Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Biol Open ; 10(3)2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148236

ABSTRACT

People with underlying conditions, including hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, are especially susceptible to negative outcomes after infection with coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. Hypertension and respiratory inflammation are exacerbated by the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS), which normally protects from rapidly dropping blood pressure via Angiotensin II (Ang II) produced by the enzyme Ace. The Ace paralog Ace2 degrades Ang II, counteracting its chronic effects, and serves as the SARS-CoV-2 receptor. Ace, the coronavirus, and COVID-19 comorbidities all regulate Ace2, but we do not yet understand how. To exploit zebrafish (Danio rerio) to help understand the relationship of the RAAS to COVID-19, we must identify zebrafish orthologs and co-orthologs of human RAAS genes and understand their expression patterns. To achieve these goals, we conducted genomic and phylogenetic analyses and investigated single cell transcriptomes. Results showed that most human RAAS genes have one or more zebrafish orthologs or co-orthologs. Results identified a specific type of enterocyte as the specific site of expression of zebrafish orthologs of key RAAS components, including Ace, Ace2, Slc6a19 (SARS-CoV-2 co-receptor), and the Angiotensin-related peptide cleaving enzymes Anpep (receptor for the common cold coronavirus HCoV-229E), and Dpp4 (receptor for the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus, MERS-CoV). Results identified specific vascular cell subtypes expressing Ang II receptors, apelin, and apelin receptor genes. These results identify genes and cell types to exploit zebrafish as a disease model for understanding mechanisms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Enterocytes , Gene Expression Regulation , Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics , Zebrafish Proteins , Zebrafish , Animals , /metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/virology , Humans , /metabolism , Zebrafish/genetics , Zebrafish/metabolism , Zebrafish/virology , Zebrafish Proteins/biosynthesis , Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
2.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(4): e13191, 2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068062

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the agent that causes COVID-19, invades epithelial cells, including those of the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, using angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) as a receptor. Subsequent inflammation can promote rapid virus clearance, but severe cases of COVID-19 are characterized by an inefficient immune response that fails to clear the infection. Using primary epithelial organoids from human colon, we explored how the central antiviral mediator IFN-γ, which is elevated in COVID-19, affects epithelial cell differentiation, ACE2 expression, and susceptibility to infection with SARS-CoV-2. In mouse and human colon, ACE2 is mainly expressed by surface enterocytes. Inducing enterocyte differentiation in organoid culture resulted in increased ACE2 production. IFN-γ treatment promoted differentiation into mature KRT20+ enterocytes expressing high levels of ACE2, increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and resulted in enhanced virus production in infected cells. Similarly, infection-induced epithelial interferon signaling promoted enterocyte maturation and enhanced ACE2 expression. We here reveal a mechanism by which IFN-γ-driven inflammatory responses induce a vulnerable epithelial state with robust replication of SARS-CoV-2, which may have an impact on disease outcome and virus transmission.


Subject(s)
/etiology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Models, Immunological , /genetics , Animals , /pathology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Colon/immunology , Colon/pathology , Colon/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/administration & dosage , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Mice , Organoids/immunology , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , /immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
3.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 10: 575559, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000068

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic is a great challenge for worldwide researchers in the human microbiota area because the mechanisms and long-term effects of the infection at the GI level are not yet deeply understood. In the current review, scientific literature including original research articles, clinical studies, epidemiological reports, and review-type articles concerning human intestinal infection with SARS-CoV-2 and the possible consequences on the microbiota were reviewed. Moreover, the following aspects pertaining to COVID-19 have also been discussed: transmission, resistance in the human body, the impact of nutritional status in relation to the intestinal microbiota, and the impact of comorbid metabolic disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBS), obesity, and type two diabetes (T2D). The articles investigated show that health, age, and nutritional status are associated with specific communities of bacterial species in the gut, which could influence the clinical course of COVID-19 infection. Fecal microbiota alterations were associated with fecal concentrations of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 severity. Patients suffering from metabolic and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are thought to be at a moderate-to-high risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2, indicating the direct implication of gut dysbiosis in COVID-19 severity. However, additional efforts are required to identify the initial GI symptoms of COVID-19 for possible early intervention.


Subject(s)
/microbiology , Dysbiosis/etiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Pandemics , /physiology , Animals , /epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/microbiology , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/virology , Feces/microbiology , Feces/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/microbiology , Humans , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/epidemiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/microbiology , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/microbiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/microbiology , Risk Factors , /pathogenicity
4.
Genes (Basel) ; 11(6)2020 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602760

ABSTRACT

There is increasing evidence of gastrointestinal (GI) infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We surveyed the co-expression of SARS-CoV-2 entry genes ACE2 and TMPRSS2 throughout the GI tract to assess potential sites of infection. Publicly available and in-house single-cell RNA-sequencing datasets from the GI tract were queried. Enterocytes from the small intestine and colonocytes showed the highest proportions of cells co-expressing ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Therefore, the lower GI tract represents the most likely site of SARS-CoV-2 entry leading to GI infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Enterocytes/metabolism , Lower Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Base Sequence , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Enterocytes/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Lower Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Sequence Analysis , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization
6.
Nat Med ; 26(7): 1077-1083, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260261

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-emerged in humans in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has since disseminated globally1,2. As of April 16, 2020, the confirmed case count of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had surpassed 2 million. Based on full-genome sequence analysis, SARS-CoV-2 shows high homology to SARS-related coronaviruses identified in horseshoe bats1,2. Here we show the establishment and characterization of expandable intestinal organoids derived from horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus sinicus species that can recapitulate bat intestinal epithelium. These bat enteroids are fully susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and sustain robust viral replication. Development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients with COVID-19 and detection of viral RNA in fecal specimens suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might cause enteric, in addition to respiratory, infection3,4. Here we demonstrate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in human intestinal organoids and isolation of infectious virus from the stool specimen of a patient with diarrheal COVID-19. Collectively, we established the first expandable organoid culture system of bat intestinal epithelium and present evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect bat intestinal cells. The robust SARS-CoV-2 replication in human intestinal organoids suggests that the human intestinal tract might be a transmission route of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Animals , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Child, Preschool , Chiroptera/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Intestines/pathology , Male , Organoids/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Vero Cells , Viral Load/genetics , Viral Load/methods , Viral Tropism/physiology
7.
Sci Immunol ; 5(47)2020 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260039

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal symptoms and fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 RNA are frequently observed in COVID-19 patients. However, it is unclear whether SARS-CoV-2 replicates in the human intestine and contributes to possible fecal-oral transmission. Here, we report productive infection of SARS-CoV-2 in ACE2+ mature enterocytes in human small intestinal enteroids. Expression of two mucosa-specific serine proteases, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4, facilitated SARS-CoV-2 spike fusogenic activity and promoted virus entry into host cells. We also demonstrate that viruses released into the intestinal lumen were inactivated by simulated human colonic fluid, and infectious virus was not recovered from the stool specimens of COVID-19 patients. Our results highlight the intestine as a potential site of SARS-CoV-2 replication, which may contribute to local and systemic illness and overall disease progression.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Animals , Cell Line , Duodenum/cytology , Enterocytes/pathology , Humans , Mice , Organoids/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Rotavirus/physiology , Vesiculovirus/genetics
8.
Science ; 369(6499): 50-54, 2020 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154670

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an influenza-like disease that is primarily thought to infect the lungs with transmission through the respiratory route. However, clinical evidence suggests that the intestine may present another viral target organ. Indeed, the SARS-CoV-2 receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is highly expressed on differentiated enterocytes. In human small intestinal organoids (hSIOs), enterocytes were readily infected by SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, as demonstrated by confocal and electron microscopy. Enterocytes produced infectious viral particles, whereas messenger RNA expression analysis of hSIOs revealed induction of a generic viral response program. Therefore, the intestinal epithelium supports SARS-CoV-2 replication, and hSIOs serve as an experimental model for coronavirus infection and biology.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Enterocytes/virology , Ileum/virology , Virus Replication , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , Cell Culture Techniques , Cell Differentiation , Cell Lineage , Cell Proliferation , Culture Media , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/ultrastructure , Gene Expression , Humans , Ileum/metabolism , Ileum/ultrastructure , Lung/virology , Male , Organoids , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS Virus/physiology
9.
Rev Esp Enferm Dig ; 112(5): 383-388, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-148632

ABSTRACT

Although SARS-CoV-2 may primarily enter the cells of the lungs, the small bowel may also be an important entry or interaction site, as the enterocytes are rich in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-2 receptors. The initial gastrointestinal symptoms that appear early during the course of Covid-19 support this hypothesis. Furthermore, SARS-CoV virions are preferentially released apically and not at the basement of the airway cells. Thus, in the setting of a productive infection of conducting airway epithelia, the apically released SARS-CoV may be removed by mucociliary clearance and gain access to the GI tract via a luminal exposure. In addition, post-mortem studies of mice infected by SARS-CoV have demonstrated diffuse damage to the GI tract, with the small bowel showing signs of enterocyte desquamation, edema, small vessel dilation and lymphocyte infiltration, as well as mesenteric nodes with severe hemorrhage and necrosis. Finally, the small bowel is rich in furin, a serine protease which can separate the S-spike of the coronavirus into two "pinchers" (S1 and 2). The separation of the S-spike into S1 and S2 is essential for the attachment of the virion to both the ACE receptor and the cell membrane. In this special review, we describe the interaction of SARS-CoV-2 with the cell and enterocyte and its potential clinical implications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Enterocytes/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Intestine, Small/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enterocytes/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Intestine, Small/cytology , Intestine, Small/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Angiotensin/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/physiology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology
10.
Viruses ; 12(4)2020 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-31709

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) have been reported to use aminopeptidase N (APN) as a cellular receptor. Recently, the role of APN as a receptor for PEDV has been questioned. In our study, the role of APN in PEDV and TGEV infections was studied in primary porcine enterocytes. After seven days of cultivation, 89% of enterocytes presented microvilli and showed a two- to five-fold higher susceptibility to PEDV and TGEV. A significant increase of PEDV and TGEV infection was correlated with a higher expression of APN, which was indicative that APN plays an important role in porcine coronavirus infections. However, PEDV and TGEV infected both APN positive and negative enterocytes. PEDV and TGEV Miller showed a higher infectivity in APN positive cells than in APN negative cells. In contrast, TGEV Purdue replicated better in APN negative cells. These results show that an additional receptor exists, different from APN for porcine coronaviruses. Subsequently, treatment of enterocytes with neuraminidase (NA) had no effect on infection efficiency of TGEV, implying that terminal cellular sialic acids (SAs) are no receptor determinants for TGEV. Treatment of TGEV with NA significantly enhanced the infection which shows that TGEV is masked by SAs.


Subject(s)
CD13 Antigens/metabolism , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/pathology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Sialic Acids/metabolism , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/metabolism , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Enterocytes/virology , Hydrocortisone/pharmacology , Insulin/pharmacology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Spermidine/pharmacology , Swine , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment , Virus Replication/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL