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1.
Science ; 372(6547): 1169-1175, 2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583231

ABSTRACT

Emergent resistance to all clinical antibiotics calls for the next generation of therapeutics. Here we report an effective antimicrobial strategy targeting the bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-mediated defense system. We identified cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) as the primary generator of H2S in two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and discovered small molecules that inhibit bacterial CSE. These inhibitors potentiate bactericidal antibiotics against both pathogens in vitro and in mouse models of infection. CSE inhibitors also suppress bacterial tolerance, disrupting biofilm formation and substantially reducing the number of persister bacteria that survive antibiotic treatment. Our results establish bacterial H2S as a multifunctional defense factor and CSE as a drug target for versatile antibiotic enhancers.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/antagonists & inhibitors , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydrogen Sulfide/metabolism , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/metabolism , Biofilms , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/chemistry , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/genetics , Cystathionine gamma-Lyase/metabolism , Drug Discovery , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Synergism , Drug Tolerance , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Mice , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/enzymology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/growth & development , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Small Molecule Libraries/metabolism , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/enzymology , Staphylococcus aureus/genetics , Staphylococcus aureus/growth & development
2.
Xenobiotica ; 52(2): 152-164, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541325

ABSTRACT

Emvododstat was identified as a potent inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia and COVID-19. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and drug interaction potentials of emvododstat.Emvododstat showed high binding to plasma protein with minimal distribution into blood cells in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human whole blood.O-Demethylation followed by glucuronidation appeared to be the major metabolic pathway in rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes. CYP2C8, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were involved in O-desmethyl emvododstat metabolite formation. Both emvododstat and O-desmethyl emvododstat inhibited CYP2D6 activity and induced CYP expression to different extents in vitro.Emvododstat and O-desmethyl emvododstat inhibited BCRP transporter activity but did not inhibit bile salt transporters and other efflux or uptake transporters. Neither emvododstat nor O-desmethyl emvododstat was a substrate for common efflux or uptake transporters investigated.Emvododstat is bioavailable in mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys following a single oral dose. The absorption was generally slow with the mean plasma Tmax ranging from 2 to 5 h; plasma exposure of O-desmethyl emvododstat was lower in rodents, but relatively higher in dogs and monkeys.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Microsomes, Liver , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily G, Member 2/metabolism , Animals , Carbamates , Carbazoles , Dogs , Drug Interactions , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Microsomes, Liver/metabolism , Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism , Rats
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470891

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, represents a new pathogen from the family of Coronaviridae that caused a global pandemic of COVID-19 disease. In the absence of effective antiviral drugs, research of novel therapeutic targets such as SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) becomes essential. This viral protein is without a human counterpart and thus represents a unique prospective drug target. However, in vitro biological evaluation testing on RdRp remains difficult and is not widely available. Therefore, we prepared a database of commercial small-molecule compounds and performed an in silico high-throughput virtual screening on the active site of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp using ensemble docking. We identified a novel thioether-amide or guanidine-linker class of potential RdRp inhibitors and calculated favorable binding free energies of representative hits by molecular dynamics simulations coupled with Linear Interaction Energy calculations. This innovative procedure maximized the respective phase-space sampling and yielded non-covalent inhibitors representing small optimizable molecules that are synthetically readily accessible, commercially available as well as suitable for further biological evaluation and mode of action studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Databases, Chemical , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Guanidine/chemistry , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfides/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
4.
ChemMedChem ; 16(23): 3548-3552, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400781

ABSTRACT

Over half a century since the description of the first antiviral drug, "old" re-emerging viruses and "new" emerging viruses still represent a serious threat to global health. Their high mutation rate and rapid selection of resistance toward common antiviral drugs, together with the increasing number of co-infections, make the war against viruses quite challenging. Herein we report a host-targeted approach, based on the inhibition of the lipid kinase PI4KIIIß, as a promising strategy for inhibiting the replication of multiple viruses hijacking this protein. We show that bithiazole inhibitors of PI4KIIIß block the replication of human rhinoviruses (hRV), Zika virus (ZIKV) and SARS-CoV-2 at low micromolar and sub-micromolar concentrations. However, while the anti-hRV/ZIKV activity can be directly linked to PI4KIIIß inhibition, the role of PI4KIIIß in SARS-CoV-2 entry/replication is debated.


Subject(s)
1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Rhinovirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thiazoles/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects , Zika Virus/physiology , 1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Drug Stability , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thiazoles/metabolism , Zika Virus/isolation & purification , Zika Virus Infection/pathology
5.
Pharmacol Res Perspect ; 9(1): e00691, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384293

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses represent global health threat. In this century, they have already caused two epidemics and one serious pandemic. Although, at present, there are no approved drugs and therapies for the treatment and prevention of human coronaviruses, several agents, FDA-approved, and preclinical, have shown in vitro and/or in vivo antiviral activity. An in-depth analysis of the current situation leads to the identification of several potential drugs that could have an impact on the fight against coronaviruses infections. In this review, we discuss the virology of human coronaviruses highlighting the main biological targets and summarize the current state-of-the-art of possible therapeutic options to inhibit coronaviruses infections. We mostly focus on FDA-approved and preclinical drugs targeting viral conserved elements.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Azoles/administration & dosage , Azoles/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Humans , Isoindoles , Naphthoquinones/administration & dosage , Naphthoquinones/metabolism , Organoselenium Compounds/administration & dosage , Organoselenium Compounds/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy
6.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387102

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
7.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4848, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354102

ABSTRACT

There is currently a lack of effective drugs to treat people infected with SARS-CoV-2, the cause of the global COVID-19 pandemic. The SARS-CoV-2 Non-structural protein 13 (NSP13) has been identified as a target for anti-virals due to its high sequence conservation and essential role in viral replication. Structural analysis reveals two "druggable" pockets on NSP13 that are among the most conserved sites in the entire SARS-CoV-2 proteome. Here we present crystal structures of SARS-CoV-2 NSP13 solved in the APO form and in the presence of both phosphate and a non-hydrolysable ATP analog. Comparisons of these structures reveal details of conformational changes that provide insights into the helicase mechanism and possible modes of inhibition. To identify starting points for drug development we have performed a crystallographic fragment screen against NSP13. The screen reveals 65 fragment hits across 52 datasets opening the way to structure guided development of novel antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Methyltransferases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Apoenzymes/chemistry , Apoenzymes/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Phosphates/chemistry , Phosphates/metabolism , Protein Conformation , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
8.
Biochemistry ; 60(24): 1869-1875, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263454

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug initially designed against the Ebola virus. The results obtained with it both in biochemical studies in vitro and in cell line assays in vivo were very promising, but it proved to be ineffective in clinical trials. Remdesivir exhibited far better efficacy when repurposed against SARS-CoV-2. The chemistry that accounts for this difference is the subject of this study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that remdesivir monophosphate (RMP)-containing RNA functions as a template at the polymerase site for the second run of RNA synthesis, and as mRNA at the decoding center for protein synthesis. Our hypothesis is supported by the observation that RMP can be incorporated into RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of both viruses, although some of the incorporated RMPs are subsequently removed by exoribonucleases. Furthermore, our hypothesis is consistent with the fact that RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 selects RMP for incorporation over AMP by 3-fold in vitro, and that RMP-added RNA can be rapidly extended, even though primer extension is often paused when the added RMP is translocated at the i + 3 position (with i the nascent base pair at an initial insertion site of RMP) or when the concentrations of the subsequent nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) are below their physiological concentrations. These observations have led to the hypothesis that remdesivir might be a delayed chain terminator. However, that hypothesis is challenged under physiological concentrations of NTPs by the observation that approximately three-quarters of RNA products efficiently overrun the pause.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Ebolavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/genetics , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Base Pairing , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism
9.
J Pharmacol Sci ; 147(1): 62-71, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240460

ABSTRACT

Owing to the urgent need for therapeutic interventions against the SARS-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, we employed an in silico approach to evaluate the SARS-CoV-2 inhibitory potential of newly synthesized imidazoles. The inhibitory potentials of the compounds against SARS-CoV-2 drug targets - main protease (Mpro), spike protein (Spro) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) were investigated through molecular docking analysis. The binding free energy of the protein-ligand complexes were estimated, pharmacophore models were generated and the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) properties of the compounds were determined. The compounds displayed various levels of binding affinities for the SARS-CoV-2 drug targets. Bisimidazole C2 scored highest against all the targets, with its aromatic rings including the two imidazole groups contributing to the binding. Among the phenyl-substituted 1H-imidazoles, C9 scored highest against all targets. C11 scored highest against Spro and C12 against Mpro and RdRp among the thiophene-imidazoles. The compounds interacted with HIS 41 - CYS 145 and GLU 288 - ASP 289 - GLU 290 of Mpro, ASN 501 of Spro receptor binding motif and some active site amino acids of RdRp. These novel imidazole compounds could be further developed as drug candidates against SARS-CoV-2 following lead optimization and experimental studies.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/methods , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Imidazoles/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Humans , Imidazoles/chemistry , Imidazoles/metabolism , Protein Binding/physiology , Protein Structure, Secondary , Protein Structure, Tertiary , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
10.
ChemistryOpen ; 10(5): 593-599, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233225

ABSTRACT

Scientists all over the world are facing a challenging task of finding effective therapeutics for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). One of the fastest ways of finding putative drug candidates is the use of computational drug discovery approaches. The purpose of the current study is to retrieve natural compounds that have obeyed to drug-like properties as potential inhibitors. Computational molecular modelling techniques were employed to discover compounds with potential SARS-CoV-2 inhibition properties. Accordingly, the InterBioScreen (IBS) database was obtained and was prepared by minimizing the compounds. To the resultant compounds, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) and Lipinski's Rule of Five was applied to yield drug-like compounds. The obtained compounds were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation studies to evaluate their stabilities. In the current article, we have employed the docking based virtual screening method using InterBioScreen (IBS) natural compound database yielding two compounds has potential hits. These compounds have demonstrated higher binding affinity scores than the reference compound together with good pharmacokinetic properties. Additionally, the identified hits have displayed stable interaction results inferred by molecular dynamics simulation results. Taken together, we advocate the use of two natural compounds, STOCK1N-71493 and STOCK1N-45683 as SARS-CoV-2 treatment regime.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Biological Products/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Biological Products/pharmacokinetics , Drug Discovery , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Methyltransferases , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Software , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/pharmacokinetics
11.
Chem Biol Interact ; 343: 109480, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193249

ABSTRACT

Polyphenolics and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles are two of the most potent bioactive classes of compounds in medicinal chemistry, since both are known for their diverse pharmacological activities in humans. One of their prominent activities is the antimicrobial/antiviral activities, which are much apparent when the key functional structural moieties of both of them meet into the same compounds. The current COVID-19 pandemic motivated us to computationally screen and evaluate our library of previously-synthesized 2-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazoles against the major SARS-CoV-2 protein targets. Interestingly, few ligands showed promising low binding free energies (potent inhibitory interactions/affinities) with the active sites of some coronaviral-2 enzymes, specially the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nCoV-RdRp). One of them was 5,5'-{5,5'-[(1R,2R)-1,2-dihydroxyethane-1,2-diyl]bis(1,3,4-oxadiazole-5,2-diyl)}dibenzene-1,2,3-triol (Taroxaz-104), which showed significantly low binding energies (-10.60 and -9.10 kcal/mol) with nCoV-RdRp-RNA and nCoV-RdRp alone, respectively. These binding energies are even considerably lower than those of remdesivir potent active metabolite GS-443902 (which showed -9.20 and -7.90 kcal/mol with the same targets, respectively). Further computational molecular investigation revealed that Taroxaz-104 molecule strongly inhibits one of the potential active sites of nCoV-RdRp (the one with which GS-443902 molecule mainly interacts), since it interacts with at least seven major active amino acid residues of its predicted pocket. The successful repurposing of Taroxaz-104 has been achieved after the promising results of the anti-COVID-19 biological assay were obtained, as the data showed that Taroxaz-104 exhibited very significant anti-COVID-19 activities (anti-SARS-CoV-2 EC50 = 0.42 µM) with interesting effectiveness against the new strains/variants of SARS-CoV-2. Further investigations for the development of Taroxaz-104 and its coming polyphenolic 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives as anti-COVID-19 drugs, through in vivo bioevaluations and clinical trials research, are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Oxadiazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Catalytic Domain , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Drug Repositioning , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Docking Simulation , Oxadiazoles/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Vero Cells
12.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 727-736, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123193

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease COVID-19, caused by the virus SARS CoV-2, has exerted a significant unprecedented economic and medical crisis, in addition to its impact on the daily life and health care systems all over the world. Regrettably, no vaccines or drugs are currently available for this new critical emerging human disease. Joining the global fight against COVID-19, in this study we aim at identifying a potential novel inhibitor for SARS COV-2 2'-O-methyltransferase (nsp16) which is one of the most attractive targets in the virus life cycle, responsible for the viral RNA protection via a cap formation process. Firstly, nsp16 enzyme bound to Sinefungin was retrieved from the protein data bank (PDB ID: 6WKQ), then, a 3D pharmacophore model was constructed to be applied to screen 48 Million drug-like compounds of the Zinc database. This resulted in only 24 compounds which were subsequently docked into the enzyme. The best four score-ordered hits from the docking outcome exhibited better scores compared to Sinefungin. Finally, three molecular dynamics (MD) simulation experiments for 150 ns were carried out as a refinement step for our proposed approach. The MD and MM-PBSA outputs revealed compound 11 as the best potential nsp16 inhibitor herein identified, as it displayed a better stability and average binding free energy for the ligand-enzyme complex compared to Sinefungin.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Databases, Protein , Drug Stability , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Kinetics , Methyltransferases , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
13.
Nat Struct Mol Biol ; 28(3): 319-325, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118814

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by nonstop infections of SARS-CoV-2 has continued to ravage many countries worldwide. Here we report that suramin, a 100-year-old drug, is a potent inhibitor of the SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and acts by blocking the binding of RNA to the enzyme. In biochemical assays, suramin and its derivatives are at least 20-fold more potent than remdesivir, the currently approved nucleotide drug for treatment of COVID-19. The 2.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the viral RdRp bound to suramin reveals two binding sites. One site directly blocks the binding of the RNA template strand and the other site clashes with the RNA primer strand near the RdRp catalytic site, thus inhibiting RdRp activity. Suramin blocks viral replication in Vero E6 cells, although the reasons underlying this effect are likely various. Our results provide a structural mechanism for a nonnucleotide inhibitor of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Suramin/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Binding Sites , Catalytic Domain , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Suramin/chemistry , Suramin/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
J Phys Chem B ; 124(47): 10641-10652, 2020 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943842

ABSTRACT

Antiviral drug therapy against SARS-CoV-2 is not yet established and posing a serious global health issue. Remdesivir is the first antiviral compound approved by the US FDA for the SARS-CoV-2 treatment for emergency use, targeting RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) enzyme. In this work, we have examined the action of remdesivir and other two ligands screened from the library of nucleotide analogues using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. The MD simulations have been performed for all the ligand-bound RdRp complexes for the 30 ns time scale. This is one of the earlier reports to perform the MD simulations studies using the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp crystal structure (PDB ID 7BTF). The MD trajectories were analyzed and Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) calculations were performed to calculate the binding free energy. The binding energy data reveal that compound-17 (-59.6 kcal/mol) binds more strongly as compared to compound-8 (-46.3 kcal/mol) and remdesivir (-29.7 kcal/mol) with RdRp. The detailed analysis of trajectories shows that the remdesivir binds in the catalytic site and forms a hydrogen bond with the catalytic residues from 0 to 0.46 ns. Compound-8 binds in the catalytic site but does not form direct hydrogen bonds with catalytic residues. Compound-17 showed the formation of hydrogen bonds with catalytic residues throughout the simulation process. The MD simulation results such as hydrogen bonding, the center of mass distance analysis, snapshots at a different time interval, and binding energy suggest that compound-17 binds strongly with RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 and has the potential to develop as a new antiviral against COVID-19. Further, the frontier molecular orbital analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) iso-surface analysis using DFT calculations shed light on the superior binding of compound-17 with RdRp compared to remdesivir and compound-8. The computed as well as the experimentally reported pharmacokinetics and toxicity parameters of compound-17 is encouraging and therefore can be one of the potential candidates for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/toxicity , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/toxicity , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Caco-2 Cells , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Density Functional Theory , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Enzyme Inhibitors/toxicity , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Models, Chemical , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Thermodynamics
15.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3717, 2020 07 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680539

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic. 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase) is one of the enzymes of this virus that is a potential target for antiviral therapy as it is crucial for RNA cap formation; an essential process for viral RNA stability. This MTase function is associated with the nsp16 protein, which requires a cofactor, nsp10, for its proper activity. Here we show the crystal structure of the nsp10-nsp16 complex bound to the pan-MTase inhibitor sinefungin in the active site. Our structural comparisons reveal low conservation of the MTase catalytic site between Zika and SARS-CoV-2 viruses, but high conservation of the MTase active site between SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV viruses; these data suggest that the preparation of MTase inhibitors targeting several coronaviruses - but not flaviviruses - should be feasible. Together, our data add to important information for structure-based drug discovery.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Crystallography, X-Ray , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Chemical , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Caps , RNA Stability , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism
16.
J Phys Chem B ; 124(32): 6955-6962, 2020 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611394

ABSTRACT

Starting from late 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a once-in-a-century pandemic with deadly consequences, which urgently calls for new treatments, cures, and supporting apparatuses. Recently, because of its positive results in clinical trials, remdesivir was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat COVID-19 through Emergency Use Authorization. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulations and free energy perturbation methods to study the inhibition mechanism of remdesivir to its target SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We first constructed the homology model of this polymerase based on a previously available structure of SARS-CoV NSP12 RdRp (with a sequence identity of 95.8%). We then built a putative preinsertion binding structure by aligning the remdesivir + RdRp complex to the ATP bound poliovirus RdRp without the RNA template. The putative binding structure was further optimized with molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting stable preinsertion state of remdesivir appeared to form hydrogen bonds with the RNA template when aligned with the newly solved cryo-EM structure of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp. The relative binding free energy between remdesivir and ATP was calculated to be -2.80 ± 0.84 kcal/mol, where remdesivir bound much stronger to SARS-CoV-2 RdRp than the natural substrate ATP. The ∼100-fold improvement in the Kd from remdesivir over ATP indicates an effective replacement of ATP in blocking of the RdRp preinsertion site. Key residues D618, S549, and R555 are found to be the contributors to the binding affinity of remdesivir. These findings suggest that remdesivir can potentially act as a SARS-CoV-2 RNA-chain terminator, effectively stopping its RNA replication, with key residues also identified for future lead optimization and/or drug resistance studies.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Hydrogen Bonding , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Thermodynamics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
17.
Science ; 368(6498): 1499-1504, 2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154668

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global crisis. Replication of SARS-CoV-2 requires the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) enzyme, a target of the antiviral drug remdesivir. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp, both in the apo form at 2.8-angstrom resolution and in complex with a 50-base template-primer RNA and remdesivir at 2.5-angstrom resolution. The complex structure reveals that the partial double-stranded RNA template is inserted into the central channel of the RdRp, where remdesivir is covalently incorporated into the primer strand at the first replicated base pair, and terminates chain elongation. Our structures provide insights into the mechanism of viral RNA replication and a rational template for drug design to combat the viral infection.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Models, Molecular , Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
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