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2.
J Craniofac Surg ; 34(3): 1089-1092, 2023 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317907

ABSTRACT

Endonasal endoscopic approaches are the most preferred surgical methods in patients with pseudotumor cerebri because of easy access to the optic nerve, but the choice of this technique may not apply to all endoscopic endonasal cases. Moreover, there may be difficulties in practice in some cases, including the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. This study aimed to suggest an alternative endoscopic approach by lateral orbitotomy for optic nerve decompression in patients with pseudotumor cerebri. The study was performed using 5 fresh-frozen cadaver heads (bilaterally, total of 10 sides) injected intravenously with colored silicone preserved in the cold chain. An average of 2.5 cm skin incision was made to fit the lateral orbitotomy. The lengths of the recurrent meningeal artery (mm), the meningo-orbital band (mm), and the optic nerve (mm) to the orbital margin were measured. After these morphometric measurements, optic nerve decompression was performed endoscopically, and the length of the decompression was measured (mm). The average length (mm) between the orbital rim and meningeal recurrent artery (or meningolacrimal branch) was 16.2 mm, between the orbital rim and the meningo-orbital band was 18.5 mm, and between the orbital rim and optic nerve was 44.1 mm. The average optic nerve decompression length was 4.4 mm. The endoscopic lateral orbitotomy approach provides easy access to the optic nerve by anatomically following the recurrent meningeal artery and the meningo-orbital band. It can be a safe second-line approach after endonasal approaches for optic nerve decompression in pseudotumor cerebri.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pseudotumor Cerebri , Humans , Pseudotumor Cerebri/surgery , Endoscopy/methods , Optic Nerve/surgery , Decompression, Surgical/methods
3.
Comput Biol Med ; 159: 106847, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304356

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) and the hybrid models of CNNs and Vision Transformers (VITs) are the recent mainstream methods for COVID-19 medical image diagnosis. However, pure CNNs lack global modeling ability, and the hybrid models of CNNs and VITs have problems such as large parameters and computational complexity. These models are difficult to be used effectively for medical diagnosis in just-in-time applications. METHODS: Therefore, a lightweight medical diagnosis network CTMLP based on convolutions and multi-layer perceptrons (MLPs) is proposed for the diagnosis of COVID-19. The previous self-supervised algorithms are based on CNNs and VITs, and the effectiveness of such algorithms for MLPs is not yet known. At the same time, due to the lack of ImageNet-scale datasets in the medical image domain for model pre-training. So, a pre-training scheme TL-DeCo based on transfer learning and self-supervised learning was constructed. In addition, TL-DeCo is too tedious and resource-consuming to build a new model each time. Therefore, a guided self-supervised pre-training scheme was constructed for the new lightweight model pre-training. RESULTS: The proposed CTMLP achieves an accuracy of 97.51%, an f1-score of 97.43%, and a recall of 98.91% without pre-training, even with only 48% of the number of ResNet50 parameters. Furthermore, the proposed guided self-supervised learning scheme can improve the baseline of simple self-supervised learning by 1%-1.27%. CONCLUSION: The final results show that the proposed CTMLP can replace CNNs or Transformers for a more efficient diagnosis of COVID-19. In addition, the additional pre-training framework was developed to make it more promising in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Neural Networks, Computer , Algorithms , Endoscopy
4.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(Suppl 4): 74, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283715
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 27(4): 1360-1366, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280562

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, people's admissions to the hospital for their current illness were delayed. We aimed to reveal how this situation has affected the endoscopic treatment of ureteral stones. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who were treated for 59 endoscopic ureteral stones in the pre-pandemic period between September 2019 and December 2019, and patients who were treated for 60 endoscopic ureteral stones between January 2022 and April 2022, when the effectiveness of the COVID-19 pandemic decreased, were evaluated in two groups. Pre-pandemic patients were classified as group 1, and patients treated during the period when the effectiveness of the pandemic decreased as group 2. The patients' ages, preoperative laboratory examinations and radiological findings, localization and size of the stones in the ureter, time until the operation, duration of the operation, length of hospital stay, preoperative ESWL history, complication rates according to the Modified Clavien classification were evaluated. The problems observed in the ureter during the operation were examined separately as edema, polyp formation in the ureter, distal ureteral stenosis, and adhesion of the stone to the mucosa. RESULTS: In group 1, 9 patients were female and 50 were male, with a mean age of 42.19 ± 14.06 years; in group 2, 17 patients were female and 43 were male, with a mean age of 45.23 ± 12.20 years. The stone size was found to be higher in group 2. Group 1 had more patients who did not develop complications in the Modified Clavien classification, and the proportion of group 2 patients in the grade I-II-IIIA-IIIB classification was higher. Considering the waiting time before hospitalization, it was determined that the rate of group 2 patients was higher in those with a waiting period of 31-60 days (33.9-48.3%) and ≥60 days (10.2-21.7%). Except for the development of ureteral polyps, all other problems rate were found to be higher in group 2 patients compared to group 1. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a delay in the treatment of ureteral stones in patients. In the next period, as a result of this delay, negative effects on the ureteral mucosa were detected and, accordingly, an increase in the complication rates of the operation was observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ureter , Humans , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Endoscopy , Hospitalization
6.
Dig Dis Sci ; 68(6): 2303-2314, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After COVID-19 restrictions on nonessential procedures were lifted and safety protocols established, utilization rates of endoscopic procedures remained reduced. AIMS: This study assessed patient attitudes and barriers to scheduling endoscopy during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was administered to patients with ordered procedures at a hospital-based setting (7/21/2020-2/19/2021) collecting demographic data, body mass index, COVID-19 relevant comorbidities, level of procedural urgency (defined by recommended scheduling window), scheduling and attendance, concerns, and awareness of safety measures. RESULTS: The average respondent was female (63.8%), age 57.6 ± 14, White (72.3%), married (76.7%), insured (99.3%), affluent English speakers (92.3%) and highly educated (at least college 90.2%). Most reported moderate to excellent COVID-19 knowledge (96.6%). Of 1039 procedures scheduled, emergent cases accounted for 5.1%, urgent 55.3% and elective 39.4%. Respondents identified appointment convenience (48.53%) as the most frequent factor impacting scheduling, also noting concern for results (28.4%). Age (p = .022), native language (p = .04), education (p = .007), self-reported COVID knowledge (p = .002), and a desire to be COVID tested pre-procedure (p = .023) were associated with arrival, more commonly in an ambulatory surgical center than hospital (p = .008). Diabetes mellitus (p = .004) and an immunocompromised state (p = .009) were adversely related to attendance. Attitudes towards safety protocols did not affect scheduling. Multivariate analysis demonstrated age, education and COVID knowledgeability were associated with procedure completion. CONCLUSIONS: Safety protocols and urgency levels were not associated with procedure completion. Pre-pandemic barriers to endoscopy persisted as dominant factors amid pandemic concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Endoscopy , Appointments and Schedules , Ambulatory Care Facilities
7.
Rhinology ; 61(2): 170-179, 2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2235227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 and other respiratory infections spread through aerosols produced in respiratory activities and in certain surgical procedures considered as aerosol-generating procedures (AGP). Due to manipulation of the upper airway mucosa, rhinosurgery has been considered a particular risk for spread of respiratory infections. Our aim was to assess staff exposure to aerosols during common rhinosurgical procedures METHODS: Staff exposure to generated particle concentrations and size distributions between 0.3 λm and 10 λm were measured during rhinosurgery using an optical particle sizer without any additional collection methods. Similarly measured aerosol exposure during coughing (a commonly used risk reference for aerosol generation) and the operating room’s background concentration were chosen as reference values. RESULTS: Altogether 16 common rhinological surgeries (septoplasties and endoscopic sinus surgery) were measured. The use of suction produced significantly lower aerosol concentration compared to coughing. Low aerosol generation was observed during injection anaesthesia of the nasal mucosa. Instrument comparison revealed that the microdebrider produced fewer aerosols than cold dissection in particles of 1-5 λm and >5 λm. CONCLUSIONS: Common rhinosurgeries do not seem to generate as high aerosol concentration exposures as previously believed. Rather, the observed aerosol exposure is lower or similar to exposures during coughing. Therefore, the classification of common rhinosurgeries as AGPs should be re-assessed or possibly discarded.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Respiratory Aerosols and Droplets , Endoscopy , Nose
8.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060290, 2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2213946

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute variceal haemorrhage (AVH) in patients with cirrhosis remains a topic of great interest. Although several guidelines recommend endoscopy within 24 hours after AVH, there is no consensus on the most appropriate time to perform this intervention. The purpose of this study is to identify whether urgent endoscopy (within 6 hours after gastroenterological consultation) is superior to non-urgent endoscopy (between 6 hours and 24 hours after gastroenterological consultation) in reducing the rebleeding rate of these patients. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a single-centred, prospective, randomised clinical trial. Between March 2021 and December 2023, an estimated 400 patients will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive endoscopic intervention either within 6 hours or between 6 and 24 hours after gastroenterological consultation. Randomisation will be conducted by permuted block randomisation, with stratification by age, systolic blood pressure and pulse rate. The primary efficacy endpoint is rebleeding within 42 days after control of AVH. The secondary efficacy endpoints mainly include all-cause mortality within 42 days after randomisation, persistent bleeding, length of hospitalisation, etc. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol was approved by the Ethical Committees of Jinling Hospital (authorised ethics no. DZQH-KYLL-21-01). This trial will provide valuable insights into the timing of endoscopic intervention for AVH in patients with cirrhosis. Furthermore, the trial results and conclusions could provide high-quality evidence to guide clinical research and treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04786743.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Hemorrhage/complications , Endoscopy , Treatment Outcome , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
9.
J. coloproctol. (Rio J., Impr.) ; 42(4): 327-334, Oct.-Dec. 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2186467

ABSTRACT

The SARS-Cov-2 pandemic and its immediate public health impact has caused severe disruption of regular medical care provision. The morbimortality of other diseases continues to affect people regardless of the viral infection. Indeed, it would be reasonable to assume that they have been aggravated by the period of most restrictive public health measures that were adopted against the virus. Recovery and maintenance of healthcare provision is required despite the ongoing threat. Therefore, it is critical to resume services in a structured and safe way, otherwise greater harm could come to our patients and to ourselves. The present article proposes to be a broad guide to the recovery and maintenance of elective outpatient, surgical and lower endoscopic services, aiding the colorectal surgeon in identifying risks, assessing their multiple dimensions, and implementing risk management strategies in a pragmatic and efficacious way. (AU)


A pandemia de SARS-Cov-2 e suas imediatas consequências para a saúde coletiva causaram enormes restrições ao atendimento médico-hospitalar normal. A despeito disso, os riscos de morbimortalidade relacionados a outras doenças e agravos à saúde são incessantes. E é razoável de presumi-los como aumentados pela falta de atendimento regular no período restrições mais severas decorrentes das medidas sanitárias contra a epidemia. A retomada do atendimento é necessária, ainda que o vírus permaneça uma ameaça. Portanto, é crítico que esta seja feita de forma estruturada e segura, sob pena de causar mal adicional aos nossos pacientes e a nós mesmos. O presente artigo se propõe a servir como guia para a retomada e manutenção dos atendimentos eletivos ambulatorial, cirúrgico e endoscópico baixo, auxiliando o coloproctologista a identificar os riscos, avaliar a suas dimensões e implementar medidas de controle de forma pragmática e eficaz. (AU)


Subject(s)
Elective Surgical Procedures , Colorectal Surgery , COVID-19 , Risk Management , Endoscopy , Waiting Rooms
10.
Ear Nose Throat J ; 101(10_suppl): 40S-43S, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162155

ABSTRACT

Internal maxillary artery (IMA) pseudoaneurysms are rare, and typically occur following trauma or orthognathic surgery. Pseudoaneurysms are life-threatening conditions, and expeditious workup and treatment is critical. Endoscopic treatment of an IMA pseudoaneurysm is a feasible option and should be considered when IR embolization is not available. The objective of this study is to review the literature on IMA pseudoaneurysms and present the first reported case of an IMA pseudoaneurysm successfully treated endoscopically.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, False , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Maxillary Artery , Aneurysm, False/diagnostic imaging , Aneurysm, False/etiology , Aneurysm, False/surgery , Endoscopy
11.
Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol ; 46(10): 102049, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104585

ABSTRACT

Acute appendicitis is a common abdominal surgical emergency worldwide. Abraham Groves performed the first documented open appendectomy in 1883. Although appendectomy is still the most effective treatment in cases of acute appendicitis, it causes a range of complications and carries the risk of negative appendectomy. In the awake of covid-19, the latest guidelines recommend antibiotic therapy as an acceptable first line treatment for acute appendicitis. However, patients treated with antibiotics have a recurrence risk of up to 30% at 1 year. Endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy (ERAT) has emerged as promising non-invasive treatment modality for acute uncomplicated appendicitis (AUA) which involves cannulation, appedicography, appendiceal stone extraction, appendiceal lumen irrigation, and stent insertion. ERAT aims to relieve the cause of appendicitis (e.g., obstruction or stenosis of the appendiceal lumen) and thus effectively prevent the recurrence of appendicitis. In addition, it can make a definitive diagnosis of acute appendicitis during endoscopic retrograde appendicography. Studies have shown that 93.8 to 95% of AUA patients did not have a recurrence following ERAT. In this study, we aim to summarize the current body of evidence on ERAT to situate it alongside currently established therapies for acute appendicitis, in particular, AUA.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Humans , Appendicitis/drug therapy , Appendicitis/surgery , Acute Disease , Appendectomy , Endoscopy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
13.
Surg Endosc ; 34(10): 4225-4232, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and general surgeons are being challenged by the current pandemic. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) aimed to evaluate surgeons' experiences and perspectives, to identify gaps in knowledge, to record shortcomings in resources and to register research priorities. METHODS: An ad hoc web-based survey of EAES members and affiliates was developed by the EAES Research Committee. The questionnaire consisted of 69 items divided into the following sections: (Ι) demographics, (II) institutional burdens and management strategies, and (III) analysis of resource, knowledge, and evidence gaps. Descriptive statistics were summarized as frequencies, medians, ranges,, and interquartile ranges, as appropriate. RESULTS: The survey took place between March 25th and April 16th with a total of 550 surgeons from 79 countries. Eighty-one percent had to postpone elective cases or suspend their practice and 35% assumed roles not related to their primary expertise. One-fourth of respondents reported having encountered abdominal pathologies in COVID-19-positive patients, most frequently acute appendicitis (47% of respondents). The effect of protective measures in surgical or endoscopic procedures on infected patients, the effect of endoscopic surgery on infected patients, and the infectivity of positive patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were prioritized as knowledge gaps and research priorities. CONCLUSIONS: Perspectives and priorities of EAES members in the era of the pandemic are hereto summarized. Research evidence is urgently needed to effectively respond to challenges arisen from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biomedical Research , Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Europe , Health Care Rationing/methods , Health Care Rationing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Surg Endosc ; 36(Suppl 2): 325-674, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2003720

Subject(s)
Endoscopy , Humans , Spain
16.
Curr Opin Gastroenterol ; 38(5): 429, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997091
17.
Otol Neurotol ; 43(8): e856-e860, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992396

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Cerebrospinal fluid leak and pneumocephalus are rare but potentially devastating complications associated with translabyrinthine resection of cerebellopontine angle masses. Persistent pneumocephalus despite proximal eustachian tube (ET) obliteration is rare. We describe, to our knowledge, the first report of successful management of tension pneumocephalus by endoscopic endonasal ET obliteration using a novel V-loc (Covidien; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) suture technique. PATIENTS: A 63-year-old man presented with altered mental status 10 months after translabyrinthine excision of a left cerebellopontine angle vestibular schwannoma measuring 2.8 × 2.9 × 3.3 cm. Computed tomography demonstrated diffuse ventriculomegaly and new pneumocephalus along the right frontal lobe, lateral ventricles, and third ventricle, and air within the left translabyrinthine resection cavity. INTERVENTION: The patient underwent left-sided endoscopic endonasal ET obliteration using 2-0, 9-inch V-loc suture. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Postoperatively, the patient's mental status improved with a decrease in size of the lateral and third ventricles on computed tomography. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic endonasal ET obliteration, a technique previously applied to recalcitrant cerebrospinal fluid leaks, is a safe and reasonable alternative to reentering the original surgical site for patients with pneumocephalus after lateral skull base surgery. Utilizing a V-loc suture for this technique instead of a traditional suture may improve procedural ease and speed.


Subject(s)
Eustachian Tube , Neuroma, Acoustic , Pneumocephalus , Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/etiology , Endoscopy/methods , Eustachian Tube/surgery , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroma, Acoustic/complications , Neuroma, Acoustic/surgery , Pneumocephalus/diagnostic imaging , Pneumocephalus/etiology , Pneumocephalus/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology
18.
Gastrointest Endosc ; 92(4): 987-988, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382380
19.
J Craniomaxillofac Surg ; 50(9): 692-698, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966818

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to review different approaches and outcomes in the management of post-COVID-19 frontal sinus fungal osteomyelitis. The study included 19 patients with frontal sinus fungal osteomyelitis. The main line of treatment was surgical debridement (sequestrectomy). Approaches included combined external and endoscopic approaches (n = 15) and pure endoscopic approaches (n = 4) according to the extent and accessibility of the sequestrum. Postoperative healing was satisfactory in all patients. All patients returned to their normal daily activity within 4-6 weeks, without residual or recurrent frontal sinus infection, osteomyelitis or need for revision procedures. Within the limitation of this case series, it seems that there is no need to adopt a new therapy regimen for treatment of frontal sinus fungal osteomyelitis because the conventional and well-known treatment approach combining surgery and antifungal drugs seems to work well. However, early, and adequate debridement and sequestrectomy is crucial. Furthermore, an open approach may be required according to the extent of osteomyelitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frontal Sinus , Frontal Sinusitis , Osteomyelitis , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Endoscopy , Frontal Sinus/surgery , Frontal Sinusitis/complications , Frontal Sinusitis/surgery , Humans , Osteomyelitis/surgery
20.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 29(3): 213-218, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956625

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Videofluoroscopy (VFSS) and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) are established instrumental techniques to support differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Whilst their value is undisputed, each tool is not without limitations. The COVID-19 pandemic has restricted access to VFSS and FEES leading clinicians to explore alternative or augmentative tools to support swallowing assessment.Ultrasound (US) is an established tool for visualisation of head and neck anatomy, including structures implicated in swallowing. Although US has been utilised in swallowing research for many years, its application has not translated into common clinical practice. This review presents and debates the evidence for and against use of US for clinical swallowing assessment. RECENT FINDINGS: Evaluation of swallowing muscle morphometry and measurement of isolated swallowing kinematics are two primary uses of US in swallowing assessment that have been identified in the literature. Use of US to detect bolus flow, aspiration and residues is in its early stages and needs further research. SUMMARY: US shows promise as an adjunctive modality to support assessment of swallowing. With standardisation, these measurements may have potential for transition into clinical care. Reliability and validity testing and development of normative data are imperative to ensure its use as an evidence-based instrumentation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Deglutition Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Endoscopy , Ultrasonography , Video Recording , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Deglutition Disorders/etiology , Deglutition Disorders/therapy , Humans , Infection Control , Reproducibility of Results
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