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1.
Rinsho Shinkeigaku ; 63(2): 105-107, 2023.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321662
3.
Epilepsy Behav ; 143: 109223, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298031

ABSTRACT

Growing research has examined the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with epilepsy. There are no published national estimates of COVID-19 vaccination status among U.S. adults with active epilepsy. The purpose of this study is to use 2021 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data to examine select COVID-19-related outcomes by epilepsy status in a nationally representative sample of US adults. The study sample met the criteria for operationalization of epilepsy status (i.e., active epilepsy vs. no epilepsy history) and select questions related to COVID-19 testing, vaccination, delays in care, or experience with virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. All analyses accounted for the NHIS complex sample design and response sampling weights. Our study found that in 2021 receipt of one COVID-19 vaccination among U.S. adults with active epilepsy was generally similar to that among adults without a history of epilepsy. By age, adults aged 18-44 years with active epilepsy (27.0%) were significantly less likely to have reported receiving two COVID-19 vaccinations compared with their peers with no epilepsy history (39.1%). Compared to adults with no epilepsy history, adults with active epilepsy reported similar experiences and outcomes regarding COVID-19 testing and obtaining health care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study provides baseline estimates of select COVID-19 outcomes among US adults with active epilepsy to guide interventions and additional studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adult , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vaccination , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy
4.
Epilepsy Behav ; 142: 109146, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295303

ABSTRACT

The purpose of our study was to explore how people with epilepsy fared during two of the most stringent 4-month society-wide COVID-19-related pandemic restrictions in Ireland, in 2020 and one year later in 2021. This was in the context of their seizure control, lifestyle factors, and access to epilepsy-related healthcare services. A 14-part questionnaire was administered to adults with epilepsy during virtual specialist epilepsy clinics in a University Hospital in Dublin, Ireland at the end of the two lockdowns. People with epilepsy were questioned on their epilepsy control, lifestyle factors, and quality of epilepsy-related medical care, compared to pre-COVID times. The study sample consisted of two separate cohorts of those diagnosed with epilepsy (100 (51.8%) in 2020, and 93 (48.2%) in 2021, with similar baseline characteristics. There was no significant change in seizure control or lifestyle factors from 2020 to 2021, except for deterioration in anti-seizure medication (ASM) adherence in 2021 compared to 2020 (p = 0.028). There was no correlation between ASM adherence and other lifestyle factors. Over the two years, poor seizure control was significantly associated with poor sleep (p < 0.001) and average seizure frequency in a month (p = 0.007). We concluded that there was no significant difference between seizure control or lifestyle factors between the two most stringent lockdowns in Ireland, in 2020 and 2021. Furthermore, people with epilepsy reported that throughout the lockdowns access to services was well maintained, and they felt well supported by their services. Contrary to the popular opinion that COVID lockdowns greatly affected patients with chronic diseases, we found that those with epilepsy attending our service remained largely stable, optimistic, and healthy during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Epilepsy Behav ; 142: 109211, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305993

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The on-scene time of Emergency Medical Services (EMS), including time for hospital selection, is critical for people in an emergency. However, the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) led to longer delays in providing immediate care for individuals with non-COVID-19-related emergencies, such as epileptic seizures. This study aimed to examine factors associated with on-scene time delays for people with epilepsy (PWE) with seizures needing immediate amelioration. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study for PWE transported by EMS between 2016 and 2021. We used data from the Hiroshima City Fire Service Bureau database, divided into three study periods: "Pre period", the period before the COVID pandemic (2016-2019); "Early period", the early period of the COVID pandemic (2020); and "Middle period", the middle period of the COVID pandemic (2021). We performed linear regression modeling to identify factors associated with changes in EMS on-scene time for PWE during each period. In addition, we estimated the rate of total EMS call volume required to maintain the same on-scene time for PWE transported by EMS during the pandemic expansion. RESULTS: Among 2,205 PWE transported by EMS, significant differences in mean age and prevalence of impaired consciousness were found between pandemic periods. Total EMS call volume per month for all causes during the same month <5,000 (-0.55 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.02 - -0.08, p = 0.022) and transport during the Early period (-1.88 min, 95%CI -2.75 - -1.00, p < 0.001) decreased on-scene time, whereas transport during the Middle period (1.58 min, 95%CI 0.70 - 2.46, p < 0.001) increased on-scene time for PWE transported by EMS. The rate of total EMS call volume was estimated as 0.81 (95%CI -0.04 - 1.07) during the expansion phase of the pandemic to maintain the same degree of on-scene time for PWE transported by EMS before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: On-scene time delays on PWE in critical care settings were observed during the Middle period. When the pandemic expanded, the EMS system required resource allocation to maintain EMS for time-sensitive illnesses such as epileptic seizures. Timely system changes are critical to meet dramatic social changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Epilepsy , Humans , Emergencies , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy
6.
Can J Neurol Sci ; 48(1): 9-24, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278901

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Albeit primarily a disease of respiratory tract, the 2019 coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) has been found to have causal association with a plethora of neurological, neuropsychiatric and psychological effects. This review aims to analyze them with a discussion of evolving therapeutic recommendations. METHODS: PubMed and Google Scholar were searched from 1 January 2020 to 30 May 2020 with the following key terms: "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2", "pandemic", "neuro-COVID", "stroke-COVID", "epilepsy-COVID", "COVID-encephalopathy", "SARS-CoV-2-encephalitis", "SARS-CoV-2-rhabdomyolysis", "COVID-demyelinating disease", "neurological manifestations", "psychosocial manifestations", "treatment recommendations", "COVID-19 and therapeutic changes", "psychiatry", "marginalised", "telemedicine", "mental health", "quarantine", "infodemic" and "social media". A few newspaper reports related to COVID-19 and psychosocial impacts have also been added as per context. RESULTS: Neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations of COVID-19 are abundant. Clinical features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement are evident. These have been categorically analyzed briefly with literature support. Most of the psychological effects are secondary to pandemic-associated regulatory, socioeconomic and psychosocial changes. CONCLUSION: Neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations of this disease are only beginning to unravel. This demands a wide index of suspicion for prompt diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 to prevent further complications and mortality.


Les impacts neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques d'une infection à la COVID-19. CONTEXTE: Bien qu'il s'agisse principalement d'une maladie des voies respiratoires, la maladie infectieuse à coronavirus apparue en 2019 (COVID-19) s'est avérée avoir un lien de causalité avec une pléthore d'impacts d'ordre neurologique, neuropsychiatrique et psychologique. Cette étude entend donc analyser ces impacts tout en discutant l'évolution des recommandations thérapeutiques se rapportant à cette maladie. MÉTHODES: Les bases de données PubMed et Google Scholar ont été interrogées entre les 1er janvier et 30 mai 2020. Les termes clés suivants ont été utilisés : « COVID-19 ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ¼, « Pandémie ¼, « Neuro ­ COVID ¼, « AVC ­ COVID ¼, « Épilepsie ­ COVID ¼, « COVID ­ encéphalopathie ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ­ encéphalite ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ­ rhabdomyolyse ¼, « COVID ­ maladie démyélinisante ¼, « Manifestations neurologiques ¼, « Manifestations psychosociales ¼, « Recommandations thérapeutiques ¼, « COVID-19 et changement thérapeutiques ¼, « Psychiatrie ¼, « Marginalisés ¼, « Télémédecine ¼, « Santé mentale ¼, « Quarantaine ¼, « Infodémique ¼ et « Médias sociaux ¼. De plus, quelques articles de journaux relatifs à la pandémie de COVID-19 et à ses impacts psychosociaux ont également été ajoutés en fonction du contexte. RÉSULTATS: Il appert que les manifestations neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques des infections à la COVID-19 sont nombreuses. Les caractéristiques cliniques d'une implication des systèmes nerveux central et périphérique sautent désormais aux yeux. Ces caractéristiques ont fait l'objet d'une brève analyse systématique à l'aide de publications scientifiques. En outre, la plupart des impacts d'ordre psychologique de cette pandémie se sont révélés moins apparents que les changements réglementaires, socioéconomiques et psychosociaux. CONCLUSION: Les manifestations neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques de cette maladie ne font que commencer à être élucidées. Cela exige donc une capacité accrue de vigilance en vue d'un diagnostic rapide, et ce, afin de prévenir des complications additionnelles et une mortalité accrue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Ageusia/etiology , Ageusia/physiopathology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Anosmia/etiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Brain Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cerebellar Ataxia/etiology , Cerebellar Ataxia/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Delivery of Health Care , Demyelinating Diseases/therapy , Disease Management , Dizziness/etiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Epilepsy/therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Headache/etiology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Hypoxia, Brain/physiopathology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Meningoencephalitis/etiology , Meningoencephalitis/physiopathology , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Muscular Diseases/physiopathology , Myelitis, Transverse/etiology , Myelitis, Transverse/physiopathology , Myoclonus/etiology , Myoclonus/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Polyneuropathies/etiology , Polyneuropathies/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/etiology , Seizures/physiopathology , Stroke/therapy , Viral Tropism
7.
Neurol Clin ; 40(4): 717-727, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268066

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is a method of health care delivery well suited for epilepsy care, where there is an insufficient supply of trained specialists. The telemedicine "Hub and Spoke" approach allows patients to visit their local health clinic ('Spokes') to establish appropriate care and monitoring for their seizure disorder or epilepsy, and remotely connect with epileptologists or neurologists at centralized centers of expertise ('Hubs'). The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an expansion of telemedicine capabilities and use, with favorable patient and provider experience and outcomes, allowing for its wide scale adoption beyond COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/therapy
9.
Epilepsy Res ; 188: 107035, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2068965

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Researchers have called for innovative tailored interventions to address specific challenges to physical activity (PA) engagement for young people with epilepsy (YPE). Working with YPE and their parents, this study aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to adoption and maintenance of PA among YPE prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Ten YPE (all female) and their 13 caregivers, and five additional caregivers to males (N = 18; 72% mothers), completed virtual focus group sessions prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Trained Child Life specialists asked questions about barriers and facilitators of PA engagement experienced by YWE, which included a specific focus on the impact of epilepsy. RESULTS: Thematic analysis of the data identified both epilepsy-specific and generic themes that impact PA participation among YPE. These included: (i) epilepsy experience/impact and accommodation; (ii) safety precautions; (iii) concern about seizures; (iv) social connections and acceptance; (v) parent and family support; (vi) intrapersonal self-regulation and motivation; (vii) health benefits; and (viii) key factors in common with all youth. CONCLUSION: This study provides valuable insight into diverse social-ecological health factors that impact PA participation among YPE from two key stakeholder perspectives (YPE and their caregivers). By understanding these lived experiences, providers can better tailor individual support for YPE and their families to foster and maintain a healthy active lifestyle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adolescent , Child , Male , Humans , Female , Pandemics , Parents , Epilepsy/therapy , Focus Groups
10.
Epilepsy Behav ; 130: 108673, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health research agendas are often set by researchers or by industry and may not reflect the needs and priorities of end users. This priority-setting partnership (PSP) for epilepsy was undertaken to identify the most pressing unanswered questions about epilepsy and seizures from the perspective of people with epilepsy (PWE) and their care providers. METHODS: Using the methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance (JLA), evidence uncertainties were gathered via online surveys from stakeholders across Canada. Submissions were formed into summary questions and checked against existing evidence to determine if they were true uncertainties. Verified uncertainties were then ranked by patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers and a final workshop was held to reach a consensus on the top 10 priorities. RESULTS: The final top 10 list reflects the priority areas of focus for research as identified by the Canadian epilepsy community, including genetic markers for diagnosis and treatment, concerns about living with the long-term effects of epilepsy, and addressing knowledge gaps in etiology and treatment approaches. CONCLUSION: This project represents the first systematic evidence of patient- and clinician-centered research priorities for epilepsy. The results of this priority-setting exercise provide an opportunity for researchers and funding agencies to align their agendas with the values and needs of the epilepsy community in order to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life (QOL) for PWE.


Subject(s)
Epilepsy , Quality of Life , Canada , Caregivers , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Seizure ; 102: 51-53, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042128

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study assesses investigations, referrals and admissions in patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with seizures, and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on such management. Outcomes in patients with learning disabilities, active significant mental health concerns, and from the most socioeconomically deprived areas were compared to those of the general cohort. METHODS: Investigations, referrals and admissions were recorded for 120 patients across two cohorts; pre-pandemic (September 2019) and during the pandemic (December 2020). Retrospective review of individual patient electronic health care records was used for data collection. RESULTS: There was a decrease in patient numbers from 2019 to 2020. A greater proportion of patients presented with organic cause seizures and fewer presented with non-epileptic attacks. Frequent use of CT heads (45%) is likely to represent improper use of limited resources. There were low referral rates, both to acute neurology (28%) and to the adult epilepsy team (32%). Patients with active significant mental health concerns were significantly less likely to be referred to neurology or admitted. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a greater proportion of admissions during the Covid-19 pandemic, referrals to acute neurology and the epilepsy team remained low. Failure to refer prevents the most vulnerable seizure patients from receiving appropriate support, as seen in patients with active significant mental health concerns. Neurology staff were unaware of a significant number of patients presenting with seizures, which is of concern in an already over-stretched department. This offers an opportunity to improve care for people with epilepsy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Hospitals , Emergency Service, Hospital , Retrospective Studies
12.
Epilepsia Open ; 7(2): 325-331, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782589

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) measures on the hospitalization of patients with epilepsy and status epilepticus (SE). METHODS: This interrupted time series design included data from the Thai Universal Coverage Scheme electronic database between January 2017 and September 2020. The monthly hospitalization rate of epilepsy and SE was calculated by the number of hospitalizations divided by the midyear population. Segmented regression fitted by ordinary least squares (OLS) was used to detect the immediate and overtime effects of COVID-19 measures on the hospitalization rate. RESULTS: During January 2017 and September 2020, the numbers of epilepsy and SE patients admitted to the hospital were 129 402 and 15 547 episodes, respectively. The monthly trend of the hospitalization rate in epilepsy decreased immediately after the COVID-19 measure (0.739 per 100 000 population [95% CI: 0.219 to 1.260]). In particular, the number of children declined to 1.178 per 100 000 population, and the number of elderly individuals dropped to 0.467 per 100 000 population, while there was a nonstatistically significant change in SE. SIGNIFICANCE: COVID-19 measures reduced the hospital rate in epilepsy, particularly in children and adults. However, there was no change in SE patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/epidemiology , Status Epilepticus/therapy , Thailand/epidemiology
13.
Neurology ; 98(21): e2174-e2184, 2022 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We conducted a multisite, pragmatic replication trial at 4 New England epilepsy centers to determine the effectiveness of Home-Based Self-Management and Cognitive Training Changes Lives (HOBSCOTCH) in a real-world setting and to assess feasibility of a virtual intervention. METHODS: HOBSCOTCH is an 8-session intervention addressing cognitive impairment and quality of life (QoL) for people with epilepsy (PWE). Participants were recruited from epilepsy centers in 4 states and block-randomized into the following groups: in-person HOBSCOTCH (H-IP), virtual HOBSCOTCH (H-V), and waitlist control. Outcome measures were assessed for all groups at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months; intervention groups received long-term follow-up at 9 and 12 months. RESULTS: A total of 108 participants were recruited, of whom 85 were included in this analysis (age at baseline 47.5 ± 11.5 years; 68% female). Participants completing the in-person intervention (H-IP) had a 12.4-point improvement in QoL score compared with controls (p < 0.001). Pairwise comparisons found a 6.2-point treatment effect for subjective cognition in the H-IP group (p < 0.001). There were no meaningful group differences in objective cognition or health care utilization at any time points and the treatment effect for QoL diminished by 6 months. The virtual intervention demonstrated feasibility but did not significantly improve outcomes compared with controls. Within-group analysis found improvements in QoL for both H-V and H-IP. DISCUSSION: This study replicated the effectiveness of the HOBSCOTCH program in improving QoL for PWE. The study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, but the distance-delivered intervention may be particularly well-suited for the current environment. Future research will explore modifications designed to improve the efficacy of H-V and the sustainability of HOBSCOTCH's treatment effect. TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02394509). CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that in-person HOBSCOTCH delivery improved subjective measures of cognition in persons with epilepsy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Self-Management , Cognition , Epilepsy/psychology , Epilepsy/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
14.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(3): 213-223, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775070

ABSTRACT

Access to paediatric neurology care is complex, resulting in significant wait times and negative patient outcomes. The goal of the American Academy of Pediatrics National Coordinating Center for Epilepsy's project, Access Improvement and Management of Epilepsy with Telehealth (AIM-ET), was to identify access and management challenges in the deployment of telehealth technology. AIM-ET organised four paediatric neurology teams to partner with primary-care providers (PCP) and their multidisciplinary teams. Telehealth visits were conducted for paediatric epilepsy patients. A post-visit survey assessed access and satisfaction with the telehealth visit compared to an in-person visit. Pre/post surveys completed by PCPs and neurologists captured telehealth visit feasibility, functionality and provider satisfaction. A provider focus group assessed facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Sixty-one unique patients completed 75 telehealth visits. Paired t-test analysis demonstrated that telehealth enhanced access to epilepsy care. It reduced self-reported out-of-pocket costs (p<0.001), missed school hours (p<0.001) and missed work hours (p<0.001), with 94% equal parent/caregiver satisfaction. Focus groups indicated developing and maintaining partnerships, institutional infrastructure and education as facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Telehealth shortened travelling distance, reduced expenses and time missed from school and work. Further, it provides significant opportunity in an era when coronavirus disease 2019 limits in-person clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Neurology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Telemedicine/methods
15.
Neurology ; 98(19): 779-780, 2022 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765508
16.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 35(2): 169-174, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722760

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Epilepsy is a common, chronic neurologic disease with continued disparities in care. The COVID-19 pandemic and recent social movements have drawn greater attention to social determinants of health and our progress (or lack thereof) toward delivering more equitable care. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies continue to document racial and economic disparities in diagnosis, treatment, and overall care of epilepsy and associated conditions. Notably, an increasing number of studies are attempting to design healthcare pathways and other interventions to improve access and equity in epilepsy care. SUMMARY: The present literature highlights the importance of identifying and addressing the particular needs of vulnerable persons with epilepsy. Practitioners and researchers should continue to develop interventions aimed at improving care for all patients and, crucially, measure the impact of their changes to ensure that any interventions are truly advancing health equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
17.
Expert Rev Neurother ; 22(2): 145-153, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662065

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represented a relevant issue for people with epilepsy (PwE). Medical care and social restrictions exposed PwE to a high risk of seizure worsening. Medical institutions answered to the pandemic assuring only emergency care and implementing a remote assistance that highlighted the technological obsolescence of the medical care paradigms for PwE. AREA COVERED: We reviewed the literature on the COVID-19-related factors influencing the epilepsy course, from the evidence of seizure risk in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected PwE to anti-Sars-Cov-2 drugs interactions with antiseizure medications and the perceived changes of seizures in PwE. EXPERT OPINION: COVID-19 pandemic was a problematic experience for PwE. We must make treasure of the lessons learned during this period of social restrictions and employ the recent technological advances to improve PwE assistance, in particular telemedicine and electronic media for patients' education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Communicable Disease Control , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Epilepsy Behav ; 128: 108569, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Effectiveness of different tele-medicine strategies varies in different medical conditions. Use of basic tele-medicine strategy like mobile health (m-health) can be an effective option in different medical conditions in a resource-poor setting. AIMS: To study effectiveness and satisfaction of tele-medicine among persons with epilepsy (PWE) in a developing nation during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Persons with epilepsy aged 18 years or more who have attended epilepsy clinic at least once physically and were asked for regular follow-up were included. A cross-sectional telephonic survey was conducted to assess effectiveness of tele-medicine over past 1 year. Satisfaction was assessed by tele-medicine satisfaction questionnaire. RESULT: 31.9% of PWE have used tele-medicine facility in last 1 year and 58.2% were unaware of the availability of such a facility. Among those who utilized tele-medicine, 95.3% were able to explain their concerns satisfactorily during tele-consultation and change in prescription was done in 42.8%. None experienced any new adverse event. Overall, more than 95% were satisfied with tele-consultation and more than 80% wanted to use it again. CONCLUSION: Even basic tele-medicine strategies can be a very effective and satisfactory mode of follow-up for PWE in resource-poor settings. Steps should be undertaken to make people aware of the availability of such a facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 22(1): 11-17, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653759

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Seizures, including status epilepticus, have been reported in association with acute COVID-19 infection. People with epilepsy (PWE) have suffered from seizure exacerbations during the pandemic. This article reviews the data for clinical and electrographic seizures associated with COVID-19, technical EEG considerations for reducing risk of transmission, and factors contributing to seizure exacerbations in PWE as well as strategies to address this issue. RECENT FINDINGS: An increasing number of studies of larger cohorts, accounting for a variety of variables and often utilizing EEG with standardized terminology, are assessing the prevalence of seizures in hospitalized patients with acute COVID-19 infections, and gaining insight into the prevalence of seizures and their effect on outcomes. Additionally, recent studies are evaluating the effect of the pandemic on PWE, barriers faced, and the usefulness of telehealth. Although there is still much to learn regarding COVID-19, current studies help in assessing the risk of seizures, guiding EEG utilization, and optimizing the use of telehealth during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Status Epilepticus , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Seizures/complications , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy , Status Epilepticus/epidemiology , Status Epilepticus/etiology , Status Epilepticus/therapy
20.
Lancet Neurol ; 21(1): 8-10, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594285
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