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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736936

ABSTRACT

The endothelium is the inner layer of all blood vessels and it regulates hemostasis. It also plays an active role in the regulation of the systemic inflammatory response. Systemic inflammatory disease often results in alterations in vascular endothelium barrier function, increased permeability, excessive leukocyte trafficking, and reactive oxygen species production, leading to organ damage. Therapeutics targeting endothelium inflammation are urgently needed, but strong concerns regarding the level of phenotypic heterogeneity of microvascular endothelial cells between different organs and species have been expressed. Microvascular endothelial cell heterogeneity in different organs and organ-specific variations in endothelial cell structure and function are regulated by intrinsic signals that are differentially expressed across organs and species; a result of this is that neutrophil recruitment to discrete organs may be regulated differently. In this review, we will discuss the morphological and functional variations in differently originated microvascular endothelia and discuss how these variances affect systemic function in response to inflammation. We will review emerging in vivo and in vitro models and techniques, including microphysiological devices, proteomics, and RNA sequencing used to study the cellular and molecular heterogeneity of endothelia from different organs. A better understanding of microvascular endothelial cell heterogeneity will provide a roadmap for developing novel therapeutics to target the endothelium.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Animals , Humans
2.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 197: 114909, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616378

ABSTRACT

Vascular endothelial cells are major participants in and regulators of immune responses and inflammation. Vascular endotheliitis is regarded as a host immune-inflammatory response of the endothelium forming the inner surface of blood vessels in association with a direct consequence of infectious pathogen invasion. Vascular endotheliitis and consequent endothelial dysfunction can be a principle determinant of microvascular failure, which would favor impaired perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and subsequent organ failure. Emerging evidence suggests the role of vascular endotheliitis in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its related complications. Thus, once initiated, vascular endotheliitis and resultant cytokine storm cause systemic hyperinflammation and a thrombotic phenomenon in COVID-19, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome and widespread organ damage. Vascular endotheliitis also appears to be a contributory factor to vasculopathy and coagulopathy in sepsis that is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated response of the host to infection. Therefore, protecting endothelial cells and reversing vascular endotheliitis may be a leading therapeutic goal for these diseases associated with vascular endotheliitis. In this review, we outline the etiological and pathogenic importance of vascular endotheliitis in infection-related inflammatory diseases, including COVID-19, and possible mechanisms leading to vascular endotheliitis. We also discuss pharmacological agents which may be now considered as potential endotheliitis-based treatment modalities for those diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Vascular Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/etiology , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Vascular Diseases/drug therapy , Vascular Diseases/etiology , Vascular Diseases/immunology
3.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502528

ABSTRACT

Men are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), and face higher odds of severe illness and death compared to women. The vascular effects of androgen signaling and inflammatory cytokines in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)-mediated endothelial injury are not defined. We determined the effects of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-mediated endothelial injury under conditions of exposure to androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and tested potentially therapeutic effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism by spironolactone. Circulating endothelial injury markers VCAM-1 and E-selectin were measured in men and women diagnosed with COVID-19. Exposure of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro to DHT exacerbated spike protein S1-mediated endothelial injury transcripts for the cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and anti-fibrinolytic PAI-1 (p < 0.05), and increased THP-1 monocyte adhesion to ECs (p = 0.032). Spironolactone dramatically reduced DHT+S1-induced endothelial activation. TNF-α exacerbated S1-induced EC activation, which was abrogated by pretreatment with spironolactone. Analysis from patients hospitalized with COVID-19 showed concordant higher circulating VCAM-1 and E-Selectin levels in men, compared to women. A beneficial effect of the FDA-approved drug spironolactone was observed on endothelial cells in vitro, supporting a rationale for further evaluation of mineralocorticoid antagonism as an adjunct treatment in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dihydrotestosterone/pharmacology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Inflammation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Spironolactone/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/blood , Cells, Cultured , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Sex Characteristics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/physiology , Valsartan/pharmacology
4.
Pharmacol Rev ; 73(3): 924-967, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447969

ABSTRACT

The endothelium, a cellular monolayer lining the blood vessel wall, plays a critical role in maintaining multiorgan health and homeostasis. Endothelial functions in health include dynamic maintenance of vascular tone, angiogenesis, hemostasis, and the provision of an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic interface. Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium presents with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, heightened oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, leukocyte adhesion and hyperpermeability, and endothelial cell senescence. Recent studies have implicated altered endothelial cell metabolism and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as new features of endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of many diverse human panvascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction has also been implicated in severe coronavirus disease 2019. Many clinically used pharmacotherapies, ranging from traditional lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensive drugs, and antidiabetic drugs to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors and interleukin 1ß monoclonal antibodies, counter endothelial dysfunction as part of their clinical benefits. The regulation of endothelial dysfunction by noncoding RNAs has provided novel insights into these newly described regulators of endothelial dysfunction, thus yielding potential new therapeutic approaches. Altogether, a better understanding of the versatile (dys)functions of endothelial cells will not only deepen our comprehension of human diseases but also accelerate effective therapeutic drug discovery. In this review, we provide a timely overview of the multiple layers of endothelial function, describe the consequences and mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction, and identify pathways to effective targeted therapies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The endothelium was initially considered to be a semipermeable biomechanical barrier and gatekeeper of vascular health. In recent decades, a deepened understanding of the biological functions of the endothelium has led to its recognition as a ubiquitous tissue regulating vascular tone, cell behavior, innate immunity, cell-cell interactions, and cell metabolism in the vessel wall. Endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark of cardiovascular, metabolic, and emerging infectious diseases. Pharmacotherapies targeting endothelial dysfunction have potential for treatment of cardiovascular and many other diseases.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents , Cardiovascular Diseases , Endothelium, Vascular , Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/physiopathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Agents/classification , Cardiovascular Agents/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Drug Discovery , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/trends , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295525

ABSTRACT

Dexamethasone provides benefits in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although data regarding immunological profiles and viral clearance are limited. This study aimed to evaluate for differences in biomarkers among patients with severe COVID-19 who did and did not receive dexamethasone. We measured plasma biomarkers of lung epithelial/endothelial injury and inflammation in 31 patients with severe COVID-19 and in 13 controls. Changes in biomarkers and clinical parameters were compared during the 7-day period among COVID-19 patients, and also according to dexamethasone use. Thirty-two patients with severe COVID-19 who received mechanical ventilation (n = 6), high-flow nasal cannula (n = 11), and supplemental oxygen (n = 15) were analyzed. Relative to controls, patients with severe COVID-19 had significantly higher concentrations of biomarkers related to glycocalyx shedding (endocan and syndecan-1), endothelial injury (von Willebrand factor), and inflammation (soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products [sRAGE] and interleukin-6). The 7-day decreases in biomarkers of endothelial injury (angiopoietin-2 [Ang-2] and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1]) and sRAGE, but not in the biomarker of lung epithelial injury (surfactant protein D), were correlated with decreases in C-reactive protein and radiologic score at day 7. Twenty patients (63%) received dexamethasone, and the dexamethasone and non-dexamethasone groups differed in terms of disease severity. However, dexamethasone was associated marginally with increased SpO2/FiO2 and significantly with decreases in C-reactive protein and radiologic score after adjusting for baseline imbalances. Furthermore, the dexamethasone group exhibited a significant decrease in the concentrations of Ang-2, ICAM-1, soluble form of the Tie2 receptor (a biomarker of glycocalyx shedding), and sRAGE. Both groups exhibited a clinically insignificant increase in the cycle threshold value. Severe COVID-19 may be characterized by more severe endothelial injury and inflammation, and less severe lung epithelial injury. There is a possibility that dexamethasone improved severe COVID-19 and related endothelial injury without delaying viral clearance.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Inflammation/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Viremia/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/etiology , Lung Injury/blood , Lung Injury/diagnostic imaging , Lung Injury/etiology , Male , Oxygen/blood , Pilot Projects , Viral Load , Viremia/blood
7.
Expert Opin Ther Targets ; 25(6): 423-433, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281815

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Defibrotide (DF) is a polyribonucleotide with antithrombotic, pro-fibrinolytic, and anti-inflammatory effects on endothelium. These effects and the established safety of DF present DF as a strong candidate to treat viral and post-infectious syndromes involving endothelial dysfunction. AREAS COVERED: We discuss DF and other therapeutic agents that have the potential to target endothelial components of pathogenesis in viral and post-infectious syndromes. We introduce defibrotide (DF), describe its mechanisms of action, and explore its established pleiotropic effects on the endothelium. We describe the established pathophysiology of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and highlight the processes specific to COVID-19 potentially modulated by DF. We also present influenza A and viral hemorrhagic fevers, especially those caused by hantavirus, Ebola virus, and dengue virus, as viral syndromes in which DF might serve therapeutic benefit. Finally, we offer our opinion on novel treatment strategies targeting endothelial dysfunction in viral infections and their severe manifestations. EXPERT OPINION: Given the critical role of endothelial dysfunction in numerous infectious syndromes, in particular COVID-19, therapeutic pharmacology for these conditions should increasingly prioritize endothelial stabilization. Several agents with endothelial protective properties should be further studied as treatments for severe viral infections and vasculitides, especially where other therapeutic modalities have failed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Polydeoxyribonucleotides/pharmacology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Polydeoxyribonucleotides/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
8.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(8): e018624, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189969

ABSTRACT

Background Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease associated with thrombotic outcomes with coagulation and endothelial disorders. Based on that, several anticoagulation guidelines have been proposed. We aimed to determine whether anticoagulation therapy modifies the risk of developing severe COVID-19. Methods and Results Patients with COVID-19 initially admitted in medical wards of 24 French hospitals were included prospectively from February 26 to April 20, 2020. We used a Poisson regression model, Cox proportional hazard model, and matched propensity score to assess the effect of anticoagulation on outcomes (intensive care unit admission or in-hospital mortality). The study enrolled 2878 patients with COVID-19, among whom 382 (13.2%) were treated with oral anticoagulation therapy before hospitalization. After adjustment, anticoagulation therapy before hospitalization was associated with a better prognosis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.70 (95% CI, 0.55-0.88). Analyses performed using propensity score matching confirmed that anticoagulation therapy before hospitalization was associated with a better prognosis, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.43 (95% CI, 0.29-0.63) for intensive care unit admission and adjusted hazard ratio of 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61-0.98) for composite criteria intensive care unit admission or death. In contrast, therapeutic or prophylactic low- or high-dose anticoagulation started during hospitalization were not associated with any of the outcomes. Conclusions Anticoagulation therapy used before hospitalization in medical wards was associated with a better prognosis in contrast with anticoagulation initiated during hospitalization. Anticoagulation therapy introduced in early disease could better prevent COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and endotheliopathy, and lead to a better prognosis.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Early Medical Intervention/methods , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Protective Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129730

ABSTRACT

According to the World Health Organization, cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death worldwide. They may be caused by various factors or combinations of factors. Frequently, endothelial dysfunction is involved in either development of the disorder or results from it. On the other hand, the endothelium may be disordered for other reasons, e.g., due to infection, such as COVID-19. The understanding of the role and significance of the endothelium in the body has changed significantly over time-from a simple physical barrier to a complex system encompassing local and systemic regulation of numerous processes in the body. Endothelium disorders may arise from impairment of one or more signaling pathways affecting dilator or constrictor activity, including nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate activation, prostacyclin-cyclic adenosine monophosphate activation, phosphodiesterase inhibition, and potassium channel activation or intracellular calcium level inhibition. In this review, plants are summarized as sources of biologically active substances affecting the endothelium. This paper compares individual substances and mechanisms that are known to affect the endothelium, and which subsequently may cause the development of cardiovascular disorders.


Subject(s)
Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/physiology , Plants/chemistry , Secondary Metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/cytology , Humans , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plants/metabolism , Vasodilation/drug effects , Vasodilation/physiology , Vasodilator Agents/chemistry , Vasodilator Agents/pharmacology
10.
Diagn Pathol ; 16(1): 16, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, very few studies on clinical-histopathological correlations of cutaneous disorders associated with COVID-19 have been conducted. CASE PRESENTATION: The Case 1 was a 90-year-old man, who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 from a nasopharyngeal swab. Two days later, he was hospitalized and after eleven days transferred to Intensive Care Unit. A chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacities. Just that day, an erythematous maculo-papular rash appeared on trunk, shoulders and neck, becoming purpuric after few days. Histological evaluations revealed a chronic superficial dermatitis with purpuric aspects. The superficial and papillary dermis appeared edematous, with a perivascular lympho-granulocytic infiltrate and erythrocytic extravasation. At intraepithelial level, spongiosis and a granulocyte infiltrate were detected. Arterioles, capillaries and post-capillary venules showed endothelial swelling and appeared ectatic. The patient was treated with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, lopinavir-ritonavir and tocilizumab. Regrettably, due to severe lung impairment, he died. The Case 2 was a 85-year-old man, admitted to Intensive Care Unit, where he was intubated. He had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 from a nasopharyngeal swab two days before. A chest RX showed bilateral atypical pneumonia. After seven days, a cutaneous reddening involving trunk, upper limbs, neck and face developed, configuring a sub-erythroderma. Histological evaluations displayed edema in the papillary and superficial reticular dermis, and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the superficial dermis. The patient was treated with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, lopinavir-ritonavir and tocilizumab. Sub-erythroderma as well as respiratory symptoms gradually improved until healing. CONCLUSIONS: The endothelial swelling detected in the Case 1 could be a morphological expression of SARS-CoV-2-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that cutaneous damage could be initiated by endothelial dysfunction, caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection of endothelial cells or induced by immune system activation. The disruption of endothelial integrity could enhance microvascular permeability, extravasation of inflammatory cells and cytokines, with cutaneous injury. The Case 2 developed a sub-erythroderma associated with COVID-19, and a non-specific chronic dermatitis was detected at histological level. We speculate that a purpuric rash could represent the cutaneous sign of a more severe coagulopathy, as highlighted histologically by vascular abnormalities, while a sub-erythroderma could be expression of viral hematogenous spreading, inducing a non-specific chronic dermatitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dermatitis, Exfoliative/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Parapsoriasis/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Skin/pathology , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Dermatitis, Exfoliative/drug therapy , Dermatitis, Exfoliative/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Fatal Outcome , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Parapsoriasis/drug therapy , Parapsoriasis/virology , Skin/drug effects , Skin/virology , Treatment Outcome
11.
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol ; 414: 115412, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039572

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic with no end in sight. There is only one approved antiviral agent but global stocks are deemed insufficient. Despite in vitro antiviral activity, clinical trials of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were disappointing, and they may even impair outcomes. Chloroquine causes zebroid deposits reminiscent of Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency) and endothelial cells are key targets of COVID-19. We have explored the effect of chloroquine on cultured endothelial cells and its modulation by recombinant α-galactosidase A (agalsidase). Following dose-response studies, 0.5 µg/mL chloroquine was added to cultured human endothelial cells. Neutral red and Lysotracker were used to assess lysosomes. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) - MTT assay and cell stress by assessing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In endothelial cells, chloroquine induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity at in vitro test concentrations for COVID-19 therapy. At a sublethal concentration, chloroquine significantly induced the accumulation of acid organelles (P < 0.05), increased ROS levels, and decreased NO production (P < 0.05). These adverse effects of chloroquine on endothelial cell biology were decreased by agalsidase-ß (P < 0.05). Chloroquine-induced endothelial cell cytotoxicity and stress is attenuated by agalsidase-ß treatment. This suggests that endothelial cell injury may contribute to the failure of chloroquine as therapy for COVID-19 and may be at least in part related to causing dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Lysosomes/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Fabry Disease/chemically induced , Humans , Pandemics , Reactive Oxygen Species , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110455, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969218

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection generally begins in the respiratory tract where it can cause bilateral pneumonia. The disease can evolve into acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure, due to viral spread in the blood and an excessive inflammatory reaction including cytokine storm. Antiviral and anti-cytokine drugs have proven to be poorly or in-effective in stopping disease progression, and mortality or serious chronic damage is common in severely ill cases. The low efficacy of antiviral drugs is probably due to late administration, when the virus has triggered the inflammatory reaction and is no longer the main protagonist. The relatively poor efficacy of anti-cytokine drugs is explained by the fact that they act on one or a few of the dozens of cytokines involved, and because other mediators of inflammation - reactive oxygen and nitrogen species - are not targeted. When produced in excess, reactive species cause extensive cell and tissue damage. The only drug known to inhibit the excessive production of reactive species and cytokines is methylene blue, a low-cost dye with antiseptic properties used effectively to treat malaria, urinary tract infections, septic shock, and methaemoglobinaemia. We propose testing methylene blue to contrast Covid-related acute respiratory distress syndrome, but particularly suggest testing it early in Covid infections to prevent the hyper-inflammatory reaction responsible for the serious complications of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Methylene Blue/pharmacology , Models, Biological , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/injuries , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/prevention & control , Pandemics , Reactive Oxygen Species/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Failure
13.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110452, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965499

ABSTRACT

Statins and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors interfere with several pathophysiological pathways of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Statins may have a direct antiviral effect on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by inhibiting its main protease. Statin-induced up-regulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) may also be beneficial, whereas cholesterol reduction might significantly suppress SARS-CoV-2 by either blocking its host-cell entry through the disruption of lipid rafts or by inhibiting its replication. Available human studies have shown beneficial effects of statins and PCSK9 inhibitors on pneumonia and sepsis. These drugs may act as immunomodulators in COVID-19 and protect against major complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and cytokine release syndrome. Considering their antioxidative, anti-arrhythmic, antithrombotic properties and their beneficial effect on endothelial dysfunction, along with the increased risk of mortality of patients at high cardiovascular risk infected by SARS-CoV-2, statins and PCSK9 inhibitors might prove effective against the cardiovascular and thromboembolic complications of COVID-19. On the whole, randomized clinical trials are needed to establish routine use of statins and PCSK9 inhibitors in the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the meantime, it is recommended that lipid-lowering therapy should not be discontinued in COVID-19 patients unless otherwise indicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Safety , Sepsis/drug therapy , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Thromboembolism/prevention & control
14.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol ; 77(1): 1-3, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-880843

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The involvement of the vascular endothelium in the complications of coronavirus disease 2019 is now recognized. Chief among these are pulmonary endotheliitis, cytokine storm, endotoxic shock, and cardiovascular collapse. This Perspectives article is focused on therapeutical strategies to reduce the risk of these complications by targeting the vascular endothelium as a part of the overall treatment of coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Angiotensin II/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Drug Delivery Systems/trends , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Humans
15.
Atherosclerosis ; 314: 58-62, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856465

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) increases the risk of several non-pulmonary complications such as acute myocardial injury, renal failure or thromboembolic events. A possible unifying explanation for these phenomena may be the presence of profound endothelial dysfunction and injury. This review provides an overview on the association of endothelial dysfunction with COVID-19 and its therapeutic implications. Endothelial dysfunction is a common feature of the key comorbidities that increase risk for severe COVID-19 such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease or heart failure. Preliminary studies indicate that vascular endothelial cells can be infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and evidence of widespread endothelial injury and inflammation is found in advanced cases of COVID-19. Prior evidence has established the crucial role of endothelial cells in maintaining and regulating vascular homeostasis and blood coagulation. Aggravation of endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 may therefore impair organ perfusion and cause a procoagulatory state resulting in both macro- and microvascular thrombotic events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and statins are known to improve endothelial dysfunction. Data from smaller observational studies and other viral infections suggests a possible beneficial effect in COVID-19. Other treatments that are currently under investigation for COVID-19 may also act by improving endothelial dysfunction in patients. Focusing therapies on preventing and improving endothelial dysfunction could improve outcomes in COVID-19. Several clinical trials are currently underway to explore this concept.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prognosis , Renin-Angiotensin System , Risk Factors
16.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 56(6): 106191, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846626

ABSTRACT

Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is triggered by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus 2 (SARS-CoV2) and has rapidly developed into a worldwide pandemic. Unlike other SARS viruses, SARS-CoV2 does not solely impact the respiratory system, but additionally leads to inflammation of endothelial cells, microvascular injuries and coagulopathies, thereby affecting multiple organs. Recent reports of patients who were infected with SARS-CoV2 suggest persistent health problems even months after the initial infection. The French maritime pine bark extract PycnogenolⓇ has demonstrated anti-inflammatory, vascular and endothelium-protective effects in over 90 human clinical studies. It is proposed that PycnogenolⓇ may be beneficial in supporting recovery and mitigating symptoms and long-term consequences resulting from a SARS-CoV2 infection in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Flavonoids/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Blood Platelets/drug effects , COVID-19/etiology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Flavonoids/adverse effects , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Humans , Microcirculation/drug effects , Plant Extracts/adverse effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology
17.
Biomolecules ; 10(8)2020 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717704

ABSTRACT

Recently, the stabilization of the endothelium has been explicitly identified as a therapeutic goal in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Adrecizumab (HAM8101) is a first-in-class humanized monoclonal anti-Adrenomedullin (anti-ADM) antibody, targeting the sepsis- and inflammation-based vascular and capillary leakage. Within a "treatment on a named-patient basis" approach, Adrecizumab was administered to eight extreme-critically ill COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patients received a single dose of Adrecizumab, which was administered between 1 and 3 days after the initiation of mechanical ventilation. The SOFA (median 12.5) and SAPS-II (median 39) scores clearly documented the population at highest risk. Moreover, six of the patients suffered from acute renal failure, of whom five needed renal replacement therapy. The length of follow-up ranged between 13 and 27 days. Following the Adrecizumab administration, one patient in the low-dose group died at day 4 due to fulminant pulmonary embolism, while four were in stable condition, and three were discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). Within 12 days, the SOFA score, as well as the disease severity score (range 0-16, mirroring critical resources in the ICU, with higher scores indicating more severe illness), decreased in five out of the seven surviving patients (in all high-dose patients). The PaO2/FiO2 increased within 12 days, while the inflammatory parameters C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and interleukin-6 decreased. Importantly, the mortality was lower than expected and calculated by the SOFA score. In conclusion, in this preliminary uncontrolled case series of eight shock patients with life-threatening COVID-19 and ARDS, the administration of Adrecizumab was followed by a favorable outcome. Although the non-controlled design and the small sample size preclude any definitive statement about the potential efficacy of Adrecizumab in critically ill COVID-19 patients, the results of this case series are encouraging.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Critical Illness , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Sepsis/etiology
18.
Immunobiology ; 225(6): 152001, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696536

ABSTRACT

In COVID-19, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and thrombotic events are frequent, life-threatening complications. Autopsies commonly show arterial thrombosis and severe endothelial damage. Endothelial damage, which can play an early and central pathogenic role in ARDS and thrombosis, activates the lectin pathway of complement. Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), the lectin pathway's effector enzyme, binds the nucleocapsid protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), resulting in complement activation and lung injury. Narsoplimab, a fully human immunoglobulin gamma 4 (IgG4) monoclonal antibody against MASP-2, inhibits lectin pathway activation and has anticoagulant effects. In this study, the first time a lectin-pathway inhibitor was used to treat COVID-19, six COVID-19 patients with ARDS requiring continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or intubation received narsoplimab under compassionate use. At baseline and during treatment, circulating endothelial cell (CEC) counts and serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed. Narsoplimab treatment was associated with rapid and sustained reduction of CEC and concurrent reduction of serum IL-6, IL-8, CRP and LDH. Narsoplimab was well tolerated; no adverse drug reactions were reported. Two control groups were used for retrospective comparison, both showing significantly higher mortality than the narsoplimab-treated group. All narsoplimab-treated patients recovered and survived. Narsoplimab may be an effective treatment for COVID-19 by reducing COVID-19-related endothelial cell damage and the resultant inflammation and thrombotic risk.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Complement Pathway, Mannose-Binding Lectin/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Complement Pathway, Mannose-Binding Lectin/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/prevention & control , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Mannose-Binding Protein-Associated Serine Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Mannose-Binding Protein-Associated Serine Proteases/immunology , Mannose-Binding Protein-Associated Serine Proteases/metabolism , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/complications , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/immunology
19.
Cardiovasc Res ; 116(14): 2177-2184, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693970

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented healthcare emergency causing mortality and illness across the world. Although primarily affecting the lungs, the SARS-CoV-2 virus also affects the cardiovascular system. In addition to cardiac effects, e.g. myocarditis, arrhythmias, and myocardial damage, the vasculature is affected in COVID-19, both directly by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and indirectly as a result of a systemic inflammatory cytokine storm. This includes the role of the vascular endothelium in the recruitment of inflammatory leucocytes where they contribute to tissue damage and cytokine release, which are key drivers of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), in disseminated intravascular coagulation, and cardiovascular complications in COVID-19. There is also evidence linking endothelial cells (ECs) to SARS-CoV-2 infection including: (i) the expression and function of its receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the vasculature; (ii) the prevalence of a Kawasaki disease-like syndrome (vasculitis) in COVID-19; and (iii) evidence of EC infection with SARS-CoV-2 in patients with fatal COVID-19. Here, the Working Group on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Biology together with the Council of Basic Cardiovascular Science of the European Society of Cardiology provide a Position Statement on the importance of the endothelium in the underlying pathophysiology behind the clinical presentation in COVID-19 and identify key questions for future research to address. We propose that endothelial biomarkers and tests of function (e.g. flow-mediated dilatation) should be evaluated for their usefulness in the risk stratification of COVID-19 patients. A better understanding of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on endothelial biology in both the micro- and macrovasculature is required, and endothelial function testing should be considered in the follow-up of convalescent COVID-19 patients for early detection of long-term cardiovascular complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization
20.
Med Hypotheses ; 143: 110150, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688720

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 due to the SARS-CoV-2 infection is a multi-systemic immune syndrome affecting mainly the lungs, oropharyngeal region, and other vascular endothelial beds. There are tremendous ongoing efforts for the aim of developing drugs against the COVID-19 syndrome-associated inflammation. However, currently no specific medicine is present for the absolute pharmacological cure of COVID-19 mucositis. The re-purposing/re-positioning of already existing drugs is a very important strategy for the management of ongoing pandemy since the development of a new drug needs decades. Apart from altering angiotensin signaling pathways, novel drug candidates for re-purposing comprise medications shall target COVID-19 pathobiology, including pharmaceutical formulations that antagonize proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), mainly PAR-1. Activation of the PAR-1, mediators and hormones impact on the hemostasis, endothelial activation, alveolar epithelial cells and mucosal inflammatory responses which are the essentials of the COVID-19 pathophysiology. In this context, Ankaferd hemostat (Ankaferd Blood Stopper, ABS) which is an already approved hemostatic agent affecting via vital erythroid aggregation and fibrinogen gamma could be a potential topical remedy for the mucosal management of COVID-19. ABS is a clinically safe and effective topical hemostatic agent of plant origin capable of exerting pleiotropic effects on the endothelial cells, angiogenesis, cell proliferation and vascular dynamics. ABS had been approved as a topically applied hemostatic agent for the management of post-surgical/dental bleedings and healing of infected inflammatory mucosal wounds. The anti-inflammatory and proteinase-activated receptor axis properties of ABS with a considerable amount of oestrogenic hormone presence highlight this unique topical hemostatic drug regarding the clinical re-positioning for COVID-19-associated mucositis. Topical ABS as a biological response modifier may lessen SARS-CoV-2 associated microthrombosis, endothelial dysfunction, oropharyngeal inflammation and mucosal lung damage. Moreover, PAR-1 inhibition ability of ABS might be helpful for reducing the initial virus propagation and mocasal spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Estrogens/physiology , Hemostatics/therapeutic use , Mucositis/drug therapy , Pandemics , Phytoestrogens/therapeutic use , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Receptor, PAR-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Administration, Topical , Age Distribution , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/physiopathology , Drug Repositioning , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Estrogens/agonists , Hemostatics/administration & dosage , Humans , Mucositis/etiology , Phytoestrogens/administration & dosage , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptor, PAR-1/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stomatitis/drug therapy , Stomatitis/etiology , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology
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