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1.
Am Heart J ; 247: 33-41, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1652480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Activation of inflammatory pathways during acute myocardial infarction contributes to infarct size and left ventricular (LV) remodeling. The present prospective randomized clinical trial was designed to test the efficacy and safety of broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor to reduce infarct size. DESIGN: Controlled-Level EVERolimus in Acute Coronary Syndrome (CLEVER-ACS, clinicaltrials.gov NCT01529554) is a phase II randomized, double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled trial on the effects of a 5-day course of oral everolimus on infarct size, LV remodeling, and inflammation in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Within 5 days of successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), patients are randomly assigned to everolimus (first 3 days: 7.5 mg every day; days 4 and 5: 5.0 mg every day) or placebo, respectively. The primary efficacy outcome is the change from baseline (defined as 12 hours to 5 days after pPCI) to 30-day follow-up in myocardial infarct size as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Secondary endpoints comprise corresponding changes in cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers as well as microvascular obstruction and LV volumes assessed by CMRI. Clinical events, laboratory parameters, and blood cell counts are reported as safety endpoints at 30 days. CONCLUSION: The CLEVER-ACS trial tests the hypothesis whether mTOR inhibition using everolimus at the time of an acute STEMI affects LV infarct size following successful pPCI.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Anterior Wall Myocardial Infarction , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Acute Coronary Syndrome/drug therapy , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Double-Blind Method , Everolimus/therapeutic use , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Prospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Remodeling
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1020889

ABSTRACT

We present a kidney-pancreas transplant recipient who achieved complete recovery from COVID-19. A 45-year-old patient with T3 paraplegia underwent kidney-pancreas transplantation 18 years ago, followed by a subsequent kidney transplant 9 years ago, and presented with fever, hypoxia and hypotension after exposure to two confirmed cases of COVID-19. History of solid organ transplant, pre-existing renal impairment, asthma and an elevated D-dimer were identified as established risk factors for severe COVID-19. Supportive management was provided, baseline immunosuppression with everolimus was continued, and oral prednisolone was increased. A complete recovery was observed. Given the favourable outcome despite risk factors for severe COVID-19, we identify and review the potential mitigating roles of immunosuppression and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in this disease. Further investigation is required to establish whether mTOR inhibitors could be used as therapeutic agents to treat COVID-19, or as alternative immunosuppression implemented early in the COVID-19 disease course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation , Pancreas Transplantation , Paraplegia/complications , Accidents, Traffic , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/surgery , Everolimus/therapeutic use , Fever/physiopathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Hypotension/physiopathology , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
4.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(2): 428-434, 2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922877

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: We aimed to identify clinical settings of renal transplant patients with COVID-19. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, we included kidney transplant inpatients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 who had been discharged or had died by October 1st, 2020. Characteristics of the patients, including basal and last outpatient biochemical parameters were recorded. Discontinuation or dosage reduction of immunosuppressives and other treatment information was documented. Results: Twenty patients were included in this study, of whom 18 were discharged and 2 died in hospital. The mean duration of hospitalization and follow-up were 9.7 ± 6.4 days and 4.5 ± 2.0 months, respectively. Fourteen patients (70%) were male and mean age was 48.0 ± 10.3 years. At admission, all had immunosuppression withdrawn and were started on methylprednisolone 16 mg/ day (50%) or dexamethasone (50%). Tacrolimus/m-TOR inhibitors were reduced by 50% and all antimetabolites were discontinued. Hemodialysis was needed for 10% of patients. Acute kidney injury was detected in 25% of the patients. With respect to hospitalization time and complications, there was no significant difference between patients who used dexamethasone and those who did not (P > 0.05). The discontinued immunosuppressives were resumed within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge according to the severity of disease. No rehospitalization or acute rejection was detected during the follow-up of the patients. Conclusion: Renal transplant patients are considered a high risk group for COVID-19. It can be said that discontinuation or reducing dosages of immunosuppressives may be effective and safe in kidney transplant patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Deprescriptions , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Disease Progression , Everolimus/therapeutic use , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Renal Dialysis , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/physiopathology , Tacrolimus/therapeutic use
5.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 43(8): 457-463, 2020 Oct.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639589

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection has produced a pandemic with serious consequences for our health care system. Although liver transplant patients represent only a minority of the population, the hepatologists who follow these patients have tried to coordinate efforts to produce a protocol the management of immunosuppression during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although there are no solid studies to support general recommendations, experiences with other viral infections (hepatitis C, cytomegalovirus) suggest that management of immunosuppression without mycophenolate mofetil or m-Tor inhibitors (drugs that are also associated with leukopenia and lymphopenia) may be beneficial. It is also important to pay attention to possible drug interactions, especially in the case of tacrolimus, with some of the treatments with antiviral effect given in the context of COVID 19 (lopinavir/ritonavir, azithromycin). Finally, the immunosuppressive effect of immunomodulating drugs (tocilizumab and similar) administered to patients with severe lung disease should be taken into account. The mechanisms of action of the different immunosuppressive drugs are reviewed in this article, as well as their potential effect on SARS-CoV-2 infection, and suggests guidelines for the management of immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Liver Transplantation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adaptive Immunity , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Calcineurin Inhibitors/adverse effects , Calcineurin Inhibitors/pharmacology , Calcineurin Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Contraindications, Drug , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Drug Interactions , Everolimus/adverse effects , Everolimus/pharmacology , Everolimus/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Mycophenolic Acid/pharmacology , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Postoperative Complications/immunology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sirolimus/adverse effects , Sirolimus/pharmacology , Sirolimus/therapeutic use , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
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