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1.
Sci Adv ; 8(8): eabi6110, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714330

ABSTRACT

The spread of SARS-CoV-2 and ongoing COVID-19 pandemic underscores the need for new treatments. Here we report that cannabidiol (CBD) inhibits infection of SARS-CoV-2 in cells and mice. CBD and its metabolite 7-OH-CBD, but not THC or other congeneric cannabinoids tested, potently block SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung epithelial cells. CBD acts after viral entry, inhibiting viral gene expression and reversing many effects of SARS-CoV-2 on host gene transcription. CBD inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication in part by up-regulating the host IRE1α RNase endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and interferon signaling pathways. In matched groups of human patients from the National COVID Cohort Collaborative, CBD (100 mg/ml oral solution per medical records) had a significant negative association with positive SARS-CoV-2 tests. This study highlights CBD as a potential preventative agent for early-stage SARS-CoV-2 infection and merits future clinical trials. We caution against use of non-medical formulations including edibles, inhalants or topicals as a preventative or treatment therapy at the present time.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cannabidiol/pharmacology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cannabidiol/chemistry , Cannabidiol/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects , Endoribonucleases/genetics , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Interferons/metabolism , Mice , /metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
2.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715763

ABSTRACT

Epithelial cells are apico-basolateral polarized cells that line all tubular organs and are often targets for infectious agents. This review focuses on the release of human RNA virus particles from both sides of polarized human cells grown on transwells. Most viruses that infect the mucosa leave their host cells mainly via the apical side while basolateral release is linked to virus propagation within the host. Viruses do this by hijacking the cellular factors involved in polarization and trafficking. Thus, understanding epithelial polarization is essential for a clear understanding of virus pathophysiology.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/virology , RNA Viruses/physiology , Virus Release , Cell Polarity , Humans , Virion/physiology , Virus Assembly , Virus Replication
3.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(9): 2242-2254, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702796

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes significan t morbidity, mainly from pulmonary involvement, extrapulmonary symptoms are also major componen ts of the disease. Kidney disease, usually presenting as AKI, is particularly severe among patients with COVID-19. It is unknown, however, whether such injury results from direct kidney infection with COVID-19's causative virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or from indirect mechanisms. METHODS: Using ex vivo cell models, we sought to analyze SARS-CoV-2 interactions with kidney tubular cells and assess direct tubular injury. These models comprised primary human kidney epithelial cells (derived from nephrectomies) and grown as either proliferating monolayers or quiescent three-dimensional kidney spheroids. RESULTS: We demonstrated that viral entry molecules and high baseline levels of type 1 IFN-related molecules were present in monolayers and kidney spheroids. Although both models support viral infection and replication, they did not exhibit a cytopathic effect and cell death, outcomes that were strongly present in SARS-CoV-2-infected controls (African green monkey kidney clone E6 [Vero E6] cultures). A comparison of monolayer and spheroid cultures demonstrated higher infectivity and replication of SARS-CoV-2 in actively proliferating monolayers, although the spheroid cultures exhibited high er levels of ACE2. Monolayers exhibited elevation of some tubular injury molecules-including molecules related to fibrosis (COL1A1 and STAT6) and dedifferentiation (SNAI2)-and a loss of cell identity, evident by reduction in megalin (LRP2). The three-dimensional spheroids were less prone to such injury. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 can infect kidney cells without a cytopathic effect. AKI-induced cellular proliferation may potentially intensify infectivity and tubular damage by SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that early intervention in AKI is warranted to help minimize kidney infection.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spheroids, Cellular/virology , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cohort Studies , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Kidney/immunology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred NOD , Mice, SCID , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spheroids, Cellular/pathology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
4.
J Biol Chem ; 298(2): 101584, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699145

ABSTRACT

With the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), coronaviruses have begun to attract great attention across the world. Of the known human coronaviruses, however, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the most lethal. Coronavirus proteins can be divided into three groups: nonstructural proteins, structural proteins, and accessory proteins. While the number of each of these proteins varies greatly among different coronaviruses, accessory proteins are most closely related to the pathogenicity of the virus. We found for the first time that the ORF3 accessory protein of MERS-CoV, which closely resembles the ORF3a proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2, has the ability to induce apoptosis in cells in a dose-dependent manner. Through bioinformatics analysis and validation, we revealed that ORF3 is an unstable protein and has a shorter half-life in cells compared to that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2 ORF3a proteins. After screening, we identified a host E3 ligase, HUWE1, that specifically induces MERS-CoV ORF3 protein ubiquitination and degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This results in the diminished ability of ORF3 to induce apoptosis, which might partially explain the lower spread of MERS-CoV compared to other coronaviruses. In summary, this study reveals a pathological function of MERS-CoV ORF3 protein and identifies a potential host antiviral protein, HUWE1, with an ability to antagonize MERS-CoV pathogenesis by inducing ORF3 degradation, thus enriching our knowledge of the pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and suggesting new targets and strategies for clinical development of drugs for MERS-CoV treatment.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Ubiquitination , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Cell Line , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/physiology , Epithelial Cells/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans
5.
Cells ; 11(4)2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1688673

ABSTRACT

Transmembrane proteins of adherens and tight junctions are known targets for viruses and bacterial toxins. The coronavirus receptor ACE2 has been localized at the apical surface of epithelial cells, but it is not clear whether ACE2 is localized at apical Cell-Cell junctions and whether it associates with junctional proteins. Here we explored the expression and localization of ACE2 and its association with transmembrane and tight junction proteins in epithelial tissues and cultured cells by data mining, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. ACE2 mRNA is abundant in epithelial tissues, where its expression correlates with the expression of the tight junction proteins cingulin and occludin. In cultured epithelial cells ACE2 mRNA is upregulated upon differentiation and ACE2 protein is widely expressed and co-immunoprecipitates with the transmembrane proteins ADAM17 and CD9. We show by immunofluorescence microscopy that ACE2 colocalizes with ADAM17 and CD9 and the tight junction protein cingulin at apical junctions of intestinal (Caco-2), mammary (Eph4) and kidney (mCCD) epithelial cells. These observations identify ACE2, ADAM17 and CD9 as new epithelial junctional transmembrane proteins and suggest that the cytokine-enhanced endocytic internalization of junction-associated protein complexes comprising ACE2 may promote coronavirus entry.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Intercellular Junctions/metabolism , Intercellular Junctions/virology , ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , Adherens Junctions/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Cadherins/metabolism , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Cell Line , Cell Membrane Permeability , Coronavirus/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression/genetics , Tetraspanin 29/metabolism , Tight Junction Proteins/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687057

ABSTRACT

The types of interactions between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other respiratory viruses are not well-characterized due to the low number of co-infection cases described since the onset of the pandemic. We have evaluated the interactions between SARS-CoV-2 (D614G mutant) and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in the nasal human airway epithelium (HAE) infected simultaneously or sequentially (24 h apart) with virus combinations. The replication kinetics of each virus were determined by RT-qPCR at different post-infection times. Our results showed that during simultaneous infection, SARS-CoV-2 interferes with RSV-A2 but not with A(H1N1)pdm09 replication. The prior infection of nasal HAE with SARS-CoV-2 reduces the replication kinetics of both respiratory viruses. SARS-CoV-2 replication is decreased by a prior infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 but not with RSV-A2. The pretreatment of nasal HAE with BX795, a TANK-binding kinase 1 inhibitor, partially alleviates the reduced replication of SARS-CoV-2 or influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during sequential infection with both virus combinations. Thus, a prior infection of nasal HAE with SARS-CoV-2 interferes with the replication kinetics of A(H1N1)pdm09 and RSV-A2, whereas only A(H1N1)pdm09 reduces the subsequent infection with SARS-CoV-2. The mechanism involved in the viral interference between SARS-CoV-2 and A(H1N1)pdm09 is mediated by the production of interferon.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/virology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Nasopharynx/cytology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Interference , Virus Replication , Coinfection , Humans , Microbial Interactions , Nasopharynx/virology
7.
Life Sci Alliance ; 5(5)2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675573

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury is associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients. However, host cell changes underlying infection of renal cells with SARS-CoV-2 remain unknown and prevent understanding of the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to renal pathology. Here, we carried out quantitative translatome and whole-cell proteomics analyses of primary renal proximal and distal tubular epithelial cells derived from human donors infected with SARS-CoV-2 or MERS-CoV to disseminate virus and cell type-specific changes over time. Our findings revealed shared pathways modified upon infection with both viruses, as well as SARS-CoV-2-specific host cell modulation driving key changes in innate immune activation and cellular protein quality control. Notably, MERS-CoV infection-induced specific changes in mitochondrial biology that were not observed in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Furthermore, we identified extensive modulation in pathways associated with kidney failure that changed in a virus- and cell type-specific manner. In summary, we provide an overview of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 or MERS-CoV infection on primary renal epithelial cells revealing key pathways that may be essential for viral replication.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Kidney , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Proteome , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Nucleus/genetics , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Distal , Kidney Tubules, Proximal , Mitochondria/genetics , Mitochondria/metabolism , Primary Cell Culture , Proteomics/methods , Virus Replication
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 800074, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662584

ABSTRACT

Collapsing glomerulopathy represents a special variant of the proteinuric kidney disease focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Histologically, the collapsing form of FSGS (cFSGS) is characterized by segmental or global condensation and obliteration of glomerular capillaries, the appearance of hyperplastic and hypertrophic podocytes and severe tubulointerstitial damage. Clinically, cFSGS patients present with acute kidney injury, nephrotic-range proteinuria and are at a high risk of rapid progression to irreversible kidney failure. cFSGS can be attributed to numerous etiologies, namely, viral infections like HIV, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr-Virus, and parvovirus B19 and also drugs and severe ischemia. Risk variants of the APOL1 gene, predominantly found in people of African descent, increase the risk of developing cFSGS. Patients infected with the new Corona-Virus SARS-CoV-2 display an increased rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) in severe cases of COVID-19. Besides hemodynamic instability, cytokine mediated injury and direct viral entry and infection of renal epithelial cells contributing to AKI, there are emerging reports of cFSGS associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients of mainly African ethnicity. The pathogenesis of cFSGS is proposed to be linked with direct viral infection of podocytes, as described for HIV-associated glomerulopathy. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence that the systemic inflammatory cascade, activated in acute viral infections like COVID-19, is a major contributor to the impairment of basic cellular functions in podocytes. This mini review will summarize the current knowledge on cFSGS associated with viral infections with a special focus on the influence of systemic immune responses and potential mechanisms propagating the development of cFSGS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/etiology , Kidney Glomerulus/virology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/immunology , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/virology , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Kidney Glomerulus/immunology , Podocytes/immunology , Podocytes/virology , Proteinuria/etiology , Proteinuria/immunology , Proteinuria/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
9.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(4): 4882-4891, 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649372

ABSTRACT

Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is seriously threatening human health. Following SARS-CoV-2 infection, immune cell infiltration creates an inflammatory and oxidative microenvironment, which can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. Clinically, a safe and effective treatment strategy remains to be established. Herein, a nano-bait strategy for inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 infection by redirecting viral attack while simultaneously relieving inflammation is developed. Specifically, the nano-bait was based on the exosome-sheathed polydopamine (PDA@Exosome) nanoparticles, which were generated by exocytosis of the PDA nanoparticles from H293T cells. In this approach, PDA@Exosome inherits from the source cells of H293T cells a surface display of ACE2 through pre-engineered expression. The resulting PDA@Exosome can compete with ACE2-expressing epithelial cells for S protein binding, in either the pre-exposure or post-exposure route. Moreover, relying on the ability of PDA to intercept and deactivate radical species, the PDA@Exosome can significantly attenuate the level of inflammatory cytokines by mediating oxidative stress, a major cause of organ injury. Due to its high trapping, multiple antioxidant ability, and good biocompatibility, the HACE2-exosome based nano-bait is a promising robust antiviral nanotherapeutics for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Exosomes/drug effects , Exosomes/genetics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Internalization/drug effects
10.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636836

ABSTRACT

Human adenoviruses (HAdV) cause a variety of infections in human hosts, from self-limited upper respiratory tract infections in otherwise healthy people to fulminant pneumonia and death in immunocompromised patients. Many HAdV enter polarized epithelial cells by using the primary receptor, the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Recently published data demonstrate that a potent neutrophil (PMN) chemoattractant, interleukin-8 (IL-8), stimulates airway epithelial cells to increase expression of the apical isoform of CAR (CAREx8), which results in increased epithelial HAdV type 5 (HAdV5) infection. However, the mechanism for PMN-enhanced epithelial HAdV5 transduction remains unclear. In this manuscript, the molecular mechanisms behind PMN mediated enhancement of epithelial HAdV5 transduction are characterized using an MDCK cell line that stably expresses human CAREx8 under a doxycycline inducible promoter (MDCK-CAREx8 cells). Contrary to our hypothesis, PMN exposure does not enhance HAdV5 entry by increasing CAREx8 expression nor through activation of non-specific epithelial endocytic pathways. Instead, PMN serine proteases are responsible for PMN-mediated enhancement of HAdV5 transduction in MDCK-CAREx8 cells. This is evidenced by reduced transduction upon inhibition of PMN serine proteases and increased transduction upon exposure to exogenous human neutrophil elastase (HNE). Furthermore, HNE exposure activates epithelial autophagic flux, which, even when triggered through other mechanisms, results in a similar enhancement of epithelial HAdV5 transduction. Inhibition of F-actin with cytochalasin D partially attenuates PMN mediated enhancement of HAdV transduction. Taken together, these findings suggest that HAdV5 can leverage innate immune responses to establish infections.


Subject(s)
Adenoviruses, Human/pathogenicity , Epithelial Cells/virology , Leukocyte Elastase/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Virus Internalization , Adenoviruses, Human/immunology , Adenoviruses, Human/physiology , Animals , Autophagy , Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein/metabolism , Cytochalasin B/pharmacology , Dogs , Endocytosis , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Macrolides/pharmacology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Receptors, Virus/metabolism
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625839

ABSTRACT

The global urgency to uncover medical countermeasures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has revealed an unmet need for robust tissue culture models that faithfully recapitulate key features of human tissues and disease. Infection of the nose is considered the dominant initial site for SARS-CoV-2 infection and models that replicate this entry portal offer the greatest potential for examining and demonstrating the effectiveness of countermeasures designed to prevent or manage this highly communicable disease. Here, we test an air-liquid-interface (ALI) differentiated human nasal epithelium (HNE) culture system as a model of authentic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Progenitor cells (basal cells) were isolated from nasal turbinate brushings, expanded under conditionally reprogrammed cell (CRC) culture conditions and differentiated at ALI. Differentiated cells were inoculated with different SARS-CoV-2 clinical isolates. Infectious virus release into apical washes was determined by TCID50, while infected cells were visualized by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. We demonstrate robust, reproducible SARS-CoV-2 infection of ALI-HNE established from different donors. Viral entry and release occurred from the apical surface, and infection was primarily observed in ciliated cells. In contrast to the ancestral clinical isolate, the Delta variant caused considerable cell damage. Successful establishment of ALI-HNE is donor dependent. ALI-HNE recapitulate key features of human SARS-CoV-2 infection of the nose and can serve as a pre-clinical model without the need for invasive collection of human respiratory tissue samples.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Nasal Mucosa/cytology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , Tissue Culture Techniques/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cell Culture Techniques , Cell Differentiation , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization
12.
Nat Cell Biol ; 24(1): 24-34, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625709

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection of human cells is initiated by the binding of the viral Spike protein to its cell-surface receptor ACE2. We conducted a targeted CRISPRi screen to uncover druggable pathways controlling Spike protein binding to human cells. Here we show that the protein BRD2 is required for ACE2 transcription in human lung epithelial cells and cardiomyocytes, and BRD2 inhibitors currently evaluated in clinical trials potently block endogenous ACE2 expression and SARS-CoV-2 infection of human cells, including those of human nasal epithelia. Moreover, pharmacological BRD2 inhibition with the drug ABBV-744 inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in Syrian hamsters. We also found that BRD2 controls transcription of several other genes induced upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, including the interferon response, which in turn regulates the antiviral response. Together, our results pinpoint BRD2 as a potent and essential regulator of the host response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and highlight the potential of BRD2 as a therapeutic target for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Epithelial Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Transcription Factors/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcription Factors/metabolism
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595265

ABSTRACT

Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) provokes a potentially fatal pneumonia with multiorgan failure, and high systemic inflammation. To gain mechanistic insight and ferret out the root of this immune dysregulation, we modeled, by in vitro coculture, the interactions between infected epithelial cells and immunocytes. A strong response was induced in monocytes and B cells, with a SARS-CoV-2-specific inflammatory gene cluster distinct from that seen in influenza A or Ebola virus-infected cocultures, and which reproduced deviations reported in blood or lung myeloid cells from COVID-19 patients. A substantial fraction of the effect could be reproduced after individual transfection of several SARS-CoV-2 proteins (Spike and some nonstructural proteins), mediated by soluble factors, but not via transcriptional induction. This response was greatly muted in monocytes from healthy children, perhaps a clue to the age dependency of COVID-19. These results suggest that the inflammatory malfunction in COVID-19 is rooted in the earliest perturbations that SARS-CoV-2 induces in epithelia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Coculture Techniques , Ebolavirus/pathogenicity , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Lung/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/immunology
14.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001065, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594053

ABSTRACT

The pandemic spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), represents an ongoing international health crisis. A key symptom of SARS-CoV-2 infection is the onset of fever, with a hyperthermic temperature range of 38 to 41°C. Fever is an evolutionarily conserved host response to microbial infection that can influence the outcome of viral pathogenicity and regulation of host innate and adaptive immune responses. However, it remains to be determined what effect elevated temperature has on SARS-CoV-2 replication. Utilizing a three-dimensional (3D) air-liquid interface (ALI) model that closely mimics the natural tissue physiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the respiratory airway, we identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the regulation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Respiratory tissue incubated at 40°C remained permissive to SARS-CoV-2 entry but refractory to viral transcription, leading to significantly reduced levels of viral RNA replication and apical shedding of infectious virus. We identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the differential regulation of epithelial host responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection that impact upon multiple pathways, including intracellular immune regulation, without disruption to general transcription or epithelium integrity. We present the first evidence that febrile temperatures associated with COVID-19 inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in respiratory epithelia. Our data identify an important role for tissue temperature in the epithelial restriction of SARS-CoV-2 independently of canonical interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral immune defenses.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/immunology , Hot Temperature , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology , Adolescent , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , RNA-Seq/methods , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology
16.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580896

ABSTRACT

ADAR1-mediated deamination of adenosines in long double-stranded RNAs plays an important role in modulating the innate immune response. However, recent investigations based on metatranscriptomic samples of COVID-19 patients and SARS-COV-2-infected Vero cells have recovered contrasting findings. Using RNAseq data from time course experiments of infected human cell lines and transcriptome data from Vero cells and clinical samples, we prove that A-to-G changes observed in SARS-COV-2 genomes represent genuine RNA editing events, likely mediated by ADAR1. While the A-to-I editing rate is generally low, changes are distributed along the entire viral genome, are overrepresented in exonic regions, and are (in the majority of cases) nonsynonymous. The impact of RNA editing on virus-host interactions could be relevant to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genome, Viral , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , RNA Editing , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Deamination , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inosine/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/immunology , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/immunology , RNA, Viral/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome , Vero Cells
17.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580417

ABSTRACT

Different serological assays were rapidly generated to study humoral responses against the SARS-CoV-2 Spike glycoprotein. Due to the intrinsic difficulty of working with SARS-CoV-2 authentic virus, most serological assays use recombinant forms of the Spike glycoprotein or its receptor binding domain (RBD). Cell-based assays expressing different forms of the Spike, as well as pseudoviral assays, are also widely used. To evaluate whether these assays recapitulate findings generated when the Spike is expressed in its physiological context (at the surface of the infected primary cells), we developed an intracellular staining against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) to distinguish infected from uninfected cells. Human airway epithelial cells (pAECs) were infected with authentic SARS-CoV-2 D614G or Alpha variants. We observed robust cell-surface expression of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike at the surface of the infected pAECs using the conformational-independent anti-S2 CV3-25 antibody. The infected cells were also readily recognized by plasma from convalescent and vaccinated individuals and correlated with several serological assays. This suggests that the antigenicity of the Spike present at the surface of the infected primary cells is maintained in serological assays involving expression of the native full-length Spike.


Subject(s)
Cell Membrane/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity , Bronchioles/cytology , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580411

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) quickly spread worldwide following its emergence in Wuhan, China, and hit pandemic levels. Its tremendous incidence favoured the emergence of viral variants. The current genome diversity of SARS-CoV-2 has a clear impact on epidemiology and clinical practice, especially regarding transmission rates and the effectiveness of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the replication of different SARS-CoV-2 isolates representing different virus genotypes which have been isolated throughout the pandemic. We used three distinct cell lines, including Vero E6 cells originating from monkeys; Caco-2 cells, an intestinal epithelium cell line originating from humans; and Calu-3 cells, a pulmonary epithelium cell line also originating from humans. We used RT-qPCR to replicate different SARS-CoV-2 genotypes by quantifying the virus released in the culture supernatant of infected cells. We found that the different viral isolates replicate similarly in Caco-2 cells, but show very different replicative capacities in Calu-3 cells. This was especially highlighted for the lineages B.1.1.7, B.1.351 and P.1, which are considered to be variants of concern. These results underscore the importance of the evaluation and characterisation of each SARS-CoV-2 isolate in order to establish the replication patterns before performing tests, and of the consideration of the ideal SARS-CoV-2 genotype-cell type pair for each assay.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Genotype , Humans , Intestines/cytology , Lung/cytology , Mutation , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Tropism/physiology
19.
Nature ; 602(7896): 307-313, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585832

ABSTRACT

Emerging variants of concern (VOCs) are driving the COVID-19 pandemic1,2. Experimental assessments of replication and transmission of major VOCs and progenitors are needed to understand the mechanisms of replication and transmission of VOCs3. Here we show that the spike protein (S) from Alpha (also known as B.1.1.7) and Beta (B.1.351) VOCs had a greater affinity towards the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor than that of the progenitor variant S(D614G) in vitro. Progenitor variant virus expressing S(D614G) (wt-S614G) and the Alpha variant showed similar replication kinetics in human nasal airway epithelial cultures, whereas the Beta variant was outcompeted by both. In vivo, competition experiments showed a clear fitness advantage of Alpha over wt-S614G in ferrets and two mouse models-the substitutions in S were major drivers of the fitness advantage. In hamsters, which support high viral replication levels, Alpha and wt-S614G showed similar fitness. By contrast, Beta was outcompeted by Alpha and wt-S614G in hamsters and in mice expressing human ACE2. Our study highlights the importance of using multiple models to characterize fitness of VOCs and demonstrates that Alpha is adapted for replication in the upper respiratory tract and shows enhanced transmission in vivo in restrictive models, whereas Beta does not overcome Alpha or wt-S614G in naive animals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Animals, Laboratory/virology , COVID-19/veterinary , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Ferrets/virology , Humans , Male , Mesocricetus/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virulence/genetics
20.
Nature ; 602(7896): 321-327, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585831

ABSTRACT

It is not fully understood why COVID-19 is typically milder in children1-3. Here, to examine the differences between children and adults in their response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we analysed paediatric and adult patients with COVID-19 as well as healthy control individuals (total n = 93) using single-cell multi-omic profiling of matched nasal, tracheal, bronchial and blood samples. In the airways of healthy paediatric individuals, we observed cells that were already in an interferon-activated state, which after SARS-CoV-2 infection was further induced especially in airway immune cells. We postulate that higher paediatric innate interferon responses restrict viral replication and disease progression. The systemic response in children was characterized by increases in naive lymphocytes and a depletion of natural killer cells, whereas, in adults, cytotoxic T cells and interferon-stimulated subpopulations were significantly increased. We provide evidence that dendritic cells initiate interferon signalling in early infection, and identify epithelial cell states associated with COVID-19 and age. Our matching nasal and blood data show a strong interferon response in the airways with the induction of systemic interferon-stimulated populations, which were substantially reduced in paediatric patients. Together, we provide several mechanisms that explain the milder clinical syndrome observed in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Adult , Bronchi/immunology , Bronchi/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Chicago , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , London , Male , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Single-Cell Analysis , Trachea/virology , Young Adult
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