Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 59
Filter
1.
Am J Emerg Med ; 54: 324.e5-324.e7, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748330

ABSTRACT

Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) is a recently defined clinical entity characterized by pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae with associated mucositis and frequent cutaneous lesions of a characteristic pattern. Although often similar in presentation, MIRM has distinct clinical and histologic features that are different from erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. We report a case of MIRM in a nine-year-old boy.


Subject(s)
Erythema Multiforme , Exanthema , Mucositis , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma , Stevens-Johnson Syndrome , Child , Erythema Multiforme/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Humans , Male , Mucositis/complications , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/complications , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/diagnosis , Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/etiology
2.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096211066283, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745526

ABSTRACT

The immunization against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) via vaccination serves as a significant milestone in the fight against the pandemic. Rapid introduction of various COVID-19 vaccines to stem the spread of virus has researchers scrambling to document the adverse effects left in its wake. Thus far, there have been singular examples of cutaneous vasculitis associated with COVID-19. A history of vasculitis leaves little error to miss its inclusion in diagnostic differentials. It also invokes the physiologic possibility that afflicted patients possess a more susceptible landscape for recurrence that was then triggered by the vaccine when compared with those who lack similar history. In our case report, we build on those findings with one of the first documented examples of vaccination-induced vasculitic rash in a previously asymptomatic patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exanthema , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Exanthema/etiology , Humans , Vaccination
3.
Cleve Clin J Med ; 89(3): 161-167, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726177

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous findings can be clues to diagnosis and infection severity in viral illnesses, including COVID-19. The authors provide an update on the diagnostic and prognostic value of the 5 most common cutaneous abnormalities associated with COVID-19 in adult patients: morbilliform rash, urticaria, vesicles, pseudo-chilblains, and vaso-occlusive lesions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exanthema , Skin Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Exanthema/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin/pathology , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/etiology
5.
Intern Med ; 61(7): 1113-1114, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666882
6.
Am J Dermatopathol ; 44(3): 183-189, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608833

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A new entity, which occurs a few weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection and resembling incomplete Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome, has been defined and named multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 in children. The aim of our study was to describe histopathological characteristics of skin lesions of MIS-C patients to reveal whether there is a relationship between histopathological features and clinical manifestations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen who had skin involvement of 57 patients who were diagnosed with MIS-C between December 2020 and February 2021 were included in this prospective study. Demographic information, laboratory findings, and patients' managements were recorded. Skin biopsies were taken simultaneously of each patient. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin samples were examined microscopically. RESULTS: The rate of skin rash was 30% in patients with MIS-C and was predominantly the maculopapular type. The anatomical distribution of the rash was evaluated as localized in 10 and generalized in 7 patients. In patients with myocarditis, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were found to be significantly higher, and lymphocyte and albumin values were found to be low. Herpes-like inclusions were found in the microscopic examination of 2 patients with a history of zona zoster in themselves or in their mother. There was a significant difference between keratinocyte necrosis and some clinical parameters. DISCUSSION: Localized skin lesions appear to be associated with a more severe inflammatory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Exanthema/etiology , Skin/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biopsy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Exanthema/immunology , Exanthema/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Skin/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
7.
Pediatrics ; 149(1)2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595609

ABSTRACT

A 9-year-old girl presented to her primary care pediatrician via telemedicine during the initial months of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic because of 4 days of warmth perceived by her mother, decreased energy, and a new rash on her upper extremities. After 10 additional days of documented fever >38°C, worsening fatigue, and 1 day of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, she was allowed to schedule an in-person visit with her pediatrician after testing negative for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. She appeared ill on arrival to clinic, and her pediatrician recommended evaluation in an emergency department. Her initial laboratory testing revealed nonspecific elevation in several inflammatory markers and leukopenia, and she responded well to intravenous hydration. Over the next 2 weeks, her fever persisted, constitutional symptoms worsened, and she developed progressively painful cervical lymphadenopathy and pancytopenia. She was evaluated in clinic by several specialists and eventually was urged to present to the emergency department again, at which time she was admitted to the PICU. After consulting additional specialists and waiting for laboratory results, the team reached a definitive diagnosis and initiated therapy; however, she experienced rapid clinical decline shortly thereafter. The specialists who assisted with identification of the underlying etiology of her symptoms were able to work together to manage the subsequent complications.


Subject(s)
Exanthema , Fever , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Telemedicine , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Disease Progression , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis/diagnosis , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/blood , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lymphadenopathy/diagnosis , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Pancytopenia/diagnosis , Symptom Assessment , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
8.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 590, 2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adult patients with coronavirus disease present primarily with respiratory symptoms, but children and some adults may display a more systemic inflammatory syndrome with rash, fever, mucosal changes, and elevated inflammatory biomarkers. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we report the case of a 29-year-old Hispanic patient presenting with significant rash and multisystem inflammation. We describe his clinical course, review dermatological manifestations of coronavirus disease, and summarize the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease-associated multisystem inflammation. CONCLUSION: This case should alert physicians to the atypical nature of presenting rash with minimal respiratory symptoms in coronavirus disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exanthema , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Exanthema/etiology , Fever/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
9.
Arch Pediatr ; 28(7): 573-575, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491712

ABSTRACT

In the context of the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, cutaneous lesions are being described. Here, we report on a 13-year-old girl with SARS-CoV-2-associated Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. She presented without any respiratory symptoms, only a purpuric skin rash, abdominal pain, low-grade fever, and pharyngitis. Virology tests by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were positive for SARS-CoV-2 and EBV. The potential association of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and SARS-CoV-2 should be kept in mind in order to reduce the spread of the virus, particularly in children with few respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/diagnosis , Herpesvirus 4, Human/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Adolescent , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/complications , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics , Humans , Pharyngitis/etiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
10.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(10): 2243-2248, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491170

ABSTRACT

In a large regional observational cohort study of adult (≥ 18 years), outpatients with COVID-19, prevalence, characteristics, and outcome of patients with rash and/or chilblain-like lesions (CLL), compared with population without cutaneous features, were studied. In total, 28,957 outpatients were included; the prevalence of rash and CCL were 9.5% and 3.7%, respectively. Presence of rash was significantly associated with presence of asthenia, shivers or myalgia, respiratory and gastro-intestinal symptoms, and anosmia/ageusia. The presence of CCL was associated with chest pain, chest oppression, nausea/vomiting, and anosmia/ageusia. Patients with CCL were significantly less prone to an unfavourable outcome (hospitalization or death).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Chilblains/etiology , Exanthema/etiology , Adult , Aged , Chilblains/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Exanthema/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(2): 455-456, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371816
13.
Arch Pediatr ; 28(7): 573-575, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358159

ABSTRACT

In the context of the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, cutaneous lesions are being described. Here, we report on a 13-year-old girl with SARS-CoV-2-associated Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. She presented without any respiratory symptoms, only a purpuric skin rash, abdominal pain, low-grade fever, and pharyngitis. Virology tests by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were positive for SARS-CoV-2 and EBV. The potential association of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and SARS-CoV-2 should be kept in mind in order to reduce the spread of the virus, particularly in children with few respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/diagnosis , Herpesvirus 4, Human/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Adolescent , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/complications , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics , Humans , Pharyngitis/etiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
14.
15.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(10): 2243-2248, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306704

ABSTRACT

In a large regional observational cohort study of adult (≥ 18 years), outpatients with COVID-19, prevalence, characteristics, and outcome of patients with rash and/or chilblain-like lesions (CLL), compared with population without cutaneous features, were studied. In total, 28,957 outpatients were included; the prevalence of rash and CCL were 9.5% and 3.7%, respectively. Presence of rash was significantly associated with presence of asthenia, shivers or myalgia, respiratory and gastro-intestinal symptoms, and anosmia/ageusia. The presence of CCL was associated with chest pain, chest oppression, nausea/vomiting, and anosmia/ageusia. Patients with CCL were significantly less prone to an unfavourable outcome (hospitalization or death).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Chilblains/etiology , Exanthema/etiology , Adult , Aged , Chilblains/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Exanthema/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
17.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 521-532, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252652

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous findings have increasingly been reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This review discusses associated skin findings in patients with COVID-19 in the inpatient setting, ranging from vasculopathy-related lesions associated with high hospitalization rate and poor prognosis to inflammatory vesicular and urticarial eruptions that are rarely associated with prolonged hospitalization. We also discuss other reported COVID-19 cutaneous manifestations such as Sweet's syndrome, purpuric eruptions, and Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children. Although the relationship between dermatologic changes and COVID-19 disease progression is not fully elucidated, familiarity with cutaneous manifestations is valuable for physicians caring for patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and may help improve disease recognition and care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , Chilblains/diagnosis , Chilblains/etiology , Child , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Humans , Pityriasis Rosea/diagnosis , Pityriasis Rosea/etiology , Skin Diseases, Vascular/diagnosis , Skin Diseases, Vascular/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Urticaria/diagnosis , Urticaria/etiology
18.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(236): 399-401, 2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257582

ABSTRACT

As the current COVID-19 pandemic is evolving, skin lesions are being reported more, the most common skin manifestation being morbilliform rashes. We describe a patient of severe COVID-19 infection, 48-year-old who initially presented with fever, cough and constitutional symptoms who developed morbilliform macular rashes during his illness. The rash appeared on 6th day of illness in the trunk, arms with sparing of palms and soles, associated with itching. He later developed features of the cytokine-storm syndrome. The exact mechanism for the rashes is yet to be elaborated, however, it is postulated that it is either due to immune-mediated vasodilation or micro thrombosis secondary to low-grade-coagulopathy associated with COVID-19. Recognition of rashes as a feature of this disease is particularly significant to clinicians as it aids in early diagnosis, particularly in resource-poor countries. There is no evident association, however, between the severity and the rashes in COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exanthema , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pruritus , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Cutis ; 107(4): 209-215, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239179

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19-SARS-CoV-2-are common and varied. Morbilliform, vesicular, and urticarial eruptions may be nonspecific initial features of the disease. Chilblainlike lesions on the fingers or toes typically occur as part of a resolution phase, signifying a milder course, whereas livedoid lesions and retiform purpura are associated with coaguloapthy and more severe disease. Additionally, a severe Kawasaki-like multisystem inflammatory syndrome rarely is seen in children. This diverse range of cutaneous manifestations in COVID-19 reflects a spectrum of host immunologic responses to SARS-CoV-2 and may inform disease pathophysiology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Dermatology , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Purpura/diagnosis , Purpura/etiology , Skin/pathology , Skin Diseases/virology , Skin Diseases, Viral/diagnosis , Skin Diseases, Viral/etiology , Urticaria/diagnosis , Urticaria/etiology
20.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 19(9): 858-864, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231667

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus epidemic continues, a host of new cutaneous complications is seen on the faces of frontline healthcare workers wearing personal protective equipment on a daily basis. To minimize the risk of COVID-19 infection, healthcare workers wear tight-fitting masks that lead to an excessive amount of pressure on the facial skin. Mechanical pressure, mask materials, and perspiration can all lead to various types of cutaneous lesions such as indentations of the face, skin tears, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, ulceration, crusting, erythema, and infection. The objective of this article is to provide effective and straightforward recommendations to those health care providers using facial masks in order to prevent skin-related complications. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(9):858-864. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5259.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Facial Dermatoses/etiology , Facial Injuries/etiology , Masks/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Erythema/etiology , Erythema/physiopathology , Exanthema/etiology , Exanthema/physiopathology , Facial Dermatoses/physiopathology , Facial Injuries/epidemiology , Facial Injuries/physiopathology , Female , Global Health , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Assessment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL