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1.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268655, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875093

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) is a perioperative program combining multiple evidence-based interventions designed to reduce the surgical stress response. Despite the publication of dedicated guidelines, ERAS application to gynecologic surgery outside clinical studies has been slow and fragmented. To promote the systematic adoption of the ERAS program in the entire regional hospital network in Piedmont an Audit-and-Feedback approach (A&F) has been adopted within a cluster randomized controlled trial, aiming to estimate the true impact of the protocol on a large, unselected population. METHODS: The study protocol provides for a multicenter stepped wedge cluster randomized trial, focused on women undergoing an hysterectomy, for comparison between standard perioperative management and perioperative management according to the ERAS protocol. The primary outcome is the length of hospital stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes are: post-operative complications, quality-of-recovery at 24-hours after surgery, 30-day readmissions, patients' satisfaction, healthcare costs. The compliance to all the ERAS items is monitored with an A&F approach. All the gynecologic units of Piedmont hospitals are involved and all the patients hospitalized for elective hysterectomy in the period of the study are included. Centers, stratified by surgical volume and randomly assigned to four groups, are randomly ordered to activate the ERAS protocol in four periods, every three months. The planned calendar and the total duration of the study have been extended for six months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The expected sample size of about 2400 patients has a high statistical power (99%) to detect a reduction of LOS of 1 day (effect size 0.5) and to estimate clinically meaningful changes in the other study endpoints. The study protocol has been approved by the Ethical Committee of all participating centers. Study results will be timely circulated within the hospital network and published in peer-reviewed journals. CONCLUSION: Results are expected to demonstrate positive clinical outcomes of the ERAS protocol even when its implementation is directed towards an entire regional network of gynecologic units, and not only towards selected and highly motivated centers. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04063072.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Feedback , Female , Humans , Hysterectomy , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e055822, 2022 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784819

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programmes following hysterectomies have been studied since 2010, and their positive effects on clinical or economic criteria are now well established. However, the benefits on health outcomes, especially rapid recovery after surgery from patients' perspective is lacking in literature, leading to develop scores supporting person-centred and value-based care such as patient-reported outcome measures. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of an ERAS programme on patients' well-being after undergoing hysterectomy. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is an observational, prospective single-centre before-after clinical trial. 148 patients are recruited and allocated into two groups, before and after ERAS programme implementation, respectively. The ERAS programme consists in optimising factors dealing with early rehabilitation, such as preoperative patient education, multimodal pain management, early postoperative fluid taken and mobilisation. A self-questionnaire quality of recovery-15 (QoR-15) on the preoperative day 1 (D-1), postoperative day 0 evening (D0) and the postoperative day 1 (D+1) is completed by patients. Patients scheduled to undergo hysterectomy, aged 18 years and above, whose physical status are classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists score 1-3 and who are able to return home after being discharged from hospital and contact their physician or the medical department if necessary are recruited for this study. The total duration of inclusion is 36 months. The primary outcome is the difference in QoR-15 scores measured on D+1 which will be compared between the 'before' and the 'after' group, using multiple linear regression model. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approval was obtained from the Ethical Committee (Paris, France). Subjects are actually being recruited after giving their oral agreement or non-objection to participate in this clinical trial and following the oral and written information given by the anaesthesiologist practitioner.Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04268576 (Pre-result).


Subject(s)
Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Controlled Before-After Studies , Female , Humans , Hysterectomy , Length of Stay , Observational Studies as Topic , Prospective Studies
4.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254958, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic forced a reconsideration of surgical patient management in the setting of scarce resources and risk of viral transmission. Herein we assess the impact of implementing a protocol of more rigorous patient education, recovery room assessment for non-ICU admission, earlier mobilization and post-discharge communication for patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. METHODS: A case-control retrospective review was undertaken at a community hospital with a dedicated neurosurgery and otolaryngology team using minimally invasive surgical techniques, total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) and early post-operative imaging protocols. All patients undergoing craniotomy or endoscopic endonasal removal of a brain, skull base or pituitary tumor were included during two non-overlapping periods: March 2019-January 2020 (pre-pandemic epoch) versus March 2020-January 2021 (pandemic epoch with streamlined care protocol implemented). Data collection included demographics, preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status, tumor pathology, and tumor resection and remission rates. Primary outcomes were ICU utilization and hospital length of stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes were complications, readmissions and reoperations. FINDINGS: Of 295 patients, 163 patients were treated pre-pandemic (58% women, mean age 53.2±16 years) and 132 were treated during the pandemic (52% women, mean age 52.3±17 years). From pre-pandemic to pandemic, ICU utilization decreased from 92(54%) to 43(29%) of operations (p<0.001) and hospital LOS≤1 day increased from 21(12.2%) to 60(41.4%), p<0.001, respectively. For craniotomy cohort, median LOS was 2 days for both epochs; median ICU LOS decreased from 1 to 0 days (p<0.001), ICU use decreased from 73(80%) to 29(33%),(p<0.001). For endonasal cohort, median LOS decreased from 2 to 1 days; median ICU LOS was 0 days for both epochs; (p<0.001). There were no differences pre-pandemic versus pandemic in ASA scores, resection/remission rates, readmissions or reoperations. CONCLUSION: This experience suggests the COVID-19 pandemic provided an opportunity for implementing a brain tumor care protocol to facilitate safely decreasing ICU utilization and accelerating discharge home without an increase in complications, readmission or reoperations. More rigorous patient education, recovery room assessment for non-ICU admission, earlier mobilization and post-discharge communication, layered upon a foundation of minimally invasive surgery, TIVA anesthesia and early post-operative imaging are possible contributors to these favorable trends.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Case-Control Studies , Craniotomy/methods , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/methods , Patient Discharge , Patient Readmission , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Period , Reoperation/methods , Retrospective Studies
5.
Braz J Cardiovasc Surg ; 36(3): 822-824, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302844

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic brings numerous challenges to the health ecosystem, including the safe resumption of elective cardiac surgery. In the pre-pandemic period, rapid recovery protocols demonstrated, through strategies focused on the multidisciplinary approach, reduction of hospital length of stay, infection rates and, consequently, costs. Even with several studies proving the benefits of these protocols, their acceptance and implementation have been slow. It is believed that the resumption of surgeries in the current context requires the use of rapid recovery protocols combined with the use of a mobile application promoting greater engagement between patients, caregivers and care teams.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Technology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Humans , Mobile Applications , Patient Care Team
7.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 524-529, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288677

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous bariatric surgical units globally have halted weight loss surgery. Obesity itself has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in people infected with the virus. The aim of this study was to report our experience as a high-volume bariatric institution resuming elective weight loss surgery safely amidst emergency admissions of COVID-19-positive patients. METHODS: A standard operating procedure based on national guidance and altered to accommodate local considerations was initiated across the hospital. Data were collected prospectively for 50 consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery following recommencement of elective surgery after the first national lockdown in the UK. RESULTS: Between 28 June and 5 August 2020, a total of 50 patients underwent bariatric surgery of whom 94% were female. Median age was 41 years and median body mass index was 43.8 (interquartile range 40.0-48.8)kg/m2. Half of the patients (n = 25/50) underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and half underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Of these 50 patients, 9 (18%) had revisional bariatric surgery. Overall median length of hospital stay was 1 day, with 96% of the study population being discharged within 24h of surgery. The overall rate of readmission was 6% and one patient (2%) returned to theatre with an obstruction proximal to jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. None of the patients exhibited symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: With appropriately implemented measures and precautions, resumption of bariatric surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic appears feasible and safe with no increased risk to patients.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Bariatric Surgery/standards , Bariatric Surgery/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Protocols/standards , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery/standards , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
8.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(12): 7785-7791, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgery remains the first curative treatment for colorectal cancer. Prehabilitation seems to attenuate the loss of lean mass in the early postoperative period. However, its long-term role has not been studied. Lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic has forced to carry out the prehabilitation program at home. This study aimed to assess the effect of home prehabilitation on body composition, complications, and hospital stay in patients undergoing oncological colorectal surgery. METHODS: A prospective and randomized clinical study was conducted in 20 patients operated of colorectal cancer during COVID-19 lockdown (13 March to 21 June 2020) in a single university clinical hospital. Patients were randomized into two study groups (10 per group): prehabilitation vs standard care. Changes in lean mass and fat mass at 45 and 90 days after surgery were measured using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. RESULTS: Prehabilitation managed to reduce hospital stay (4.8 vs 7.2 days, p = 0.052) and postoperative complications (20% vs 50%, p = 0.16). Forty-five days after surgery, the loss of lean mass decreased (1.7% vs 7.1%, p = 0.17). These differences in lean mass were attenuated at 90 days; however, the standard care group increased considerably their fat mass compared to the prehabilitation group (+ 8.72% vs - 8.16%). CONCLUSIONS: Home prehabilitation has proven its effectiveness, achieving an attenuation of lean mass loss in the early postoperative period and a lower gain in fat mass in the late postoperative period. In addition, it has managed to reduce hospital stays and postoperative complications. REGISTRATION NUMBER: This article is part of an ongoing, randomized, and controlled clinical trial approved by the ethics committee of our hospital and registered in ClinicalTrials.gov in August 2018 with registration number NCT03618329.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Preoperative Care , Preoperative Exercise , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
9.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e047491, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261190

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The ERAS protocol (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) is a multimodal pathway aimed to reduce surgical stress and to allow a rapid postoperative recovery. Application of the ERAS protocol to colorectal cancer surgery has been limited to a minority of hospitals in Italy. To promote the systematic adoption of ERAS in the entire regional hospital network in Piemonte an Audit and Feedback approach (A&F) has been adopted together with a cluster randomised trial to estimate the true impact of the protocol on a large, unselected population. METHODS: A multicentre stepped wedge cluster randomised trial is designed for comparison between standard perioperative management and the management according to the ERAS protocol. The primary outcome is the length of hospital stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes are: incidence of postoperative complications, time to patients' recovery, control of pain and patients' satisfaction. With an A&F approach the adherence to the ERAS items is monitored through a dedicated area in the study web site. The study includes 28 surgical centres, stratified by activity volume and randomly divided into four groups. Each group is randomly assigned to a different activation period of the ERAS protocol. There are four activation periods, one every 3 months. However, the planned calendar and the total duration of the study have been extended by 6 months due to the COVID-19 pandemic.The expected sample size of about 2200 patients has a high statistical power (98%) to detect a reduction of LOS of 1 day and to estimate clinically meaningful changes in the other endpoints. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol has been approved by the Ethical Committee of the coordinating centre and by all participating centres. Study results will be timely circulated within the hospital network and published in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04037787.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Feedback , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 8979, 2021 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203451

ABSTRACT

The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol affected traditional cardiac surgery processes and COVID-19 is expected to accelerate its scalability. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an ERAS-based protocol on the length of hospital stay after cardiac surgery. From January 2019 to June 2020, 664 patients underwent consecutive cardiac surgery at a Latin American center. Here, 46 patients were prepared for a rapid recovery through a multidisciplinary institutional protocol based on the ERAS concept, the "TotalCor protocol". After the propensity score matching, 46 patients from the entire population were adjusted for 12 variables. Patients operated on the TotalCor protocol had reduced intensive care unit time (P < 0.025), postoperative stay (P ≤ 0.001) and length of hospital stay (P ≤ 0.001). In addition, there were no significant differences in the occurrence of complications and death between the two groups. Of the 10-central metrics of TotalCor protocol, 6 had > 70% adherences. In conclusion, the TotalCor protocol was safe and effective for a 3-day discharge after cardiac surgery. Postoperative atrial fibrillation and renal failure were predictors of postoperative stay > 5 days.


Subject(s)
Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Length of Stay , Patient Discharge , Patient Safety , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Patient Care Team , Postoperative Complications , Propensity Score
11.
JAMA Surg ; 156(8): 775-784, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195105

ABSTRACT

Importance: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) is a global surgical quality improvement initiative now firmly entrenched within the field of perioperative care. Although ERAS is associated with significant clinical outcome improvements and cost savings in numerous surgical specialties, several opportunities and challenges deserve further discussion. Observations: Uptake and implementation of ERAS Society guidelines, together with ERAS-related research, have increased exponentially since the inception of the ERAS movement. Opportunities to further improve patient outcomes include addressing frailty, optimizing nutrition, prehabilitation, correcting preoperative anemia, and improving uptake of ERAS worldwide, including in low- and middle-income countries. Challenges facing enhanced recovery today include implementation, carbohydrate loading, reversal of neuromuscular blockade, and bowel preparation. The COVID-19 pandemic poses both a challenge and an opportunity for ERAS. Conclusions and Relevance: To date, ERAS has achieved significant benefit for patients and health systems; however, improvements are still needed, particularly in the areas of patient optimization and systematic implementation. During this time of global crisis, the ERAS method of delivering care is required to take surgery and anesthesia to the next level and bring improvements in outcomes to both patients and health systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Clinical Protocols , Cost Savings , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
12.
Surgery ; 170(2): 558-562, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While elective surgery was shut down in most settings during the 2019 novel coronavirus pandemic, some referral centers were designated as surgery hubs. We sought to investigate how the pandemic scenario impacted the quality of a long-established enhanced recovery protocol colorectal surgery program in 2 referral centers, designated as colorectal surgery hubs, located in the epicentral Italian regions hardest hit by the pandemic. METHODS: We compared short-term outcomes of patients undergoing major colorectal surgery with a long-established enhanced recovery protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak occurred in 2020 (group A) with the correspondent timeframe of 2019 (group B). Primary outcomes were morbidity and mortality, duration of stay, and readmission rate. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-six patients underwent major colorectal surgery in group A and 173 in group B. Postoperative complications and readmission rate were comparable between the 2 groups. Oncologic case-log was predominant in group A compared with group B (73.5 vs 61%; P = .01). A significantly shorter overall duration of stay was found in group A (P < .001). Uncomplicated patients of group A had a shorter duration of stay when compared with uncomplicated patients of group B (P = .008). CONCLUSION: Under special precautionary measures, major colorectal surgery can be undertaken on elective basis even during coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic with reasonable results. A reduction of duration of stay within a long-established enhanced recovery protocol colorectal surgery program was observed during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic occurred in 2020 in comparison with the correspondent timeframe of the previous year without compromising short-term outcomes. The pandemic uncovered the positive impact of patients' commitment to reducing duration of stay as the empowered risk awareness likely promoted their compliance to the enhanced recovery protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
13.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 37(6): 827-833, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103433

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: SARS-COV-2 pandemic has affected the population worldwide requiring social distancing, quarantine and isolation as strategies to control virus propagation. Initial measures to reduce the burden to the health care system during the pandemic included deferring elective surgery. These damage control measures did not take into account the mid- and long-term implications. Management of congenital anomalies can be time sensitive with delays resulting in permanent disability, morbidity and increased costs to the healthcare system. This study reports the results of using a novel scoring system that enables triage of time sensitive congenital anomalies and pediatric surgical conditions and how implementation of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS®) principles allowed optimization of resources and reduced the burden to the system while allowing for appropriate care of pediatric patients with urgent urologic surgical conditions. METHODS: We present a prospective case series of patients with congenital urological conditions scheduled and taken to surgery during COVID-19 pandemic. All pediatric urology cases that were pending and or scheduled for surgery at the moment the pandemic struck as well as all cases that presented to the emergency department with urological conditions were triaged and included for analysis using a modified Medically Necessary, Time-Sensitive Procedures: Scoring System (MeNTS). A modified MeNTS was implemented for pediatric patients, giving more priority to the impact of deferring surgical intervention on patient's prognosis. An individualized evaluation using this scoring system was applied to each patient. Intra- and postoperative ERAS® principles were applied to all cases operated during the pandemic between March 20th and April 24th to reduce the burden to the healthcare system. RESULTS: A total of 49 patients were triaged and included for analysis with a mean age of 6.47 years of age. Adjusted MeNTS showed that all clinically emergent cases had a score of 12 or less. Cases that could be postponed for 2 weeks but no longer had a score between 13 and 15. The ones that could wait 6 weeks or longer had scores higher than 16. Score results were not the same for similar procedures and individualized assessments resulted in scores based on an individual patient's conditions. From the total cases, implementation of ERAS® principles increased outpatient procedures from 68 to 90.4%. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a novel triaging method to rank pediatric urological surgical management based on individualized patient's clinical conditions. Cutoff values of 12 and 16 allowed appropriate triage preventing the postponement of urgent urologic cases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Implementation of ERAS® principles allowed for these procedures to be done in the outpatient setting, preserving valuable healthcare resources. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective cohort study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pediatrics/methods , Triage/methods , Urologic Diseases/surgery , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(1)2021 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067761

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduction in hip and knee replacement surgery across healthcare systems. When regular operating returns, there will be a large volume of patients and an emphasis on a short hospital stay. Patients will be keen to return home, and capacity will need to maximised. Strategies to reduce the associated risks of surgery and to accelerate recovery will be needed, and so Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) should be promoted as the model of care. ERAS protocols are proven to reduce hospital stay safely; however, ERAS pathways may require adaption to ensure both patient and staff safety. The risk of exposure to possible sources of COVID-19 should be limited, and so hospital visits should be minimised. The use of technology such as smartphone apps to provide pre-operative education, wearable activity trackers to assist with rehabilitation, and the use of telemedicine to complete outpatient appointments may be utilised. Also, units should be reminded that ERAS protocols are multi-modal, and every component is vital to minimise the surgical stress response. The focus should be on providing better and not just faster care. Units should learn from the past in order to expedite the implementation of or adaption of existing ERAS protocols. Strong leadership will be required, along with a supportive organisational culture, an inter-professional approach, and a recognised QI method should be used to contextualize improvement efforts.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/rehabilitation , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/rehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery/standards , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Care/standards , Recovery of Function
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(1)2021 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038661

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduction in hip and knee replacement surgery across healthcare systems. When regular operating returns, there will be a large volume of patients and an emphasis on a short hospital stay. Patients will be keen to return home, and capacity will need to maximised. Strategies to reduce the associated risks of surgery and to accelerate recovery will be needed, and so Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) should be promoted as the model of care. ERAS protocols are proven to reduce hospital stay safely; however, ERAS pathways may require adaption to ensure both patient and staff safety. The risk of exposure to possible sources of COVID-19 should be limited, and so hospital visits should be minimised. The use of technology such as smartphone apps to provide pre-operative education, wearable activity trackers to assist with rehabilitation, and the use of telemedicine to complete outpatient appointments may be utilised. Also, units should be reminded that ERAS protocols are multi-modal, and every component is vital to minimise the surgical stress response. The focus should be on providing better and not just faster care. Units should learn from the past in order to expedite the implementation of or adaption of existing ERAS protocols. Strong leadership will be required, along with a supportive organisational culture, an inter-professional approach, and a recognised QI method should be used to contextualize improvement efforts.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/rehabilitation , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/rehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery/standards , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Care/standards , Recovery of Function
17.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(3): 481-489, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988421

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This review formulates the rationale for using enhanced recovery protocols (ERPs) to standardize and optimize perioperative care during this high-risk time to minimize poor outcomes owing to provider, patient, and system vulnerabilities. DATA SOURCES: n/a METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: A literature review using key Medical Subject Headings terms was performed-according to methods described by the Cochrane Collaboration and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines-on studies that described enhanced recovery and coronavirus disease (COVID-19). TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Modifications to our existing ERPs related to the COVID-19 pandemic should include new accommodations for patient education, preoperative COVID-19 testing, prehabilitation, and intraoperative infection as well as thromboembolism risk reduction. CONCLUSION: ERPs are evidence-based, best practice guidelines applied across the perioperative continuum to mitigate surgical stress, decrease complications, and accelerate recovery. These benefits are part of the high-value-care equation needed to solve the clinical, operational, and financial challenges of the current COVID-19 pandemic. The factors driving outcomes on ERPs, such as the provision of minimally invasive surgery, warrant careful consideration. Tracking patient outcomes and improving care in response to outcomes data are key to the success of clinical care protocols such as ERPs. Numerous emerging clinical registries and reporting systems have been activated to provide outcomes data on the impact of COVID-19. This will inform and change surgical practice as well as provide opportunity to learn if the advantages that surgeons, patients, and the healthcare system might gain from using ERPs during a pandemic are meaningful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Infection Control , Organizational Innovation , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Knee Surg ; 35(4): 424-433, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729017

ABSTRACT

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) represents a paradigm shift in perioperative care, aimed at achieving early recovery for surgical patients, reducing length of hospital stay, and complications. The purpose of this study was to provide an insight of the impact of the COVID-19 on ERAS protocols for knee arthroplasty patients in a tertiary hospital and potential strategy changes for postpandemic practice. We retrospectively reviewed all cases that underwent surgery utilizing ERAS protocols in the quarter prior to the pandemic (fourth quarter of 2019) and during the first quarter of 2020 when the pandemic started. A review of the literature on ERAS protocols for knee arthroplasty during the COVID-19 pandemic was also performed and discussed. A total of 199 knee arthroplasties were performed in fourth quarter of 2019 as compared with 76 in the first quarter of 2020 during the COVID-19 outbreak. Patients who underwent surgery in the first quarter of 2020 had shorter inpatient stays (3.8 vs. 4.5 days), larger percentage of discharges by postoperative day 5 (86.8 vs. 74.9%), and a larger proportion of patients discharged to their own homes (68 vs. 54%). The overall complication rate (1.3 vs. 3%) and readmission within 30 days (2.6 vs. 2%) was similar between both groups. ERAS protocols appear to reduce hospital lengths of stay for patients undergoing knee arthroplasty without increasing the risk of short-term complications and readmissions. The beneficial effects of ERAS appear to be amplified by and are synchronous with the requirements of operating in the era of a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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