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1.
Nature ; 610(7931): 381-388, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050416

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged at the end of 2019 and caused the devastating global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in part because of its ability to effectively suppress host cell responses1-3. In rare cases, viral proteins dampen antiviral responses by mimicking critical regions of human histone proteins4-8, particularly those containing post-translational modifications required for transcriptional regulation9-11. Recent work has demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 markedly disrupts host cell epigenetic regulation12-14. However, how SARS-CoV-2 controls the host cell epigenome and whether it uses histone mimicry to do so remain unclear. Here we show that the SARS-CoV-2 protein encoded by ORF8 (ORF8) functions as a histone mimic of the ARKS motifs in histone H3 to disrupt host cell epigenetic regulation. ORF8 is associated with chromatin, disrupts regulation of critical histone post-translational modifications and promotes chromatin compaction. Deletion of either the ORF8 gene or the histone mimic site attenuates the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to disrupt host cell chromatin, affects the transcriptional response to infection and attenuates viral genome copy number. These findings demonstrate a new function of ORF8 and a mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 disrupts host cell epigenetic regulation. Further, this work provides a molecular basis for the finding that SARS-CoV-2 lacking ORF8 is associated with decreased severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epigenesis, Genetic , Histones , Host Microbial Interactions , Molecular Mimicry , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Proteins , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Chromatin/genetics , Chromatin/metabolism , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , Epigenome/genetics , Histones/chemistry , Histones/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
2.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 206(3): 242-244, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1986537
3.
Dis Model Mech ; 14(1)2021 01 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910406

ABSTRACT

Human lifespan is now longer than ever and, as a result, modern society is getting older. Despite that, the detailed mechanisms behind the ageing process and its impact on various tissues and organs remain obscure. In general, changes in DNA, RNA and protein structure throughout life impair their function. Haematopoietic ageing refers to the age-related changes affecting a haematopoietic system. Aged blood cells display different functional aberrations depending on their cell type, which might lead to the development of haematologic disorders, including leukaemias, anaemia or declining immunity. In contrast to traditional bulk assays, which are not suitable to dissect cell-to-cell variation, single-cell-level analysis provides unprecedented insight into the dynamics of age-associated changes in blood. In this Review, we summarise recent studies that dissect haematopoietic ageing at the single-cell level. We discuss what cellular changes occur during haematopoietic ageing at the genomic, transcriptomic, epigenomic and metabolomic level, and provide an overview of the benefits of investigating those changes with single-cell precision. We conclude by considering the potential clinical applications of single-cell techniques in geriatric haematology, focusing on the impact on haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the elderly and infection studies, including recent COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Aging/physiology , Hematopoietic System/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Aging/genetics , Animals , Bone Marrow/physiology , DNA Damage , Epigenome , Glycolysis , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Mutation , Transcriptome
4.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(D1): D27-D38, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758797

ABSTRACT

The National Genomics Data Center (NGDC), part of the China National Center for Bioinformation (CNCB), provides a family of database resources to support global research in both academia and industry. With the explosively accumulated multi-omics data at ever-faster rates, CNCB-NGDC is constantly scaling up and updating its core database resources through big data archive, curation, integration and analysis. In the past year, efforts have been made to synthesize the growing data and knowledge, particularly in single-cell omics and precision medicine research, and a series of resources have been newly developed, updated and enhanced. Moreover, CNCB-NGDC has continued to daily update SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences, variants, haplotypes and literature. Particularly, OpenLB, an open library of bioscience, has been established by providing easy and open access to a substantial number of abstract texts from PubMed, bioRxiv and medRxiv. In addition, Database Commons is significantly updated by cataloguing a full list of global databases, and BLAST tools are newly deployed to provide online sequence search services. All these resources along with their services are publicly accessible at https://ngdc.cncb.ac.cn.


Subject(s)
Databases, Factual , Animals , China , Computational Biology , Databases, Genetic , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Dogs , Epigenome , Genome, Human , Genome, Viral , Genomics , Humans , Methylation , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/pathology , Regeneration , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Single-Cell Analysis , Software , Synthetic Biology
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(19): 5947-5964, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478937

ABSTRACT

The recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak has resulted in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic worldwide, affecting millions of lives. Although vaccines are presently made available, and vaccination drive is in progress to immunize a larger population; still the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and related mortality is persistent amid threats of the third wave of the ongoing pandemic. In the scenario of unavailability of robust and efficient treatment modalities, it becomes essential to understand the mechanism of action of the virus and deeply study the molecular mechanisms (both at the virus level and the host level) underlying the infection processes. Recent studies have shown that coronaviruses (CoVs) cause-specific epigenetic changes in the host cells to create a conducive microenvironment for replicating, assembling, and spreading. Epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to various aspects of the SARS-CoV-2 multiplication cycle, like expressing cytokine genes, viral receptor ACE2, and implicating different histone modifications. For SARS-CoV-2 infection, viral proteins are physically associated with various host proteins resulting in numerous interactions between epigenetic enzymes (i.e., histone deacetylases, bromodomain-containing proteins). The involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the virus life cycle and the host immune responses to control infection result in epigenetic factors recognized as emerging prognostic COVID-19 biomarkers and epigenetic modulators as robust therapeutic targets to curb COVID-19. Therefore, this narrative review aimed to summarize and discuss the various epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression and how these mechanisms are altered in the host cells during coronavirus infection. We also discuss the opportunities to exploit these epigenetic changes as therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Epigenetic alterations and regulation play a pivotal role at various levels of coronavirus infection: entry, replication/transcription, and the process of maturation of viral proteins. Coronaviruses modulate the host epigenome to escape the host immune mechanisms. Therefore, host epigenetic alterations induced by CoVs can be considered to develop targeted therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics , Epigenome , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans
6.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(8)2021 07 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335030

ABSTRACT

DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns over time at 1146 CpGs on coronavirus-related genes were assessed to understand whether the varying differences in susceptibility, symptoms, and the outcomes of the SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and young adults could be explained through epigenetic alterations in a host cell's transcriptional apparatus to coronaviruses. DNAm data from the Isle of Wight birth cohort (IOWBC) at birth, 10, 18, and 26 years of age were included. Linear mixed models with repeated measurements stratified by sex were used to examine temporal patterns, and cluster analysis was performed to identify CpGs following similar patterns. CpGs on autosomes and sex chromosomes were analyzed separately. The association of identified CpGs and expression of their genes were evaluated. Pathway enrichment analyses of the genes was conducted at FDR = 0.05. DNAm at 635 of the 1146 CpGs on autosomes showed statistically significant time effects (FDR = 0.05). The 635 CpGs were classified into five clusters with each representing a unique temporal pattern of DNAm. Of the 29 CpGs on sex chromosomes, DNAm at seven CpGs in males and eight CpGs in females showed time effects (FDR = 0.05). Sex-specific and non-specific associations of DNAm with gene expression were found at 24 and 93 CpGs, respectively. Genes which mapped the 643 CpGs represent 460 biological processes. We suggest that the observed variability in DNAm with advancing age may partially explain differing susceptibility, disease severity, and mortality of coronavirus infections among different age groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , DNA Methylation , Adolescent , Adult , Child , CpG Islands , Epigenome , Female , Humans , Male
7.
Ann Hum Genet ; 85(6): 221-234, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286650

ABSTRACT

In the early 2000s, emerging SARS-CoV-2, which is highly pathogenic, posed a great threat to public health. During COVID-19, epigenetic regulation is deemed to be an important part of the pathophysiology and illness severity. Using the Illumina Infinium Methylation EPIC BeadChip (850 K), we investigated genome-wide differences in DNA methylation between healthy subjects and COVID-19 patients with different disease severities. We conducted a combined analysis and selected 35 "marker" genes that could indicate a SARS-CoV-2 infection, including 12 (ATHL1, CHN2, CHST15, CPLX2, CRHR2, DCAKD, GNAI2, HECW1, HYAL1, MIR510, PDE11A, and SMG6) situated in the promoter region. The functions and pathways of differentially methylated genes were enriched in biological processes, signal transduction, and the immune system. In the "Severe versus Mild" group, differentially methylated genes, after eliminating duplicates, were used for PPI analyses. The four hub genes (GNG7, GNAS, PRKCZ, and PRKAG2) that had the highest degree of nodes were identified and among them, GNG7 and GNAS genes expressions were also downregulated in the severe group in sequencing results. Above all, the results suggest that GNG7 and GNAS may play a non-ignorable role in the progression of COVID-19. In conclusion, the identified key genes and related pathways in the current study can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of COVID-19 and may provide possibilities for specific treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , DNA Methylation/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Chromogranins/genetics , CpG Islands/genetics , Epigenome/genetics , Female , GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gs/genetics , GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits/genetics , Genetic Markers/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
8.
EBioMedicine ; 66: 103339, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184942

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), exhibit a wide spectrum of disease behaviour. Since DNA methylation has been implicated in the regulation of viral infections and the immune system, we performed an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) to identify candidate loci regulated by this epigenetic mark that could be involved in the onset of COVID-19 in patients without comorbidities. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 407 confirmed COVID-19 patients ≤ 61 years of age and without comorbidities, 194 (47.7%) of whom had mild symptomatology that did not involve hospitalization and 213 (52.3%) had a severe clinical course that required respiratory support. The set of cases was divided into discovery (n = 207) and validation (n = 200) cohorts, balanced for age and sex of individuals. We analysed the DNA methylation status of 850,000 CpG sites in these patients. FINDINGS: The DNA methylation status of 44 CpG sites was associated with the clinical severity of COVID-19. Of these loci, 23 (52.3%) were located in 20 annotated coding genes. These genes, such as the inflammasome component Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) and the Major Histocompatibility Complex, class I C (HLA-C) candidates, were mainly involved in the response of interferon to viral infection. We used the EWAS-identified sites to establish a DNA methylation signature (EPICOVID) that is associated with the severity of the disease. INTERPRETATION: We identified DNA methylation sites as epigenetic susceptibility loci for respiratory failure in COVID-19 patients. These candidate biomarkers, combined with other clinical, cellular and genetic factors, could be useful in the clinical stratification and management of patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2. FUNDING: The Unstoppable campaign of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Foundation, the Cellex Foundation and the CERCA Programme/Generalitat de Catalunya.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , DNA Methylation , Epigenome , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Adult , COVID-19/etiology , Cohort Studies , CpG Islands , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Respiratory Insufficiency/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Spain , Young Adult
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 625881, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133910

ABSTRACT

T cells play a critical role in coronavirus diseases. How they do so in COVID-19 may be revealed by analyzing the epigenetic chromatin accessibility of cis- and trans-regulatory elements and creating transcriptomic immune profiles. We performed single-cell assay for transposase-accessible chromatin (scATAC) and single-cell RNA (scRNA) sequencing (seq) on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of severely ill/critical patients (SCPs) infected with COVID-19, moderate patients (MPs), and healthy volunteer controls (HCs). About 76,570 and 107,862 single cells were used, respectively, for analyzing the characteristics of chromatin accessibility and transcriptomic immune profiles by the application of scATAC-seq (nine cases) and scRNA-seq (15 cases). The scATAC-seq detected 28,535 different peaks in the three groups; among these peaks, 41.6 and 10.7% were located in the promoter and enhancer regions, respectively. Compared to HCs, among the peak-located genes in the total T cells and its subsets, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells, from SCPs and MPs were enriched with inflammatory pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway. The motifs of TBX21 were less accessible in the CD4+ T cells of SCPs compared with those in MPs. Furthermore, the scRNA-seq showed that the proportion of T cells, especially the CD4+ T cells, was decreased in SCPs and MPs compared with those in HCs. Transcriptomic results revealed that histone-related genes, and inflammatory genes, such as NFKBIA, S100A9, and PIK3R1, were highly expressed in the total T cells, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells, both in the cases of SCPs and MPs. In the CD4+ T cells, decreased T helper-1 (Th1) cells were observed in SCPs and MPs. In the CD8+T cells, activation markers, such as CD69 and HLA class II genes (HLA-DRA, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DRB5), were significantly upregulated in SCPs. An integrated analysis of the data from scATAC-seq and scRNA-seq showed some consistency between the approaches. Cumulatively, we have generated a landscape of chromatin epigenetic status and transcriptomic immune profiles of T cells in patients with COVID-19. This has provided a deeper dissection of the characteristics of the T cells involved at a higher resolution than from previously obtained data merely by the scRNA-seq analysis. Our data led us to suggest that the T-cell inflammatory states accompanied with defective functions in the CD4+ T cells of SCPs may be the key factors for determining the pathogenesis of and recovery from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/physiology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , Chromatin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , Calgranulin B/genetics , Chromatin/genetics , Class Ia Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/genetics , Epigenome/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/genetics , Inflammation/genetics , Lymphocyte Activation , NF-KappaB Inhibitor alpha/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Transposases/metabolism , Up-Regulation
11.
J Clin Invest ; 131(3)2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066997

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the globe, researchers have been trying to understand its origin, life cycle, and pathogenesis. There is a striking variability in the phenotypic response to infection with SARS-CoV-2 that may reflect differences in host genetics and/or immune response. It is known that the human epigenome is influenced by ethnicity, age, lifestyle, and environmental factors, including previous viral infections. This Review examines the influence of viruses on the host epigenome. We describe general lessons and methodologies that can be used to understand how the virus evades the host immune response. We consider how variation in the epigenome may contribute to heterogeneity in the response to SARS-CoV-2 and may identify a precision medicine approach to treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epigenome , Genome, Viral , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
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