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2.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 10(7): 537-556, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231879

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused immediate and far-reaching disruption to society, the economy, and health-care services. We synthesised evidence on the effect of the pandemic on mental health and mental health care in high-income European countries. We included 177 longitudinal and repeated cross-sectional studies comparing prevalence or incidence of mental health problems, mental health symptom severity in people with pre-existing mental health conditions, or mental health service use before versus during the pandemic, or between different timepoints of the pandemic. We found that epidemiological studies reported higher prevalence of some mental health problems during the pandemic compared with before it, but that in most cases this increase reduced over time. Conversely, studies of health records showed reduced incidence of new diagnoses at the start of the pandemic, which further declined during 2020. Mental health service use also declined at the onset of the pandemic but increased later in 2020 and through 2021, although rates of use did not return to pre-pandemic levels for some services. We found mixed patterns of effects of the pandemic on mental health and social outcome for adults already living with mental health conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe/epidemiology
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1124915, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326992

ABSTRACT

Background: Lower psychological wellbeing is associated with poor outcomes in a variety of diseases and healthy populations. However, no study has investigated whether psychological wellbeing is associated with the outcomes of COVID-19. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with lower psychological wellbeing are more at risk for poor outcomes of COVID-19. Methods: Data were from the Survey of Health, Aging, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) in 2017 and SHARE's two COVID-19 surveys in June-September 2020 and June-August 2021. Psychological wellbeing was measured using the CASP-12 scale in 2017. The associations of the CASP-12 score with COVID-19 hospitalization and mortality were assessed using logistic models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, household income, education level, and chronic conditions. Sensitivity analyses were performed by imputing missing data or excluding cases whose diagnosis of COVID-19 was solely based on symptoms. A confirmatory analysis was conducted using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA). Data analysis took place in October 2022. Results: In total, 3,886 individuals of 50 years of age or older with COVID-19 were included from 25 European countries and Israel, with 580 hospitalized (14.9%) and 100 deaths (2.6%). Compared with individuals in tertile 3 (highest) of the CASP-12 score, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of COVID-19 hospitalization were 1.81 (95% CI, 1.41-2.31) for those in tertile 1 (lowest) and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07-1.75) for those in tertile 2. As for COVID-19 mortality, the adjusted ORs were 2.05 (95% CI, 1.12-3.77) for tertile 1 and 1.78 (95% CI, 0.98-3.23) for tertile 2, compared with tertile 3. The results were relatively robust to missing data or the exclusion of cases solely based on symptoms. This inverse association of the CASP-12 score with COVID-19 hospitalization risk was also observed in ELSA. Conclusion: This study shows that lower psychological wellbeing is independently associated with increased risks of COVID-19 hospitalization and mortality in European adults aged 50 years or older. Further study is needed to validate these associations in recent and future waves of the COVID-19 pandemic and other populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Israel/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Hospitalization , Europe/epidemiology
4.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 53: 102583, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a sharp decline of post-travel patient encounters at the European sentinel surveillance network (EuroTravNet) of travellers' health. We report on the impact of COVID-19 on travel-related infectious diseases as recorded by EuroTravNet clinics. METHODS: Travelers who presented between January 1, 2019 and September 30, 2021 were included. Comparisons were made between the pre-pandemic period (14 months from January 1, 2019 to February 29, 2020); and the pandemic period (19 months from March 1, 2020 to September 30, 2021). RESULTS: Of the 15,124 visits to the network during the 33-month observation period, 10,941 (72%) were during the pre-pandemic period, and 4183 (28%) during the pandemic period. Average monthly visits declined from 782/month (pre-COVID-19 era) to 220/month (COVID-19 pandemic era). Among non-migrants, the top-10 countries of exposure changed after onset of the COVID-19 pandemic; destinations such as Italy and Austria, where COVID-19 exposure peaked in the first months, replaced typical travel destinations in Asia (Thailand, Indonesia, India). There was a small decline in migrant patients reported, with little change in the top countries of exposure (Bolivia, Mali). The three top diagnoses with the largest overall decreases in relative frequency were acute gastroenteritis (-5.3%), rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (-2.8%), and dengue (-2.6%). Apart from COVID-19 (which rose from 0.1% to 12.7%), the three top diagnoses with the largest overall relative frequency increase were schistosomiasis (+4.9%), strongyloidiasis (+2.7%), and latent tuberculosis (+2.4%). CONCLUSIONS: A marked COVID-19 pandemic-induced decline in global travel activities is reflected in reduced travel-related infectious diseases sentinel surveillance reporting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Sentinel Surveillance , Travel , Pandemics , Travel-Related Illness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Europe/epidemiology , Thailand
6.
J Med Virol ; 95(5): e28771, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325829

ABSTRACT

The recent reports of oral side effects (SEs) following COVID-19 vaccination warrant further investigation into their prevalence, severity, and aetiology. This study was conducted to synthesize the first-ever population-level evidence about oral SEs of COVID-19 vaccines in Europe. The European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Pharmacovigilance (EudraVigilance) database was accessed in August 2022 to extract summary data of all potential oral SEs reported after COVID-19 vaccination. The data were reported descriptively and cross-tabulated to facilitate sub-group analysis per vaccine type, sex, and age group. Dysgeusia was the most commonly reported oral SE (0.381 case per each 100 received reports), followed by oral paraesthesia (0.315%), ageusia (0.296%), lip swelling (0.243%), dry mouth (0.215%), oral hypoaesthesia (0.210%), swollen tongue (0.207%), and taste disorder (0.173%). Females had significantly (Sig. < 0.001) a higher prevalence of all most common (top 20) oral SEs, except for salivary hypersecretion, which was equally prevalent among females and males. The present study revealed a low prevalence of oral SEs, with taste-related, other sensory and anaphylactic SEs being the most common SEs in Europe, similar to what was found earlier among the US population. Future studies should explore the potential risk factors of oral sensory and anaphylactic SEs to verify whether they are causally linked to COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Europe/epidemiology
7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 130 Suppl 1: S25-S29, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317563

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Although evidence is growing on the overall impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on tuberculosis (TB) services, global studies based on national data are needed to better quantify the extent of the impact and the countries' preparedness to tackle the two diseases. The aim of this study was to compare the number of people with new diagnoses or recurrence of TB disease, the number of drug-resistant (DR)-TB, and the number of TB deaths in 2020 vs 2019 in 11 countries in Europe, Northern America, and Australia. METHODS: TB managers or directors of national reference centers of the selected countries provided the agreed-upon variables through a validated questionnaire on a monthly basis. A descriptive analysis compared the incidence of TB and DR-TB and mortality of the pre-COVID-19 year (2019) vs the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic (2020). RESULTS: Comparing 2020 vs 2019, lower number of TB cases (new diagnosis or recurrence) was notified in all countries (except USA-Virginia and Australia), and fewer DR-TB notifications (apart from France, Portugal, and Spain). The deaths among TB cases were higher in 2020 compared to 2019 in most countries with three countries (France, The Netherlands, USA-Virginia) reporting minimal TB-related mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A comprehensive evaluation of medium-term impact of COVID-19 on TB services would benefit from similar studies in multiple settings and from global availability of treatment outcome data from TB/COVID-19 co-infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tuberculosis, Miliary , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant , Humans , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Europe/epidemiology , North America/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/epidemiology
8.
Health Econ ; 32(8): 1659-1669, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316481

ABSTRACT

We here investigate the role of risk aversion in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. The theoretical effect is ambiguous, as both COVID-19 infection and vaccination side-effects involve probabilistic elements. In large-scale data covering five European countries, we find that vaccine hesitancy falls with risk aversion, so that COVID-19 infection is perceived as involving greater risk than is vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Europe/epidemiology , Vaccination
9.
Eur Psychiatry ; 66(1): e39, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320485

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and yet delivery of care for this illness is rife with gaps. The COVID-19 pandemic has had far reaching implications for every facet of healthcare, and MDD is no exception. This scoping review aimed to ascertain the impacts of COVID-19 on the delivery of MDD care in Europe, as well as to evaluate any novel MDD care strategies trialled in this period. METHODS: We searched the PubMed and PsycINFO databases up to January 2022 with a strategy centred around COVID-19 and MDD. Full texts of eligible studies examining working-age adults and conducted in Europe were evaluated against several criteria. All outcomes were then extracted and a narrative synthesis was constructed to summarise identified themes. RESULTS: Of 1,744 records identified in our search, 11 articles were eligible for inclusion in the review. In general, these studies reported a decrease in treatment rates, access to care, and perceived access to care during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, digital interventions trialled during the pandemic were broadly well-received by users, though their efficacy in improving MDD care was ambiguous. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a limited number of pertinent studies, this scoping review identified a trend of exacerbated treatment gaps in MDD care during the pandemic. Several of our pre-specified gaps, including delays to detection or treatment of depression and rates of follow-up contacts, remained unexplored in the context of COVID-19. This highlights the need for further investigation to obtain a full understanding of the relationship between COVID-19 and MDD care in Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/therapy , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Europe/epidemiology
11.
Elife ; 122023 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313805

ABSTRACT

Although France was one of the most affected European countries by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, the dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) movement within France, but also involving France in Europe and in the world, remain only partially characterized in this timeframe. Here, we analyzed GISAID deposited sequences from January 1 to December 31, 2020 (n = 638,706 sequences at the time of writing). To tackle the challenging number of sequences without the bias of analyzing a single subsample of sequences, we produced 100 subsamples of sequences and related phylogenetic trees from the whole dataset for different geographic scales (worldwide, European countries, and French administrative regions) and time periods (from January 1 to July 25, 2020, and from July 26 to December 31, 2020). We applied a maximum likelihood discrete trait phylogeographic method to date exchange events (i.e., a transition from one location to another one), to estimate the geographic spread of SARS-CoV-2 transmissions and lineages into, from and within France, Europe, and the world. The results unraveled two different patterns of exchange events between the first and second half of 2020. Throughout the year, Europe was systematically associated with most of the intercontinental exchanges. SARS-CoV-2 was mainly introduced into France from North America and Europe (mostly by Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, Belgium, and Germany) during the first European epidemic wave. During the second wave, exchange events were limited to neighboring countries without strong intercontinental movement, but Russia widely exported the virus into Europe during the summer of 2020. France mostly exported B.1 and B.1.160 lineages, respectively, during the first and second European epidemic waves. At the level of French administrative regions, the Paris area was the main exporter during the first wave. But, for the second epidemic wave, it equally contributed to virus spread with Lyon area, the second most populated urban area after Paris in France. The main circulating lineages were similarly distributed among the French regions. To conclude, by enabling the inclusion of tens of thousands of viral sequences, this original phylodynamic method enabled us to robustly describe SARS-CoV-2 geographic spread through France, Europe, and worldwide in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Phylogeny , Pandemics , Europe/epidemiology , France/epidemiology
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 23(1): 268, 2023 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305784

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most countries have enacted some restrictions to reduce social contacts to slow down disease transmission during the COVID-19 pandemic. For nearly two years, individuals likely also adopted new behaviours to avoid pathogen exposure based on personal circumstances. We aimed to understand the way in which different factors affect social contacts - a critical step to improving future pandemic responses. METHODS: The analysis was based on repeated cross-sectional contact survey data collected in a standardized international study from 21 European countries between March 2020 and March 2022. We calculated the mean daily contacts reported using a clustered bootstrap by country and by settings (at home, at work, or in other settings). Where data were available, contact rates during the study period were compared with rates recorded prior to the pandemic. We fitted censored individual-level generalized additive mixed models to examine the effects of various factors on the number of social contacts. RESULTS: The survey recorded 463,336 observations from 96,456 participants. In all countries where comparison data were available, contact rates over the previous two years were substantially lower than those seen prior to the pandemic (approximately from over 10 to < 5), predominantly due to fewer contacts outside the home. Government restrictions imposed immediate effect on contacts, and these effects lingered after the restrictions were lifted. Across countries, the relationships between national policy, individual perceptions, or personal circumstances determining contacts varied. CONCLUSIONS: Our study, coordinated at the regional level, provides important insights into the understanding of the factors associated with social contacts to support future infectious disease outbreak responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe/epidemiology
13.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 6121, 2023 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304647

ABSTRACT

Using a unique harmonized real-time data set from the COME-HERE longitudinal survey that covers five European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Sweden) and applying a non-parametric machine learning model, this paper identifies the main individual and macro-level predictors of self-protecting behaviors against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the first wave of the pandemic. Exploiting the interpretability of a Random Forest algorithm via Shapely values, we find that a higher regional incidence of COVID-19 triggers higher levels of self-protective behavior, as does a stricter government policy response. The level of individual knowledge about the pandemic, confidence in institutions, and population density also ranks high among the factors that predict self-protecting behaviors. We also identify a steep socioeconomic gradient with lower levels of self-protecting behaviors being associated with lower income and poor housing conditions. Among socio-demographic factors, gender, marital status, age, and region of residence are the main determinants of self-protective measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Europe/epidemiology , Machine Learning
14.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0283465, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Varicella is usually a mild disease in children but may be life-threatening, especially in adolescents and adults. Infection control measures implemented during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have suppressed varicella transmission, potentially creating an 'immunity debt', particularly in countries without universal varicella vaccination. OBJECTIVES: To assess trends in Google search engine queries for varicella keywords as a proxy for varicella infection rates and to evaluate the effect of universal varicella vaccination on these trends. A further objective was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on varicella keyword search query trends in countries with and without universal varicella vaccination. METHODS: This study used the keyword research tool, Google Trends, to evaluate trends in time series of the relative search query popularity of language-specific varicella keywords in 28 European countries from January 2015 through December 2021. The Google Ads Keyword Planner tool was used to evaluate absolute search volumes from March 2018 through December 2021. RESULTS: The relative search query popularity of varicella keywords displayed marked seasonal variation. In all 28 countries, the relative search query popularity of varicella keywords declined after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020), compared with pre-pandemic levels (range, -18% to -70%). From April 2020 to July 2021, a period of intense COVID-19 transmission and infection control, absolute search volumes for varicella keywords were lower than pre-pandemic levels but rebounded after July 2021, when infection control measures were relaxed. CONCLUSION: This evaluation of search query trends demonstrated that search query data could be used as a proxy for trends in varicella infection rates and revealed that transmission of varicella may have been suppressed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Consideration should be given to using search query data to better understand the burden of varicella, particularly in countries where surveillance systems are inadequate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chickenpox , Child , Adult , Adolescent , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Chickenpox/epidemiology , Chickenpox/prevention & control , Europe/epidemiology , Vaccination , Immunization , Search Engine
15.
BMC Neurol ; 23(1): 147, 2023 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302357

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-world evidence on experience and satisfaction of ofatumumab as a treatment option for relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) is limited. OBJECTIVE: To present cumulative responses from a questionnaire related to first-hand experience of treating physicians on handling and convenience of ofatumumab therapy along with concerns related to COVID-19. METHODS: PERITIA was a multicentre survey conducted to collect responses from the ASCLEPIOS I/II trial investigators from Europe via an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Forty-six physicians (Germany, n = 14; Spain, n = 12; Portugal, n = 10; Italy, n = 10) completed the survey. Overall, 43% of the physicians considered the benefit-risk ratio of ofatumumab as very good. Over 93% were in favour of ofatumumab self-administration at home and the majority (83%) believed it to be completely true that self-administration of ofatumumab eases the burden for patients in terms of time. All investigators would like to potentially use anti-CD20 therapy as a long-term strategy. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians were in favour of a self-administration of MS therapy at home over other anti-CD20 therapy infusions. CONCLUSION: European neurologists who were part of this survey considered the benefit-risk-ratio of ofatumumab as favourable and the monthly self-administered subcutaneous injections offering convenience for patients in the clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , COVID-19 , Humans , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Europe/epidemiology , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0285078, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contextual factors are essential for understanding long-term adjustment to the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, the present study investigated changes in mental health outcomes and subjective pandemic-related experiences over time and across countries. The main objective was to explore how psychological responses vary in relation to individual and environmental factors. METHODS: The sample consisted of N = 1070 participants from the general population of Austria, Croatia, Georgia, Greece, and Portugal. We applied a longitudinal mixed-methods approach, with baseline assessment in summer and autumn 2020 (T1) and follow-up assessment 12 months later (T2). Qualitative content analysis by Mayring was used to analyse open-ended questions about stressful events, positive and negative aspects of the pandemic, and recommendations on how to cope. Mental health outcomes were assessed with the Adjustment Disorder-New Module 8 (ADNM-8), the Primary Care PTSD Screen for DSM-5 (PC-PTSD-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2), and the 5-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5). The analyses were performed with SPSS Statistics Version 26 and MAXQDA 2022. RESULTS: The mental health outcomes significantly differed over time and across countries, with e.g. Greek participants showing decrease in adjustment disorder symptoms (p = .007) between T1 and T2. Compared with other countries, we found better mental health outcomes in the Austrian and the Croatian sample at both timepoints (p < .05). Regarding qualitative data, some themes were equally represented at both timepoints (e.g. Restrictions and changes in daily life), while others were more prominent at T1 (e.g. Work and finances) or T2 (e.g. Vaccination issues). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that people's reactions to the pandemic are largely shaped by the shifting context of the pandemic, country-specific factors, and individual characteristics and circumstances. Resource-oriented interventions focusing on psychological flexibility might promote resilience and mental health amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and other global crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Europe/epidemiology , Austria/epidemiology
18.
Drug Saf ; 46(4): 391-404, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277399

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 vaccines were rapidly authorised, thus requiring intense post-marketing re-evaluation of their benefit-risk profile. A multi-national European collaboration was established with the aim to prospectively monitor safety of the COVID-19 vaccines through web-based survey of vaccinees. METHODS: A prospective cohort event monitoring study was conducted with primary consented data collection in seven European countries. Through the web applications, participants received and completed baseline and up to six follow-up questionnaires on self-reported adverse reactions for at least 6 months following the first dose of COVID-19 vaccine (Netherlands, France, Belgium, UK, Italy) and baseline and up to ten follow-up questionnaires for one year in Germany and Croatia. Rates of adverse reactions have been described by type (solicited, non-solicited; serious/non-serious; and adverse events of special interest) and stratified by vaccine brand. We calculated the frequency of adverse reaction after dose 1 and prior to dose 2 among all vaccinees who completed at least one follow-up questionnaire. RESULTS: Overall, 117,791 participants were included and completed the first questionnaire in addition to the baseline: 88,196 (74.9%) from Germany, 27,588 (23.4%) from Netherlands, 984 (0.8%) from France, 570 (0.5%) from Italy, 326 (0.3%) from Croatia, 89 (0.1%) from the UK and 38 (0.03%) from Belgium. There were 89,377 (75.9%) respondents who had received AstraZeneca vaccines, 14,658 (12.4%) BioNTech/Pfizer, 11,266 (9.6%) Moderna and 2490 (2.1%) Janssen vaccines as a first dose. Median age category was 40-49 years for all vaccines except for Pfizer where median age was 70-79 years. Most vaccinees were female with a female-to-male ratio of 1.34, 1.96 and 2.50 for AstraZeneca, Moderna and Janssen, respectively. BioNtech/Pfizer had slightly more men with a ratio of 0.82. Fatigue and headache were the most commonly reported solicited systemic adverse reactions and injection-site pain was the most common solicited local reaction. The rates of adverse events of special interest (AESIs) were 0.1-0.2% across all vaccine brands. CONCLUSION: This large-scale prospective study of COVID-19 vaccine recipients showed, for all the studied vaccines, a high frequency of systemic reactions, related to the immunogenic response, and local reactions at the injection site, while serious reactions or AESIs were uncommon, consistent with those reported on product labels. This study demonstrated the feasibility of setting up and conducting cohort event monitoring across multiple European countries to collect safety data on novel vaccines that are rolled out at scale in populations which may not have been included in pivotal trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Male , Humans , Aged , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Europe/epidemiology , Belgium
19.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 58(6): 647-658, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275777

ABSTRACT

In 2021, 47,412 HCT (19,806 (42%) allogeneic and 27,606 (58%) autologous) in 43,109 patients were reported by 694 European centers. 3494 patients received advanced cellular therapies, 2524 of which were CAR-T treatments, an additional 3245 received DLI. Changes compared to the previous year were CAR-T treatment (+35%), allogeneic HCT +5.4%, autologous HCT +3.9%, more pronounced in non-malignant disorders. Main indications for allogeneic HCT were myeloid malignancies 10,745 (58%), lymphoid malignancies 5127 (28%) and non-malignant disorders 2501 (13%). Main indications for autologous HCT were lymphoid malignancies 22,129 (90%) and solid tumors 1635 (7%). In allogeneic HCT, use of haploidentical donors decreased by -0.9% while use of unrelated and sibling donors increased by +4.3% and +9%. Cord blood HCT decreased by -5.8%. Pediatric HCT increased overall by +5.6% (+6.9% allogeneic and +1.6% autologous). Increase in the use of CAR-T was mainly restricted to high-income countries. The drop in HCT activity reported in 2020 partially recovered in 2021, the second year of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The transplant community confronted with the pandemic challenge, continued in providing patients access to treatment. This annual EBMT report reflects current activities useful for health care resource planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Neoplasms , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen , Humans , Child , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Europe/epidemiology
20.
Rural Remote Health ; 23(1): 8114, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274577

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused huge disruption to all communities and health care worldwide. This ongoing pandemic has encouraged international collaboration and cooperation, and this important activity needs to intensify further. Open Data sharing offers researchers the opportunity to compare public health and political responses and subsequent COVID-19 trends. METHODS: This project uses Open Data to summarise trends relating to COVID-19 cases, deaths and eventual engagement with vaccination campaigns for six countries in the Northern Periphery and Arctic Programme (i.e. Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Finland, Sweden, Norway). RESULTS: Countries examined fell into two groups - countries that achieved near elimination between smaller outbreaks, and those that did not. Rural areas generally experienced slower increases in COVID-19 activity than urban areas, presumably due to the lower density of population and other factors. Rural areas experienced approximately half the COVID-19 deaths when compared with more urbanised regions within the same countries. Interestingly, countries that opted for a more local approach to public health management, particularly Norway, seemed to control outbreaks more effectively than those with a more centralised approach. DISCUSSION: While contingent on the quality and reach of testing and reporting systems, Open Data can offer us useful insights to appraise national responses and provides context for public health-related decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Europe/epidemiology , Norway , Finland
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