Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(7)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785739

ABSTRACT

Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a frequently used plasticizer that may be linked to the development of endometriosis, a common gynecological disorder with a profound impact on quality of life. Despite its prevalence, vital access to treatment has often been hampered by a lack of understanding of its pathogenesis as well as reliable disease models. Recently, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been suggested to have a significant role in endometriosis pathophysiology. In this study, we found that DEHP treatment enhanced proliferation, migration, and inflammatory responses, along with EMT and stemness induction in human endometrial and endometriotic cells. The selective transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) receptor type 1/2 inhibitor LY2109761 reversed the DEHP-induced cell proliferation and migration enhancement as well as the increased expression of crucial molecules involved in inflammation, EMT, and stemness, indicating that DEHP-triggered phenomena occur via the TGF-ß/Smad signaling pathway. Our study clearly defines the role of DEHP in the etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of endometriosis and establishes an efficient disease model for endometriosis using a biomimetic 3D cell culture technique. Altogether, our data provide novel etiological and mechanistic insights into the role of DEHP in endometriosis pathogenesis, opening avenues for developing novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Diethylhexyl Phthalate , Endometriosis , Cell Proliferation , Diethylhexyl Phthalate/metabolism , Diethylhexyl Phthalate/toxicity , Endometriosis/pathology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Female , Humans , Phthalic Acids , Quality of Life , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factors/metabolism
2.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 27(5): 1014-1016, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate our application of the ghost ileostomy in the setting of laparoscopic segmental bowel resection for symptomatic bowel endometriosis nodule. DESIGN: Technical step-by-step surgical video description (educative video) SETTING: University Tertiary Hospital. Institutional Review Board ruled that approval was not required for this study. Endometriosis affects the bowel in 3% to 37% of all cases, and in 90% of these cases, the rectum or sigmoid colon is also involved. Infiltration up to the rectal mucosa and invasion of >50% of the circumference have been suggested as an indication for bowel resection [1]. Apart from general risks (bleeding, infection, direct organ injuries) and bowel and bladder dysfunctions, anastomotic leakage is one of the most severe complications. In women with bowel and vaginal mucosa endometriosis involvement, there is a risk of rectovaginal fistula after concomitant rectum and vagina resections. Hence, for lower colorectal anastomosis, the use of temporary protective ileostomy is usually recommended to prevent these complications but carries on stoma-related risks, such as hernia, retraction, dehydration, prolapse, and necrosis. Ghost ileostomy is a specific technique, first described in 2010, that gives an easy and safe option to prevent anastomotic leakage with maximum preservation of the patient's quality of life [2]. In case of anastomotic leakage, the ghost (or virtual) ileostomy is converted, under local anesthesia, into a loop (real) ileostomy by extracting the isolated loop through an adequate abdominal wall opening. In principle, avoiding readmission for performing the closure of the ileostomy, with all the costs related, means a considerable saving for the hospital management. Also, applying a protective rectal tube in intestinal anastomosis may have a beneficial effect [3]. These options are performed by general surgeons in oncological scenarios, but their use in endometriosis has never been described. INTERVENTIONS: In a 32-year-old woman with intense dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschesia, and cyclic rectal bleeding, a complete laparoscopic approach was performed using blunt and sharp dissection with cold scissors, bipolar dissector and a 5-mm LigaSure Advance (Covidien, Valley lab, Norwalk, Connecticut). An extensive adhesiolysis restoring the pelvic anatomy and endometriosis excision was done. Afterward, the segmental bowel resection was performed using linear and circular endo-anal stapler technique with immediate end-to-end bowel anastomosis and transit reconstitution. Once anastomosis was done, the terminal ileal loop was identified, and a window was made in the adjacent mesentery. Then, an elastic tape (vessel loop) was passed around the ileal loop, brought out of the abdomen through the right iliac fossa 5-mm port site incision and, fixed to the abdominal wall using nonabsorbable stitches. Finally, a trans-anal tube was placed for 5 days. The patient was discharged on the fifth day postoperatively without any complications. The tape was removed 10 days after surgery, and the loop dropped back. Two months after the intervention, the patient remains asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Ghost ileostomy is a simple, safe, and feasible technique available in the setting of lower colorectal anastomosis following bowel endometriosis resection.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis/surgery , Ileostomy/methods , Intestinal Diseases/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Abdominal Wall/pathology , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Adult , Anal Canal/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Anastomotic Leak , Colon, Sigmoid/surgery , Dysmenorrhea/etiology , Dysmenorrhea/surgery , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/pathology , Female , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/complications , Intestinal Diseases/pathology , Pelvis/pathology , Pelvis/surgery , Rectum/pathology , Rectum/surgery
3.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256433, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a chronic pain condition in premenopausal women. Pain is mainly characterized by pain intensity and may induce disability in all areas of daily life. Nevertheless, pain is influenced by emotional and social factors as well. Social distancing measures or quarantine, as reaction to rapidly rising infections with the COVID-19 virus due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, were implemented across Europe to prevent the spread of the virus and social distancing measures were imposed by the German government by beginning of March 2020 with initiation of the lockdown by the end of March 2020. The objective of this study was to assess, how social distancing measures during the lockdown impacted the various aspects of pain perception in a group of chronic pain patients, such as women suffering from endometriosis. METHODS: Between 6th to 27th April 2020, an online questionnaire was activated at internet platforms of endometriosis patients support groups. Participants were asked retrospectively at one time point about their visual pain intensity measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) and pain disability via pain disability index (PDI) prior to initiation of social distancing measures in Germany (VASP, PDIP), as well as the pain intensity and pain disability since implementation of social distancing measures (VASI, PDII). Differences of VAS and PDI previous and after implementation of social distancing measures were displayed as ΔVAS and ΔPDI. Pain experience and social support were assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: 285 participants completed at least one question regarding pain intensity, disability, pain experience or social support. Dysmenorrhea, the symptom with the highest level of pain assessed by VAS, decreased significantly during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic compared to the time period prior to social isolation (45.30% respondents experienced improvemenet vs 40.50% who experienced worsening; p = 0.025). The global physical impairment improved significantly (improvement of pain induced disability in 48.20% vs 40.90% with worsening of pain symptoms; p = 0.032) after the implementation of social distancing measures. Pain experience was negatively affected by social distancing measures, since frequency of pain awareness increased in 43.6% (p<0.001) of participants and 30.0% (p<0.001) more participants experienced pain as a threat. Verbalization of pain experience was reduced in 36.6% (p = 0.001) of participants and 14.6% (p = 0.91), 21.9% (p<0.001) and 31.5% (p<0.001) of participants reported less social support from their partner, family and friends. CONCLUSIONS: Physical pain and disability on one hand and emotional and social pain experience on the other were differentially affected by the emerged emotional, social and health care constraints related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Endometriosis/pathology , Social Support , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Endometriosis/complications , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Pain Measurement , Pain Perception , Pandemics , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 47(4): 1243-1252, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175089

ABSTRACT

AIM: The scar of cesarean section (CS) is the most common site of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE), whose tumor degeneration has been reported in an increasing number of cases; the most frequent histological type is clear cell carcinoma (CCC). METHODS: We conducted a systematic research of the literature, collecting data regarding the evidence on tumor degeneration from AWE after CS. Moreover, we reported a case of clear cell borderline tumor (CCBT) originating from AWE. RESULTS: We included data of 37 patients with diagnosis of CCC. The average time between the last CS and the diagnosis of CCC was around 15 years. Overall, 26.0% and 73.9% patients received exclusive local abdominal resection of the lesion and additional surgery, respectively. Lymph nodes involvement was detected in 26.0 % patients and adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 52.0 % cases. During follow-up period, 15.2% patients died of disease, 32.6% had no evidence of disease, and 17.4% recurred. We diagnosed a CCBT arose in a patients with AWE and a personal history of several surgical procedures for endometriosis, a CS and a subsequent transverse laparotomy. We performed an open bilateral ovariectomy and a large excision of the endometriotic abdominal lesion. CONCLUSION: Tumor degeneration from AWE seems to be a real occurrence with an increasing number of events. Considering the lack of risk factors and diagnostic instruments for tumor degeneration, the removal of AWE localization could be advisable, even though there was long average time between the trigger surgery and the tumor finding.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , Endometriosis , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Cesarean Section/adverse effects , Cicatrix/pathology , Endometriosis/pathology , Endometriosis/surgery , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL