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1.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(1): 10-12, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598751

ABSTRACT

Health care studies that use Q methodology have increased dramatically in recent years, but most nurses have not learned about this mixed methods approach in their research classes. This teaching column will help readers understand some of the unique terms and characteristics of Q methodology. Understanding this method can help nurses performing evidence-based practice and education. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(1):10-12.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Continuing , Reading , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Learning
2.
Syst Rev ; 10(1): 317, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was identified as the cause of an acute respiratory disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Given the lack of validated treatments, there is an urgent need for a high-quality management of COVID-19. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are one tool that healthcare providers may use to enhance patient care. As such, it is necessary that they have access to high-quality evidence-based CPGs upon which they may base decisions regarding the management and use of therapeutic interventions (TI) for COVID-19. The purpose of the proposed study is to assess the quality of CPGs that make management or TI recommendations for COVID-19 using the AGREE II instrument. METHODS: The proposed systematic review will identify CPGs for TI use and/or the management of COVID-19. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases, as well as the Guidelines International Network, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, and the World Health Organization websites, will be searched from December 2019 onwards. The primary outcome of this study is the assessed quality of the CPGs. The quality of eligible CPGs will be assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. Descriptive statistics will be used to quantify the quality of the CPGs. The secondary outcomes of this study are the types of management and/or TI recommendations made. Inconsistent and duplicate TI and/or management recommendations made between CPGs will be compared across guidelines. To summarize and explain the findings related to the included CPGs, a narrative synthesis will also be provided. DISCUSSION: The results of this study will be of utmost importance to enhancing clinical decision-making among healthcare providers caring for patients with COVID-19. Moreover, the results of this study will be relevant to guideline developers in the creation of CPGs or improvement of existing ones, researchers who want to identify gaps in knowledge, and policy-makers looking to encourage and endorse the adoption of CPGs into clinical practice. The results of this review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at conferences. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: International Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO)- CRD42020219944.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Databases, Factual , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512290

ABSTRACT

This participatory action research study was conducted to confirm the implementation process and effect of developing and applying a preceptor education program based on the One-Minute Preceptor Model to foster the competence of preceptor clinical nurses. The study was conducted for eight weeks from March 2020 on 30 preceptor nurses in South Korea. Nursing standards were developed for two weeks and six cycles (comprising four stages) were performed. Data collection was integrated using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. For quantitative data, the Clinical Core Competency of Preceptor (CCCP) and General Communication Competence Scale (GICC-15) results were collected from preceptor nurses through questionnaires. Reflection journals of nurses' experiences were also analyzed through content analysis and frequency of keywords using WordClouds. There was no significant change in CCCP or GICC-15 results among preceptor nurses. However, nurses' experiences were associated with the growth and development of competencies such as evidence-based practice, quality feedback, and self-reflection. The program was effective in developing nurse competencies. Therefore, it is necessary to encourage One-Minute Preceptor Model activities among preceptors through an action research approach and to actively support research and practice in clinical settings, as well as to provide organizational and systematic support.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Preceptorship , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Services Research , Humans , Program Evaluation , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 568-572, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503696

ABSTRACT

The Institute of Medicine recommends residency programs be implemented for new graduates across all settings, yet hospitals have not consistently hardwired this into their organizations. The value proposition is in recruitment, retention, and the conservation of resources. New Jersey's experiences using the US Department of Labor apprenticeship model for nurse residency programs provides a strategy that can be implemented on a statewide basis.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing , Internship, Nonmedical/standards , Personnel Loyalty , COVID-19 , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Internship, Nonmedical/economics , New Jersey
8.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e039246, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare is increasingly challenged to meet the demands of user involvement and knowledge mobilisation required by the 21st-century patient-centred and knowledge-based economies. Innovations are needed to reduce problematic barriers to knowledge exchange and improve collaborative problem solving. Living labs, as open knowledge systems, have the potential to address these gaps but are underexplored in healthcare. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct the first systematic review of living labs across healthcare contexts. We will comprehensively search the following online databases from inception to 31 December 2020: Scopus, the Cochrane Library (Wiley), Medline (OVID), Embase (OVID), Web of Science, PsycINFO (OVID) and EBSCOhost databases including Academic Search Complete, Business Source Premier, Canadian Reference Centre, CINAHL, MasterFILE Premier, SPORTDiscus, Library & Information Science Source, Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, AgeLine, EconLit, Art Full Text, Women's Studies International and Social Work Abstracts. We will search for grey literature using Google advanced techniques and books/book chapters through scholarly and bibliographical databases. We will use a dual-reviewer, two-step selection process with pre-established inclusion criteria and limit to English language publications. Empirical studies of any design examining living lab development, implementation or evaluation in health or healthcare will be included. We will use the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) for methodological quality appraisal and Covidence software for review management, and we will extract data on pre-established variables such as lab context and technological platforms. We will create evidence tables and analyse across variables such as focal aim and achievement of living lab principles, such as the use of cocreation and multimethod approaches. We will tabulate data for descriptive reporting and narrative synthesis to identify current applications, approaches and promising areas for living lab development across health contexts. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was not required for this review. This review will inform research into living labs in health environments, including guidance for a living lab in paediatric rehabilitation. Academic publications shared through collaborative networks and social media channels will provide substantive knowledge to the growing tech-health development sector and to researchers, practitioners and organisations seeking enhanced patient/stakeholder engagement and innovations in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020175275.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Canada , Child , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Organizations , Review Literature as Topic
9.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257988, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440994

ABSTRACT

To increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake in resistant populations, such as Republicans, focus groups suggest that it is best to de-politicize the issue by sharing five facts from a public health expert. Yet polls suggest that Trump voters trust former President Donald Trump for medical advice more than they trust experts. We conducted an online, randomized, national experiment among 387 non-vaccinated Trump voters, using two brief audiovisual artifacts from Spring 2021, either facts delivered by an expert versus political claims delivered by President Trump. Relative to the control group, Trump voters who viewed the video of Trump endorsing the vaccine were 85% more likely to answer "yes" as opposed to "no" in their intention to get fully vaccinated (RRR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.40; P = .048). There were no significant differences between those hearing the public health expert excerpt and the control group (for "yes" relative to "no" RRR = 1.14, 95% CI 0.61 to 2.12; P = .68). These findings suggest that a political speaker's endorsement of the COVID-19 vaccine may increase uptake among those who identify with that speaker. Contrary to highly-publicized focus group findings, our randomized experiment found that an expert's factually accurate message may not be effectual to increase vaccination intentions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Communications Media , Politics , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Intention , Public Health , Random Allocation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust
10.
BMJ Evid Based Med ; 26(5): 228-230, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438078
11.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 18(5): 244-246, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434853

ABSTRACT

Health information and communication fall within patient preferences in evidence-based practice. Now more than ever, patients and families in the community have free access to "evidence" and healthcare information on the internet. However, is that information trustworthy, and how can we encourage people to use evidence to promote their optimal health and wellness? The recent rise of global spread of mis- and disinformation through social media outlets has affected public health. There is growing recognition that social media platforms provide magnified podiums leading to unfortunate outcomes. While much work has been done during the COVID-19 pandemic to address health misinformation, there is still much more work to do. We must respond to the widespread misinformation as a collective healthcare community to prevent poor healthcare decisions. Urging the public to be alert to information spread, assess the quality of health information (and whether it is evidence-based), and use shared decision-making tools is a path we can travel together.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Communication , Evidence-Based Practice/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice/statistics & numerical data , Health Promotion/methods , Patient Preference/psychology , Social Media , Decision Making , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(8): 1146-1148, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344230
13.
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs ; 50(4): 485-495, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338436

ABSTRACT

An extensive review of new resources to support the provision of evidence-based care for women and infants. The current column includes a discussion of how fetal monitoring may lead to overuse of birth-related interventions, commentaries on reviews focused on bedsharing, and women's lifetime estrogen exposure and risk of cardiovascular mortality.


Subject(s)
Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Infant
16.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2716-2721, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325028

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline nursing home staff faced extraordinary stressors including high infection and mortality rates and ever-changing and sometimes conflicting federal and state regulations. To support nursing homes in evidence-based infection control practices, the Massachusetts Senior Care Association and Hebrew SeniorLife partnered with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ ECHO National Nursing Home COVID-19 Action Network (the network). This educational program provided 16 weeks of free weekly virtual sessions to 295 eligible nursing homes, grouped into nine cohorts of 30-33 nursing homes. Eighty-three percent of eligible nursing homes in Massachusetts participated in the Network, and Hebrew SeniorLife's Training Center served the vast majority. Each cohort was led by geriatrics clinicians and nursing home leaders, and coaches trained in quality improvement. The interactive sessions provided timely updates on COVID-19 infection control best practices to improve care and also created a peer-to-peer learning community to share ongoing challenges and potential solutions. The weekly Network meetings were a source of connection, emotional support, and validation and may be a valuable mechanism to support resilience and well-being for nursing home staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Nursing Homes , Online Social Networking , Resilience, Psychological , Skilled Nursing Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/education , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Nursing Homes/standards , Nursing Homes/trends , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Skilled Nursing Facilities/standards , Skilled Nursing Facilities/trends , Social Support
17.
Int J Technol Assess Health Care ; 37(1): e77, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315573

ABSTRACT

Emergency preparedness is a continuous quality improvement process through which roles and responsibilities are defined to effectively anticipate, respond to, and recover from the impact of emergencies. This process results in documented plans that provide a backbone structure for developing the core capacities to address health threats. Nevertheless, several barriers can impair an effective preparedness planning, as it needs a 360° perspective to address each component according to the best evidence and practice. Preparedness planning shares common principles with health technology assessment (HTA) as both encompass a multidisciplinary and multistakeholder approach, follow an iterative cycle, adopt a 360° perspective on the impact of intervention measures, and conclude with decision-making support. Our "Perspective" illustrates how each HTA domain can address different component(s) of a preparedness plan that can indeed be seen as a container of multiple HTAs, which can then be used to populate the entire plan itself. This approach can allow one to overcome preparedness barriers, providing an independent, systematic, and robust tool to address the components and ensuring a comprehensive evaluation of their value in the mitigation of the impact of emergencies.


Subject(s)
Civil Defense/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Technology Assessment, Biomedical/organization & administration , Civil Defense/economics , Civil Defense/standards , Disaster Planning/economics , Disaster Planning/standards , Evidence-Based Practice/standards , Humans
18.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2708-2715, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301523

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has exacted a disproportionate toll on the health of persons living in nursing homes. Healthcare providers and other decision-makers in those settings must refer to multiple evolving sources of guidance to coordinate care delivery in such a way as to minimize the introduction and spread of the causal virus, SARS-CoV-2. It is essential that guidance be presented in an accessible and usable format to facilitate its translation into evidence-based best practice. In this article, we propose the Haddon matrix as a tool well-suited to this task. The Haddon matrix is a conceptual model that organizes influencing factors into pre-event, event, and post-event phases, and into host, agent, and environment domains akin to the components of the epidemiologic triad. The Haddon matrix has previously been applied to topics relevant to the care of older persons, such as fall prevention, as well as to pandemic planning and response. Presented here is a novel application of the Haddon matrix to pandemic response in nursing homes, with practical applications for nursing home decision-makers in their efforts to prevent and contain COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Infection Control , Models, Organizational , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Evidence-Based Practice/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/trends , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/standards , Health Services for the Aged/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e050033, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297976

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are increasingly used to upskill health and care providers, including in surgical, nursing and acute care settings. Many studies have used AR/VR to deliver training, providing mixed evidence on their effectiveness and limited evidence regarding contextual factors that influence effectiveness and implementation. This review will develop, test and refine an evidence-informed programme theory on what facilitates or constrains the implementation of AR or VR programmes in health and care settings and understand how, for whom and to what extent they 'work'. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This realist review adheres to the Realist And Meta-narrative Evidence Syntheses: Evolving Standards (RAMESES) standards and will be conducted in three steps: theory elicitation, theory testing and theory refinement. First, a search will identify practitioner, academic and learning and technology adoption theories from databases (MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Embase, Education Resources Information Center, PsycINFO and Web of Science), practitioner journals, snowballing and grey literature. Information regarding contexts, mechanisms and outcomes will be extracted. A narrative synthesis will determine overlapping configurations and form an initial theory. Second, the theory will be tested using empirical evidence located from the above databases and identified from the first search. Quality will be assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT), and relevant information will be extracted into a coding sheet. Third, the extracted information will be compared with the initial programme theory, with differences helping to make refinements. Findings will be presented as a narrative summary, and the MMAT will determine our confidence in each configuration. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required. This review will develop an evidence-informed programme theory. The results will inform and support AR/VR interventions from clinical educators, healthcare providers and software developers. Upskilling through AR/VR learning interventions may improve quality of care and promote evidence-based practice and continued learning. Findings will be disseminated through conference presentations and peer-reviewed journal articles.


Subject(s)
Virtual Reality , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Personnel , Humans , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
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