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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714385

ABSTRACT

A 21-year-old patient presented with sudden-onset headache, visual disturbance and left hand incoordination. She was diagnosed with a left vertebral artery dissection of the V3 segment resulting in multiple cerebellar and cerebral infarcts. There were no risk factors for dissection other than recent COVID-19 infection. She was treated initially with antiplatelets, followed by anticoagulation, but experienced recurrent ischaemia. Although guidance suggests endovascular repair may be beneficial for patients with cerebral artery dissection (CAD) who experience recurrent strokes on medical therapy, evidence is limited. After multidisciplinary team consideration of the individual patient anatomy and risks and benefits of different endovascular techniques, the patient was treated with endovascular coiling. At 10 months follow-up, she had no further strokes and improving neurological symptoms. The case highlighted COVID-19 as a potential trigger for CAD and the use of endovascular coiling in preventing catastrophic cerebral ischaemia in CAD refractive to medical therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Vertebral Artery Dissection , Adult , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Female , Humans , Radiology, Interventional , SARS-CoV-2 , Vertebral Artery , Vertebral Artery Dissection/diagnostic imaging , Vertebral Artery Dissection/therapy , Young Adult
3.
Neurosurgery ; 87(3): 516-522, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pipeline embolization device (PED; Medtronic) and stent-assisted coiling (SAC) are established modalities for treatment of intracranial aneurysms. OBJECTIVE: To comparatively assess the efficacy of these techniques. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with aneurysms treated at our institution with either PED from 2013 to 2017 or SAC from 2009 to 2015. All large (>10 mm), ruptured, fusiform, anterior communicating artery, posterior circulation aneurysms, and patients with no available follow-up imaging were eliminated before running the propensity score matching (PSM). Patients were matched using nearest neighbor controlling for: age, gender, smoking, exact location, maximal diameter, and presence of multiple aneurysms. Total hospital costs for equipment and implants were calculated from procedure product and hospital billing records, and compared between the propensity-matched pairs. RESULTS: Out of 165 patients harboring 202 aneurysms; 170 (84.2%) were treated with the PED, and 32 (15.8%) were treated using SAC. PSM resulted in 23 matched pairs; with significantly longer follow up in the SAC group (mean 29.8 vs 14.1 mo; P = .0002). Complete occlusion rates were not different (82.6 vs 87%; P = .68), with no difference between the groups for modified Rankin Scale on last clinical follow-up, procedural complications or retreatment rates. Average total costs calculated from the hospital records, including equipment and implants, were not different between propensity-score matched pairs (P = .48). CONCLUSION: PED placement and SAC offer equally efficacious occlusion rates, functional outcomes, procedural complication rates, and cost profiles for small unruptured anterior circulation saccular aneurysms which do not involve the anterior communicating artery.


Subject(s)
Blood Vessel Prosthesis , Embolization, Therapeutic/instrumentation , Endovascular Procedures/instrumentation , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Stents , Adult , Aged , Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
4.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 77: 79-82, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356137

ABSTRACT

A rare case of aortic thrombosis in a young COVID-19 positive patient is presented in this case report. Arterial thrombosis developed despite the administration of anticoagulants for treating DVT and PE. The patient underwent axillobifemoral bypass surgery. Limited surgical surveillance, administered steroids and critical health status resulted in wound site infection and consequent graft removal. Aortic endarterectomy and autovenous-patch plasty were performed after the patient's condition improved. Etiopathogenesis of arterial events in the setting of COVID-19 is not entirely understood. It has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 infection strongly affects vascular endothelial glycocalyx (VEGLX), causes systemic inflammation - reactive microvascular endotheliosis (SIRME), and consequently results in arterial thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Aorta, Thoracic , Aortic Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Rare Diseases , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/surgery , Computed Tomography Angiography , Endarterectomy/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
5.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(3): 268-272, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is currently a major challenge for health care systems around the world. For a time-sensitive emergency such as acute ischemic stroke (AIS), streamlined workflow times are essential to ensure good clinical outcomes. METHODS: The aim of this single-center, retrospective, observational study was to describe changes in stroke workflow patterns and clinical care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from AIS patients undergoing emergent endovascular treatment (EVT) between 23 January and 8 April 2020 were retrospectively collected and compared with data from patients admitted during a similar period in 2019. The primary outcome was difference in time from symptom onset to recanalization. Secondary outcomes included workflow times, clinical management, discharge outcomes, and health-economic data. RESULTS: In all, 21 AIS patients were admitted for emergent EVT during the 77-day study period, compared with 42 cases in 2019. Median time from symptom onset to recanalization was 132 minutes longer during the pandemic compared with the previous year (672 vs. 540 min, P=0.049). Patients admitted during the pandemic had a higher likelihood of endotracheal intubation (84.6% vs. 42.4%, P<0.05) and a higher incidence of delayed extubation after EVT (69.2% vs. 45.5%, P<0.05). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at hospital discharge was similar in the 2 cohorts, whereas neurointensive care unit stay was longer in patients admitted during the pandemic (10 vs. 7 days, P=0.013) and hospitalization costs were higher (123.9 vs. 95.2 thousand Chinese Yuan, P=0.052). CONCLUSION: Disruptions to medical services during the COVID-19 pandemic has particularly impacted AIS patients undergoing emergent EVT, resulting in increased workflow times. A structured and multidisciplinary protocol should be implemented to minimize treatment delays and maximize patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Aged , Beijing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 238, 2021 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of our study was to analyse endovascular treatment (EVT) in patients presenting acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke with large-vessel occlusion (AIS-LVO) during the pandemic and post-epidemic periods. METHODS: Patients with AIS-LVO of the anterior circulation who underwent EVT were enrolled. According to the times of Wuhan closure and reopening, patients were divided into a pre-pandemic group (from November 8, 2019, to January 22, 2020), pandemic group (from January 23, 2020, to April 8, 2020) and post-epidemic group (from April 9, 2020, to June 24, 2020). The primary endpoints were the time delay among symptom onset to arriving hospital door, to groining puncture and to vascular reperfusion. Secondary endpoints were the functional outcomes evaluated by 90-day modified Rankin scale (mRS) score. RESULTS: In total, the times from onset to reperfusion (OTR, median 356 min vs. 310 min, p = 0.041) and onset to door (OTD, median 238 min vs. 167 min, p = 0.017) were prolonged in the pandemic group compared to the pre-pandemic group, and the delay continue in the post-epidemic period. In the subgroup analysis, the time from door to imaging (DTI) was significantly prolonged during the pandemic period. Interestingly, the prolonged DTI was corrected in the directly admitted subgroup during post-epidemic period. In addition, the functional outcomes showed no significant differences across the three periods. CONCLUSIONS: Total time and prehospital time were prolonged during the pandemic and post-epidemic periods. Urgent public education and improved in-hospital screening processes are necessary to decrease time delays.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reperfusion/methods , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
7.
Vasc Med ; 26(6): 613-623, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282193

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic's impact on vascular procedural volumes and outcomes has not been fully characterized. METHODS: Volume and outcome data before (1/2019 - 2/2020), during (3/2020 - 4/2020), and following (5/2020 - 6/2020) the initial pandemic surge were obtained from the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Volume changes were determined using interrupted Poisson time series regression. Adjusted mortality was estimated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: The final cohort comprised 57,181 patients from 147 US and Canadian sites. Overall procedure volumes fell 35.2% (95% CI 31.9%, 38.4%, p < 0.001) during and 19.8% (95% CI 16.8%, 22.9%, p < 0.001) following the surge, compared with presurge months. Procedure volumes fell 71.1% for claudication (95% CI 55.6%, 86.4%, p < 0.001) and 15.9% for chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) (95% CI 11.9%, 19.8%, p < 0.001) but remained unchanged for acute limb ischemia (ALI) when comparing surge to presurge months. Adjusted mortality was significantly higher among those with claudication (0.5% vs 0.1%; OR 4.38 [95% CI 1.42, 13.5], p = 0.01) and ALI (6.4% vs 4.4%; OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.39, 4.98], p = 0.003) when comparing postsurge with presurge periods. CONCLUSION: The first North American COVID-19 pandemic surge was associated with a significant and sustained decline in both elective and nonelective lower-extremity vascular procedural volumes. When compared with presurge patients, in-hospital mortality increased for those with claudication and ALI following the surge.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Limb Salvage , Lower Extremity , Pandemics , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
8.
Interv Neuroradiol ; 28(1): 58-64, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232409

ABSTRACT

AIM: The epidemic of COVID-19 has greatly affect the world health care system, particular measures have been taken not only to provide safety for health care providers but also to maintain the treatment quality. We evaluate the effect of COVID-19 epidemic to acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients with large vessel occlusion (LVO) received endovascular treatment (EVT) in our institution. METHODS: AIS patients with LVO who underwent EVT in the period of January 1st to April 30th between 2015 and 2020 from our stroke center. The baseline characteristics, working flow time, safety and efficacy outcome and the hospitalization status were retrospectively reviewed, compared and analyzed. RESULTS: There is significant decline in the number of AIS patients with LVO treated compared with the previous year (36 Vs 72 patients) during the epidemic period. The door to puncture time was significantly prolong (225 minutes versus 115 minutes) as well as the length of hospital stay with increase of the hospitalization costs (P < 0.05 for all). There is no significant difference on the safety and efficacy outcome, such recanalization rate, incidence of intracranial hemorrhage, functional independence and mortality during the epidemic (P > 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Prolongation of the working time flow during the COVID-19 epidemic did not influence the safety and efficacy of EVT in AIS patients with LVO. However, special policy and particular measures in this circumstances is still need to evolve to improve the treatment quality.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e217498, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196364

ABSTRACT

Importance: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a known neurological complication in patients with respiratory symptoms of COVID-19 infection. However, AIS has not been described as a late sequelae in patients without respiratory symptoms of COVID-19. Objective: To assess AIS experienced by adults 50 years or younger in the convalescent phase of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case series prospectively identified consecutive male patients who received care for AIS from public health hospitals in Singapore between May 21, 2020, and October 14, 2020. All of these patients had laboratory-confirmed asymptomatic COVID-19 infection based on a positive SARS-CoV-2 serological (antibodies) test result. These patients were individuals from South Asian countries (India and Bangladesh) who were working in Singapore and living in dormitories. The total number of COVID-19 cases (54 485) in the worker dormitory population was the population at risk. Patients with ongoing respiratory symptoms or positive SARS-CoV-2 serological test results confirmed through reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction nasopharyngeal swabs were excluded. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical course, imaging, and laboratory findings were retrieved from the electronic medical records of each participating hospital. The incidence rate of AIS in the case series was compared with that of a historical age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched national cohort. Results: A total of 18 male patients, with a median (range) age of 41 (35-50) years and South Asian ethnicity, were included. The median (range) time from a positive serological test result to AIS was 54.5 (0-130) days. The median (range) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 5 (1-25). Ten patients (56%) presented with a large vessel occlusion, of whom 6 patients underwent intravenous thrombolysis and/or endovascular therapy. Only 3 patients (17%) had a possible cardiac source of embolus. The estimated annual incidence rate of AIS was 82.6 cases per 100 000 people in this study compared with 38.2 cases per 100 000 people in the historical age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched cohort (rate ratio, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.36-3.48; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This case series suggests that the risk for AIS is higher in adults 50 years or younger during the convalescent period of a COVID-19 infection without respiratory symptoms. Acute ischemic stroke could be part of the next wave of complications of COVID-19, and stroke units should be on alert and use serological testing, especially in younger patients or in the absence of traditional risk factors.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Convalescence , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/ethnology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Singapore/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(5): 105642, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091714

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented strain on the health care system. An adaptive strategy for the handling of thrombectomy for patients with large vessel occlusion has evolved at our center to optimize patient care while also minimizing risk of virus transmission. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the new thrombectomy protocol by comparing thrombectomy times and patient outcomes during the pandemic and pre pandemic period. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients who underwent emergent thrombectomy from April 4th, 2020 to August 25th, 2020 (pandemic period) and between December 2nd, 2019 to April 3rd, 2020 (pre-pandemic period). The new protocol centered on a standardized approach to airway management in patients considered 'high-risk' for infection. An array of patient-specific factors and outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 126 patients were included in the study. There was no significant difference in door-to-recanalization or other time parameters between the two groups (138 minutes during the pandemic vs. 129 minutes pre-pandemic; p=0.37). However, outcomes measured as discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were worse for patients during the pandemic (mRS ≤ 2, 10/58; 17.2% during pandemic vs. 24/68; 35.3% pre-pandemic, p = 0.02). No neurointerventional providers have been found to contract COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Our approach to mechanical thrombectomy during the COVID-19 era was associated with similar recanalization rates but worse clinical outcomes compared to pre pandemic period. Further studies are necessary to identify factors contributing to worse outcomes during this ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/surgery , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Stroke/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Airway Management , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Clinical Protocols , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Thrombectomy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(2)2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066838

ABSTRACT

We report a case of aortoenteric fistula 2 years following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for mycotic aneurysm presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Initial CT angiogram did not reveal the bleeding or connection to bowel, but endoscopy was suspicious of endograft in the duodenum. Management required a multidisciplinary approach. To stabilise the patient and to control bleeding, a 'bridging' endograft extension was performed. This was followed by open surgical removal of the EVAR endograft and lower limb in situ revascularisation. During postoperative recovery, the patient developed atypical, staged multisystemic symptoms (cardiac, pulmonary and neurological). With increasing awareness of the COVID-19 pandemic, the patient was found SARS-CoV-2-positive, which explained the progression of his symptoms. This was also reflected on other case reports in literature later.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Infected/surgery , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intestinal Fistula/complications , Vascular Fistula/complications , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Aorta/diagnostic imaging , Aorta/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Humans , Intestinal Fistula/diagnostic imaging , Intestinal Fistula/surgery , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Fistula/diagnostic imaging , Vascular Fistula/surgery
12.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 34(1): 18-21, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940813

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review the current literature on endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the aftermath of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown. RECENT FINDINGS: The outbreak of the COVID-19 has had effect of unprecedented magnitude on the social, economic and personal aspects around the globe. Healthcare providers were forced to expand capacity to provide care to the surging number of symptomatic COVID-19 patients, while maintaining a fully operating service for all non-COVID patients. The recent literature suggesting an overall decrease in acute ischemic stroke admissions as well as total number of endovascular treatments will be reviewed. Although the underlying reasons therefore remain the matter of debate, it seems that the imposed restrictions, requiring social distancing, and stopping all nonessential services, have led to a higher threshold for patients to seek medical attention, in particular in those with less severe symptoms. Thus, raising public awareness on the importance of strokes and transient ischemic attacks is even more important in the light of the current situation to avoid serious healthcare, economic consequences, and limit long term morbidity. SUMMARY: The priority remains maintaining a fast and efficient pre and in-hospital work-flow while mitigating nosocomial transmission and protecting the patient and the healthcare workers with appropriate personal protective equipment.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Thrombectomy/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics
13.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(2): e1, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883391

ABSTRACT

This is a report of the first three cases of endovascular aneurysm treatment that were proctored by a remote interventionalist using a novel high-resolution low-latency streaming technology. The proctor was located in a neurovascular centre and supported the treating interventional teams in two distant cities (up to 800 km/500 miles apart). All aneurysms were treated using the Woven EndoBridge (WEB) embolisation system, either electively or following subarachnoid haemorrhage. On-site proctoring was not possible due to travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. WEB placement was feasible in all cases. Good rapport between proctors and treating physicians was reported, enabled by the high-resolution image transmission and uninterrupted feedback/discussion via audiostream. No clinical complications were encountered. Short-term follow-up revealed adequate occlusion of all treated aneurysms. The employed streaming technology provided effective remote proctoring during complex aneurysm cases, including the management of technical complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation , Communication , Embolization, Therapeutic , Feedback , Humans , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814252

ABSTRACT

This is a report of the first three cases of endovascular aneurysm treatment that were proctored by a remote interventionalist using a novel high-resolution low-latency streaming technology. The proctor was located in a neurovascular centre and supported the treating interventional teams in two distant cities (up to 800 km/500 miles apart). All aneurysms were treated using the Woven EndoBridge (WEB) embolisation system, either electively or following subarachnoid haemorrhage. On-site proctoring was not possible due to travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. WEB placement was feasible in all cases. Good rapport between proctors and treating physicians was reported, enabled by the high-resolution image transmission and uninterrupted feedback/discussion via audiostream. No clinical complications were encountered. Short-term follow-up revealed adequate occlusion of all treated aneurysms. The employed streaming technology provided effective remote proctoring during complex aneurysm cases, including the management of technical complications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Angiography, Digital Subtraction/methods , COVID-19 , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(11): 1045-1048, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the outcome of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who received endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) with confirmed COVID-19 to those without. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis using the Vizient Clinical Data Base and included hospital discharges from April 1 to July 31 2020 with ICD-10 codes for AIS and EVT. The primary outcome was in-hospital death and the secondary outcome was favorable discharge, defined as discharge home or to acute rehabilitation. We compared patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 to those without. As a sensitivity analysis, we compared COVID-19 AIS patients who did not undergo EVT to those who did, to balance potential adverse events inherent to COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: We identified 3165 AIS patients who received EVT during April to July 2020, in which COVID-19 was confirmed in 104 (3.3%). Comorbid COVID-19 infection was associated with younger age, male sex, diabetes, black race, Hispanic ethnicity, intubation, acute coronary syndrome, acute renal failure, and longer hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. The rate of in-hospital death was 12.4% without COVID-19 vs 29.8% with COVID-19 (P<0.001). In mixed-effects logistic regression that accounted for patient clustering by hospital, comorbid COVID-19 increased the odds of in-hospital death over four-fold (OR 4.48, 95% CI 3.02 to 6.165). Comorbid COVID-19 was also associated with lower odds of a favorable discharge (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61). In the sensitivity analysis, comparing AIS patients with COVID-19 who did not undergo EVT (n=2139) to the AIS EVT patients with COVID-19, there was no difference in the rate of in-hospital death (30.6% vs 29.8%, P=0.868), and AIS EVT patients had a higher rate of favorable discharge (32.4% vs 47.1%, P=0.002). CONCLUSION: In AIS patients treated with EVT, comorbid COVID-19 infection was associated with in-hospital death and a lower odds of favorable discharge compared with patients without COVID-19, but not compared with AIS patients with COVID-19 who did not undergo EVT. AIS EVT patients with COVID-19 were younger, more likely to be male, have systemic complications, and almost twice as likely to be black and over three times as likely to be Hispanic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/complications , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Stroke Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
16.
BMC Neurol ; 20(1): 358, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic is associated with an increased incidence of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to large vessel occlusion (LVO). The treatment of these patients poses unique and significant challenges to health care providers requiring changes in existing protocols. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old COVID-19 positive patient developed sudden onset left hemiparesis secondary to an acute right middle cerebral artery occlusion (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score = 11). Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) was performed under a new protocol specifically designed to maximize protective measures for the team involved in the care of the patient. Mechanical Thrombectomy was performed successfully under general anesthesia resulting in TICI 3 recanalization. With regards to time metrics, time from door to reperfusion was 60 mins. The 24-h NIHSS score decreased to 2. Patient was discharged after 19 days after improvement of her pulmonary status with modified Rankin Scale = 1. CONCLUSION: Patients infected by COVID-19 can develop LVO that is multifactorial in etiology. Mechanical thrombectomy in a COVID-19 confirmed patient presenting with AIS due to LVO is feasible with current mechanical thrombectomy devices. A change in stroke workflow and protocols is now necessary in order to deliver the appropriate life-saving therapy for COVID-19 positive patients while protecting medical providers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/surgery , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombectomy/methods , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Intubation, Intratracheal , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reperfusion , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
18.
Ann Ital Chir ; 91: 273-276, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739593

ABSTRACT

CASE REPORT: A 64-year-old woman presented to our emergency department during the outbreak of the covid-19 emergency in Italy with syncope, anosmia, mild dyspnoea and atypical chest and dorsal pain. A chest CT scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection (ATBAD) and bilateral lung involvement with ground-glass opacity, compatible with interstitial pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal swabs resulted positive for SARS-CoV-2. For the persistence of chest pain, despite the analgesic therapy, we decided to treat her with a TEVAR. Patient's chest and back pain resolved during the first few days after the procedure. No surgical or respiratory complications occurred and the patient was discharged 14 days after surgery. DISCUSSION: By performing the operation under local anesthesia, it was possible to limit both the staff inside the operatory room and droplet/aerosol release. Since we had to perform the operation in a hemodynamics room, thanks to the limited extension of the endoprosthesis and the good caliber of the right vertebral artery we were able to reduce the risk of spinal cord ischemia despite the lack of a revascularization of the left subclavian artery. CONCLUSIONS: A minimally invasive total endovascular approach allows, through local anesthesia and percutaneous access, to avoid surgical cut down and orotracheal intubation. This, combined with a defined management protocol for infected patients, seems to be a reasonable way to perform endovascular aortic procedures in urgent setting, even in a SARSCoV- 2 positive patient. KEY WORDS: COVID-19, Dissection, TEVAR.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting/surgery , Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/surgery , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anesthesia, Local , Aneurysm, Dissecting/complications , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/complications , COVID-19 , Contraindications, Procedure , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Drug Therapy, Combination , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Operating Rooms , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord Ischemia/prevention & control , Vertebral Artery/surgery
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