of respondents found that their endometriosis symptoms were much easier to manage, and they were more productive. A key factor was flexibility in work hours and the increased ability to self-manage their time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , Australia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1924-1934, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493393

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced healthcare providers to reorganize their activities to protect the population from infection, postponing or suspending many medical procedures. Patients affected by chronic conditions were among the most affected. In the case of catastrophes, women have a higher lifetime prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and those with endometriosis have higher anxiety levels, making them fragile in such circumstances. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, conducted in May 2020, we considered all women aged ≥18 years, followed up at our referral centre for endometriosis. Patients were sent an anonymous 6-section questionnaire via email, containing different validated tools for the evaluation of anxiety levels and the risk of PTSD. A multivariable linear regression was performed to assess the impact of patients' characteristics on the distress caused by the SARS-COV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: Among the 468 women recruited, 68.8% were quite-to-extremely worried about not being able to access gynaecologic care, with almost one-third of them scoring ≥33 on the IES-R. Older age and increased levels of anxiety were associated with higher risks of PTSD (age: b = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.12 - 0.44; GAD-7: b = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.38 - 2.05), with up to 71.8% of patients with severe anxiety (GAD-7 > 15) having an IES-R score ≥33 suggestive for PTSD. Women who could leave home to work showed lower levels of PTSD (b = -4.79, 95% CI = -8.44 to - 1.15, ref. unemployed women). The implementation of telemedicine in routine clinical practice was favourably viewed by 75.6% of women. DISCUSSION: Women with endometriosis are particularly exposed to the risk of PTSD during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, especially if they are older or have higher levels of anxiety. Gynaecologists should resort to additional strategies, and telemedicine could represent a feasible tool to help patients cope with this situation.KEY MESSAGESThe COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted the lives of women with endometriosis, who appeared to have a considerable risk of PTSD.Older age, higher anxiety levels and unemployment were independently associated with the risk of developing PTSD.Clinicians should develop successful alternative strategies to help patients cope with this situation, and telemedicine might represent an applicable and acceptable solution.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Endometriosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Young Adult
14.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 27(5): 1014-1016, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate our application of the ghost ileostomy in the setting of laparoscopic segmental bowel resection for symptomatic bowel endometriosis nodule. DESIGN: Technical step-by-step surgical video description (educative video) SETTING: University Tertiary Hospital. Institutional Review Board ruled that approval was not required for this study. Endometriosis affects the bowel in 3% to 37% of all cases, and in 90% of these cases, the rectum or sigmoid colon is also involved. Infiltration up to the rectal mucosa and invasion of >50% of the circumference have been suggested as an indication for bowel resection [1]. Apart from general risks (bleeding, infection, direct organ injuries) and bowel and bladder dysfunctions, anastomotic leakage is one of the most severe complications. In women with bowel and vaginal mucosa endometriosis involvement, there is a risk of rectovaginal fistula after concomitant rectum and vagina resections. Hence, for lower colorectal anastomosis, the use of temporary protective ileostomy is usually recommended to prevent these complications but carries on stoma-related risks, such as hernia, retraction, dehydration, prolapse, and necrosis. Ghost ileostomy is a specific technique, first described in 2010, that gives an easy and safe option to prevent anastomotic leakage with maximum preservation of the patient's quality of life [2]. In case of anastomotic leakage, the ghost (or virtual) ileostomy is converted, under local anesthesia, into a loop (real) ileostomy by extracting the isolated loop through an adequate abdominal wall opening. In principle, avoiding readmission for performing the closure of the ileostomy, with all the costs related, means a considerable saving for the hospital management. Also, applying a protective rectal tube in intestinal anastomosis may have a beneficial effect [3]. These options are performed by general surgeons in oncological scenarios, but their use in endometriosis has never been described. INTERVENTIONS: In a 32-year-old woman with intense dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschesia, and cyclic rectal bleeding, a complete laparoscopic approach was performed using blunt and sharp dissection with cold scissors, bipolar dissector and a 5-mm LigaSure Advance (Covidien, Valley lab, Norwalk, Connecticut). An extensive adhesiolysis restoring the pelvic anatomy and endometriosis excision was done. Afterward, the segmental bowel resection was performed using linear and circular endo-anal stapler technique with immediate end-to-end bowel anastomosis and transit reconstitution. Once anastomosis was done, the terminal ileal loop was identified, and a window was made in the adjacent mesentery. Then, an elastic tape (vessel loop) was passed around the ileal loop, brought out of the abdomen through the right iliac fossa 5-mm port site incision and, fixed to the abdominal wall using nonabsorbable stitches. Finally, a trans-anal tube was placed for 5 days. The patient was discharged on the fifth day postoperatively without any complications. The tape was removed 10 days after surgery, and the loop dropped back. Two months after the intervention, the patient remains asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Ghost ileostomy is a simple, safe, and feasible technique available in the setting of lower colorectal anastomosis following bowel endometriosis resection.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis/surgery , Ileostomy/methods , Intestinal Diseases/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Abdominal Wall/pathology , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Adult , Anal Canal/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Anastomotic Leak , Colon, Sigmoid/surgery , Dysmenorrhea/etiology , Dysmenorrhea/surgery , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/pathology , Female , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/complications , Intestinal Diseases/pathology , Pelvis/pathology , Pelvis/surgery , Rectum/pathology , Rectum/surgery
15.
Gynecol Endocrinol ; 37(2): 157-161, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376255

ABSTRACT

In patients with endometriosis, ectopic endometrial tissues can escape from immune system control and survive in other tissues. The pathophysiology of endometriosis is still not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of endometriosis, which is thought to be a benign but infiltrative cancer type, which has many similarities with cancer biology by determining PD-1 expression in patients with endometriosis. In this study, n = 73 cases who underwent surgery or examination at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic of Sivas Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine and diagnosed as endometriosis in the biopsy material taken with the pre-diagnosis of endometriosis constituted the patient group. The control group consisted of n = 64 healthy subjects without concomitant malignancy or chronic inflammatory disease. Venous whole blood samples were obtained from the study groups. PD-1 and PD-L1 levels were determined by the ELISA method from serum and plasma samples. PD-1 gene expression level was determined by RT-PCR. The PD-1 level was found to be approximately 350 ± 150 ng/L and 45 ± 17 ng/L in endometriosis and control group, respectively. While the PD-L1 level was approximately 760 ± 108 ng/L in the patients, this level was 140 ± 14 ng/L in the controls. According to the RT-PCR results, the expression of the PD-1 gene 10 times higher compared to the controls. Conclusion: The identified increase of PD-1 levels and gene expression in endometriosis groups show that immunotherapy may be used in the treatment of endometriosis.


Subject(s)
B7-H1 Antigen/blood , Endometriosis/blood , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/blood , Case-Control Studies , Endometriosis/etiology , Female , Humans
16.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256433, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a chronic pain condition in premenopausal women. Pain is mainly characterized by pain intensity and may induce disability in all areas of daily life. Nevertheless, pain is influenced by emotional and social factors as well. Social distancing measures or quarantine, as reaction to rapidly rising infections with the COVID-19 virus due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, were implemented across Europe to prevent the spread of the virus and social distancing measures were imposed by the German government by beginning of March 2020 with initiation of the lockdown by the end of March 2020. The objective of this study was to assess, how social distancing measures during the lockdown impacted the various aspects of pain perception in a group of chronic pain patients, such as women suffering from endometriosis. METHODS: Between 6th to 27th April 2020, an online questionnaire was activated at internet platforms of endometriosis patients support groups. Participants were asked retrospectively at one time point about their visual pain intensity measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) and pain disability via pain disability index (PDI) prior to initiation of social distancing measures in Germany (VASP, PDIP), as well as the pain intensity and pain disability since implementation of social distancing measures (VASI, PDII). Differences of VAS and PDI previous and after implementation of social distancing measures were displayed as ΔVAS and ΔPDI. Pain experience and social support were assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: 285 participants completed at least one question regarding pain intensity, disability, pain experience or social support. Dysmenorrhea, the symptom with the highest level of pain assessed by VAS, decreased significantly during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic compared to the time period prior to social isolation (45.30% respondents experienced improvemenet vs 40.50% who experienced worsening; p = 0.025). The global physical impairment improved significantly (improvement of pain induced disability in 48.20% vs 40.90% with worsening of pain symptoms; p = 0.032) after the implementation of social distancing measures. Pain experience was negatively affected by social distancing measures, since frequency of pain awareness increased in 43.6% (p<0.001) of participants and 30.0% (p<0.001) more participants experienced pain as a threat. Verbalization of pain experience was reduced in 36.6% (p = 0.001) of participants and 14.6% (p = 0.91), 21.9% (p<0.001) and 31.5% (p<0.001) of participants reported less social support from their partner, family and friends. CONCLUSIONS: Physical pain and disability on one hand and emotional and social pain experience on the other were differentially affected by the emerged emotional, social and health care constraints related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Endometriosis/pathology , Social Support , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Endometriosis/complications , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Pain Measurement , Pain Perception , Pandemics , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Reprod Biomed Online ; 43(4): 747-755, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361530

ABSTRACT

RESEARCH QUESTION: How do infertility patients, endometriosis patients and health-care providers rate virtual care as an alternative to physical consultations during the first lockdown of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Netherlands, and how does this influence quality of life and quality of care? DESIGN: Infertility patients and endometriosis patients from a university hospital and members of national patient organizations, as well as healthcare providers in infertility and endometriosis care, were asked to participate between May and October 2020. The distributed online questionnaires consisted of an appraisal of virtual care and an assessment of fertility-related quality of life (FertiQol) and patient-centredness of endometriosis care (ENDOCARE). RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned by 330 infertility patients, 181 endometriosis patients and 101 healthcare providers. Of these, 75.9% of infertility patients, 64.8% of endometriosis patients and 80% of healthcare providers rated telephone consultations as a good alternative to physical consultations during the COVID-19-pandemic. Only 21.3%, 14.8% and 19.2% of the three groups rated telephone consultations as a good replacement for physical consultations in the future. A total of 76.6% and 35.9% of the infertility and endometriosis patients reported increased levels of stress during the pandemic. Infertility patients scored lower on the FertiQol, while the ENDOCARE results care seem comparable to the reference population. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual care seems to be a good alternative for infertility and endometriosis patients in circumstances where physical consultations are not possible. Self-reported stress is especially high in infertility patients during the COVID-19-pandemic. Healthcare providers should aim to improve their patients' ability to cope.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Endometriosis/therapy , Infertility/therapy , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endometriosis/psychology , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Infertility/psychology , Netherlands/epidemiology , Patient-Centered Care , Quality of Health Care , Quality of Life , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
18.
Reprod Sci ; 29(2): 620-626, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345228

ABSTRACT

The Pre-IVF Treatment with a GnRH Antagonist in Women with Endometriosis (PREGnant) Trial (clinicaltrials.gov no. NCT04173169) was designed to test the hypothesis that 60-day pre-treatment with an oral GnRH antagonist in women with documented endometriosis and planning an IVF cycle will result in a superior live birth rate to placebo. Eight hundred fourteen women are required from 4 national sites. To determine the feasibility of using an electronic medical record (EMR)-based strategy to recruit 204 participants at the Colorado site, we conducted a survey of women within the UCHealth system. Eligible women, identified using relevant ICD-10 codes, were invited to complete a 6-question survey to assess planned utilization of IVF, potential interest in participation, and whether delays in treatment due to COVID-19 would influence their decision to participate. Of 6354 age-eligible women with an endometriosis diagnosis, 421 had a concurrent infertility diagnosis. After eliminating duplicates, 212 were emailed a survey; 76 (36%) responded, 6 of whom reported no endometriosis diagnosis. Of the remaining 70, 29 (41%) were planning fertility treatment; only 19 planned IVF. All 19 expressed interest in participation. COVID-19 delays in treatment were not considered as a factor affecting participation by 8/19; the remaining 11 felt that it would "somewhat" affect their decision. None reported that they would not consider participation because of COVID-19. EMR-based recruitment for an endometriosis clinical trial is feasible although the overall yield of participants is low. Delays in treatment due to COVID-19 did not appear to overly influence potential recruitment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis/therapy , Fertility Agents, Female/therapeutic use , Fertilization in Vitro , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hormone Antagonists/therapeutic use , Infertility, Female/therapy , Patient Selection , Research Subjects/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Choice Behavior , Double-Blind Method , Electronic Health Records , Endometriosis/diagnosis , Endometriosis/physiopathology , Female , Fertility Agents, Female/adverse effects , Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone/antagonists & inhibitors , Hormone Antagonists/adverse effects , Humans , Infertility, Female/diagnosis , Infertility, Female/physiopathology , Live Birth , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Treatment Outcome , United States , Young Adult
19.
J Psychosom Res ; 146: 110508, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions and social isolation measures, which carry mental health risks. Cancellation of surgery and appointments, medication shortages and fear of the virus itself may have further challenged wellbeing. We aimed to understand how COVID-19 has affected people with endometriosis. METHODS: Using a mixed methods design, we examined; 1) the impact of COVID-19 on endometriosis related healthcare, symptoms and functioning; and 2) the relationship between a measure of fear of COVID-19 and qualitative impact in 162 women with endometriosis. RESULTS: We found that 60% of women reported impact of the pandemic upon healthcare, with sub-themes documenting the difficulty of cancelled and delayed treatment, specific COVID-19 barriers, and the advantages and disadvantages of telehealth. Only 23% reported negative impact on symptoms, specifically stress; 76% reported impact on daily functioning, with sub-themes related to compromised work, social life and healthy living. A 'hidden benefits' theme revealed ways that COVID-19 had improved some women's lives, including working from home, and the opportunity for healthy lifestyle choices. Logistic regressions revealed that fear of COVID-19 significantly predicted impact themes (healthcare odds ratio = 0.93, 95% confidence interval: 0.87-0.98; symptoms odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.82-0.95; functioning odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.85-0.99). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate the need to provide patients with supportive care during pandemic restrictions that leverage self-management strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Endometriosis/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 47(4): 1243-1252, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175089

ABSTRACT

AIM: The scar of cesarean section (CS) is the most common site of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE), whose tumor degeneration has been reported in an increasing number of cases; the most frequent histological type is clear cell carcinoma (CCC). METHODS: We conducted a systematic research of the literature, collecting data regarding the evidence on tumor degeneration from AWE after CS. Moreover, we reported a case of clear cell borderline tumor (CCBT) originating from AWE. RESULTS: We included data of 37 patients with diagnosis of CCC. The average time between the last CS and the diagnosis of CCC was around 15 years. Overall, 26.0% and 73.9% patients received exclusive local abdominal resection of the lesion and additional surgery, respectively. Lymph nodes involvement was detected in 26.0 % patients and adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 52.0 % cases. During follow-up period, 15.2% patients died of disease, 32.6% had no evidence of disease, and 17.4% recurred. We diagnosed a CCBT arose in a patients with AWE and a personal history of several surgical procedures for endometriosis, a CS and a subsequent transverse laparotomy. We performed an open bilateral ovariectomy and a large excision of the endometriotic abdominal lesion. CONCLUSION: Tumor degeneration from AWE seems to be a real occurrence with an increasing number of events. Considering the lack of risk factors and diagnostic instruments for tumor degeneration, the removal of AWE localization could be advisable, even though there was long average time between the trigger surgery and the tumor finding.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , Endometriosis , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Cesarean Section/adverse effects , Cicatrix/pathology , Endometriosis/pathology , Endometriosis/surgery , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies
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