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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809898

ABSTRACT

Increasing numbers of individuals suffer from post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS), which manifests with persistent symptoms, the most prevalent being dyspnea, fatigue, and musculoskeletal, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments. This systematic review investigated the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions for individuals with PACS. We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, CINHAL, Scopus, Prospero, and PEDro databases and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) up to November 2021. We screened 516 citations for eligibility, i.e., trials that included individuals with PACS exposed to exercise-based rehabilitation interventions. Five RCTs were included, accounting for 512 participants (aged 49.2-69.4 years, 65% males). Based on the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool (RoB 2.0), two RCTs had "low risk of bias", and three were in the "some concerns" category. Three RCTs compared experimental rehabilitation interventions with no or minimal rehabilitation, while two compared two active rehabilitation interventions. Rehabilitation seemed to improve dyspnea, anxiety, and kinesiophobia. Results on pulmonary function were inconsistent, while improvements were detected in muscle strength, walking capacity, sit-to-stand performance, and quality of life. Pending further studies based on qualitatively sound designs, these first findings seem to advocate for rehabilitation interventions to lessen disability due to PACS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea , Exercise Therapy/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Quality of Life
2.
Lupus ; 31(4): 443-456, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736231

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the perceptions and acceptability of a home-based exercise intervention in systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) adolescent patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to explore the effects of the intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), sleep quality, and mental health conditions parameters. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial of a 12-week, home-based exercise training program conducted between October and December 2020. During this period, social distancing measures were in place in Brazil to contain the spread of COVID-19. Adolescent patients diagnosed with JSLE and JIA participated in the study. Health-related qualitative and quantitative data were collected before and after the follow-up. RESULTS: 21 JSLE patients and 30 JIA patients were analyzed. Six themes emerged from patients' feedback: 1) Suitability of the home-based format; 2) Appropriate trainer supervision, 3) Motivators and facilitators for the program; 4) Barriers to the program; 5) Health benefits; 6) Patients' suggestions to improve the program. Overall, data indicated that the intervention showed good acceptability and elicited improvements in the perceived HRQoL and fatigue in JIA and JSLE patients during the pandemic. However, further quantitative analyses with validated HRQoL, sleep quality, and mental health conditions instruments did not capture these benefits (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Our main findings based on in-depth qualitative assessments suggest that a home-based exercise training program was suitable and well-accepted by adolescents with JSLE and JIA during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonetheless, adherence was not high, particularly among JIA patients, suggesting that facilitators and barriers identified in the current study should be explored to improve the quality of new home-based exercise programs implementation, particularly in a future emerging crisis.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Juvenile/therapy , COVID-19 , Exercise Therapy/methods , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Adolescent , Brazil , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732042

ABSTRACT

Computer workers' sedentary work, together with less active lifestyles, aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic, represents a high risk for many chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in health-related quality of life (QoL). Workplace exercises consist of a set of physical exercises, implemented during work breaks, that have multiple benefits for workers' health. AIM: To assess the impact of online workplace exercises on computer workers' perception of quality of life. METHODS: Quasi-experimental study with two groups: a control group (n = 26) and an intervention group (n = 13). The inclusion criteria were that participants must be aged between 18 and 65 years old and the exclusion criteria included diagnosis of non-work-related medical conditions. The interventions consisted of workplace exercises, which were applied for 17 consecutive weeks, each session lasting 15 min, three times a week. The exercise programme, performed online and guided by a physiotherapist, consisted of mobility exercises, flexibility and strength exercises, with the help of a TheraBand® for elastic resistance. The control group were not subjected to any intervention. A socio-demographic questionnaire and the Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36v2) were used in two assessment stages (M0-baseline and M1-final of intervention). A mixed ANOVA with interaction time*group was used to evaluate the effect of the exercise programme. RESULTS: A good perception of the QoL was obtained in both stages. The exercise programme had a positive effect in the domains of Pain (ptime*group = 0.012, η2p = 0.158), Physical Function (ptime*group = 0.078, η2p = 0.082), Physical Performance (ptime*group = 0.052, η2p = 0.098), and Emotional Performance (ptime*group = 0.128, η2p = 0.061). CONCLUSION: After 17 weeks of workplace exercises, it became clear that the intervention group positively increased their QoL perception, with this improvement being significant in the Pain domain, which resulted in an improvement in their health condition. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the optimal exercise for CWs, with detailed exercise types, different intensities and focused on various health conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computers , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace , Young Adult
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e052631, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673432

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Physical activity is important for healthy ageing. Despite strong evidence on the benefits of physical activity for health and well-being, physical inactivity remains a significant problem among older adults. This study aims to determine the feasibility and acceptability of implementing an online volunteer-led group exercise for older adults. METHODS: A quasi-experimental mixed-methods approach will be used in this study. A training programme will be developed to train volunteers to deliver online group exercises to older adults aged >65 years (n=30). The primary outcome is the feasibility of implementing the intervention. This will be assessed by the number of volunteers recruited, trained, and retained at the end of the study, and the number of exercise sessions delivered and completed by participants. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels measured using the Community Health Model Activities Programme for Seniors questionnaire, Barthel Index, EQ-5D-5L as a measure of health-related quality of life, SARC-F to determine sarcopenia status, and PRIMSA-7 to determine frailty status. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and at 6 months.Qualitative interviews will be conducted with volunteers(n=5), older adults (n=10) and family members (n=5) to explore their views on the intervention. ANALYSIS: Simple descriptive statistics will be used to describe participant characteristics, the feasibility of the study and the impact of the intervention on health outcomes. Parametric(t-test) or non-parametric(Mann-Whitney U test) statistics will be used to analyse continuous variables. χ2 test will be used for categorical variables. Qualitative data will be analysed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study received ethical approval from the University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee and Research Integrity and Governance committee (ID: 52 967 .A1). Study findings will be made available to service users, voluntary organisations and other researchers who may be interested in implementing the intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04672200.


Subject(s)
Frailty , Quality of Life , Aged , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Feasibility Studies , Humans
5.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 9(1)2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627443

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Exercise is important in the postoperative management of lung cancer, yet no strong evidence exists for delivery of home-based programmes. Our feasibility (phase I) study established feasibility of a home-based exercise and self-management programme (the programme) delivered postoperatively. This efficacy (phase II) study aims to determine whether the programme, compared with usual care, is effective in improving physical function (primary outcome) in patients after lung cancer surgery. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This will be a prospective, multisite, two-arm parallel 1:1, randomised controlled superiority trial with assessors blinded to group allocation. 112 participants scheduled for surgery for lung cancer will be recruited and randomised to usual care (no exercise programme) or, usual care plus the 12-week programme. The primary outcome is physical function measured with the EORTC QLQ c30 questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality of life (HRQoL); exercise capacity; muscle strength; physical activity levels and patient reported outcomes. HRQoL and patient-reported outcomes will be measured to 12 months, and survival to 5 years. In a substudy, patient experience interviews will be conducted in a subgroup of intervention participants. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was gained from all sites. Results will be submitted for publications in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001283369.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms , Self-Management , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(12): 1148-1151, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604793

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this observational study was to report the experience of a 1-yr home training with functional electrical stimulation cycling of a person with T4 American Impairment Scale A paraplegia for 9 yrs, homebound due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The 40-yr-old participant had a three-phase training: V1, isometric stimulation; V2, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 3 sessions/wk; and V3, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 2-4 sessions/wk. Data on general and physical tolerance, health impact, and performance were collected. Borg Scale score relating to fatigue was 10.1 before training and 11.8 after training. The average score for satisfaction at the end of sessions was 8.7. Lean leg mass increased more than 29%, although total bone mineral density dropped by 1.6%. The ventilatory thresholds increased from 19.5 to 29% and the maximum ventilatory peak increased by 9.5%. Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale score returned to its highest level by the end of training. For the only track event on a competition bike, the pilot covered a distance of 1607.8 m in 17 mins 49 secs. When functional electrical stimulation cycling training is based on a clear and structured protocol, it offers the person with paraplegia the opportunity to practice this activity recreationally and athletically. In times of crisis, this training has proven to be very relevant.


Subject(s)
Bicycling/physiology , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Paraplegia/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Paraplegia/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Case Studies as Topic , Treatment Outcome
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260889, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately 40-70% of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) fall each year, causing decreased activity levels and quality of life. Current fall-prevention strategies include the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. To increase the accessibility of this vulnerable population, we developed a multidisciplinary telemedicine program using an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform. We hypothesized that the risk for falling in PD would decrease among participants receiving a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program added to standard office-based neurological care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention to decrease the incidence of falls in patients with PD. METHODS: Ongoing, longitudinal, randomized, single-blinded, case-control, clinical trial. We will include 76 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD with a high risk of falling and limited access to multidisciplinary care. The intervention group (n = 38) will receive multidisciplinary remote care in addition to standard medical care, and the control group (n = 38) standard medical care only. Nutrition, sarcopenia and frailty status, motor, non-motor symptoms, health-related quality of life, caregiver burden, falls, balance and gait disturbances, direct and non-medical costs will be assessed using validated rating scales. RESULTS: This study will provide a cost-effectiveness assessment of multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention for fall reduction in PD, in addition to standard neurological medical care. CONCLUSION: In this challenging initiative, we will determine whether a multidisciplinary telemedicine intervention program can reduce falls, as an alternative intervention option for PD patients with restricted access to multidisciplinary care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04694443.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , Gait , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
9.
Clin Rehabil ; 36(4): 486-497, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of two different exercise-based programs through telerehabilitation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, parallel, double-blinded, three-arm clinical trial. SETTING: Patients' homes through telerehabilitation devices. SUBJECTS: Subjects with coronavirus disease 2019 in the acute phase. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were divided into three groups: breathing exercises group, strength exercises group or no treatment/control group. MAIN MEASURES: We analysed visual analogue scale for fatigue, 6-minute walking test, 30-seconds sit-to-stand test, multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire and Borg scale at baseline and 14 days later. RESULTS: From 93 subjects recruited, 88 were enrolled, and 77 patients (mean [SD] age 39.40 [11.71]) completed the 14-days intervention and were included in the analysis: 26 in strength exercises group, 29 in breathing exercises group and 22 in control group. The intergroup analysis shows significant differences between the study groups and control group in all variables (p < 0.05); Borg scale, multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire (pre-post intervention score: strength exercises group: 7.85 [6.82] - 4.54[4.82], breathing exercises group: 11.04 [6.49] - 5.32 [3.63], control group: 10.27 [6.49] - 10.59[6.58]), visual analogue scale for fatigue, 6-minute walking test and 30-seconds sit-to-stand test (pre-post intervention score: strength exercises group: 12.19 [4.42] - 13.58 [5.37], breathing exercises group: 11.18 [3.42] - 12.79 [4.00], control group: 10.45 [2.15] - 9.86[1.88]). The greatest effect sizes were found in the variables Borg Scale (R2 = 0.548) and multidimensional dyspnoea-12 questionnaire (R2 = 0.475). CONCLUSIONS: Strength exercises group and breathing exercises group obtained significant improvements in fatigue, dyspnoea, perceived effort, and physical state, compared to control group, although the greatest benefits were found for dyspnoea and aerobic capacity in breathing exercises group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Adult , Breathing Exercises/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/methods
10.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 159, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Exercise has been suggested to prevent deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and overall health in pediatric rheumatologic diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Herein we describe the effects of a 12-week, home-based, exercise program on overall health and quality of life among quarantined patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). METHOD: This prospective, quasi-experimental, mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) study was conducted between July and December 2020, during the most restricted period of COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. The home-based exercise program consisted of a 12-week, three-times-a-week, aerobic and strengthening (bodyweight) training program. Qualitative data were systematically evaluated. Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQOL) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) evaluate symptoms of mental health disorder, HRQL, and quality of sleep. FINDINGS: 11 patients (out of 27) met the inclusion criteria (91% female; mean ± SD age: 13.5 ± 3.2 years). Adherence to the intervention was 72.6%. Barriers to exercise involved poor internet connectivity, excessive weekly sessions, and other commitments. Even though not statistically significant, Self-report SDQ subscales Total Difficulties Score, Emotional Problems Score, and PedsQOL School Functioning Score improved after intervention (- 2.4; 95%confidence interval [CI] -5.1; 0.2, p = 0.06; - 1.0; 95%CI -2.2; 0.2, p = 0.09 and; 11.7; 95%CI -2.5; 25.8, p = 0.09, respectively). Remaining SDQ subscales were not altered. Six themes emerged from patients' and parents' comments (qualitative results). Patients engaged in exercise reported other health-related benefits including increased motivation, concentration and strength. INTERPRETATION: A home-based exercise program was associated with qualitative perceptions of improvements in overall health and HRQL by quarantined adolescents with JDM during COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons from this trial may help developing interventions focused on tackling physical inactivity in JDM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatomyositis/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Neurorehabil Neural Repair ; 36(1): 3-16, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488373

ABSTRACT

Background. The COVID-19 pandemic attributable to the severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS-CoV-2) has had a significant and continuing impact across all areas of healthcare including stroke. Individuals post-stroke are at high risk for infection, disease severity, and mortality after COVID-19 infection. Exercise stroke rehabilitation programs remain critical for individuals recovering from stroke to mitigate risk factors and morbidity associated with the potential long-term consequences of COVID-19. There is currently no exercise rehabilitation guidance for people post-stroke with a history of COVID-19 infection. Purpose. To (1) review the multi-system pathophysiology of COVID-19 related to stroke and exercise; (2) discuss the multi-system benefits of exercise for individuals post-stroke with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection; and (3) provide clinical considerations related to COVID-19 for exercise during stroke rehabilitation. This article is intended for healthcare professionals involved in the implementation of exercise rehabilitation for individuals post-stroke who have suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection and non-infected individuals who want to receive safe exercise rehabilitation. Results. Our clinical considerations integrate pre-COVID-19 stroke (n = 2) and COVID-19 exercise guidelines for non-stroke populations (athletic [n = 6], pulmonary [n = 1], cardiac [n = 2]), COVID-19 pathophysiology literature, considerations of stroke rehabilitation practices, and exercise physiology principles. A clinical decision-making tool for COVID-19 screening and eligibility for stroke exercise rehabilitation is provided, along with key subjective and physiological measures to guide exercise prescription. Conclusion. We propose that this framework promotes safe exercise programming within stroke rehabilitation for COVID-19 and future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Clinical Decision-Making , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/physiopathology
12.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(12): 1148-1151, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447684

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this observational study was to report the experience of a 1-yr home training with functional electrical stimulation cycling of a person with T4 American Impairment Scale A paraplegia for 9 yrs, homebound due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The 40-yr-old participant had a three-phase training: V1, isometric stimulation; V2, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 3 sessions/wk; and V3, functional electrical stimulation cycling for 2-4 sessions/wk. Data on general and physical tolerance, health impact, and performance were collected. Borg Scale score relating to fatigue was 10.1 before training and 11.8 after training. The average score for satisfaction at the end of sessions was 8.7. Lean leg mass increased more than 29%, although total bone mineral density dropped by 1.6%. The ventilatory thresholds increased from 19.5 to 29% and the maximum ventilatory peak increased by 9.5%. Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale score returned to its highest level by the end of training. For the only track event on a competition bike, the pilot covered a distance of 1607.8 m in 17 mins 49 secs. When functional electrical stimulation cycling training is based on a clear and structured protocol, it offers the person with paraplegia the opportunity to practice this activity recreationally and athletically. In times of crisis, this training has proven to be very relevant.


Subject(s)
Bicycling/physiology , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Paraplegia/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Paraplegia/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Case Studies as Topic , Treatment Outcome
13.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(12): 2167-2175, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439719

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to detect patients' characteristics who suffered severe and critical COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation clinic in Ankara City Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital and to share our experiences and outcomes of rehabilitation programmes applied. This study was designed as a single-centre, retrospective, observational study. Severe and critical COVID-19 patients, admitted to the post-acute COVID-19 rehabilitation clinic, were included in patient-based rehabilitation programmes, targeting neuromuscular and respiratory recovery. Functional status, oxygen (O2) requirement and daily living activities were assessed before and after rehabilitation. Eighty-five patients, of which 74% were male, were analysed, with the mean age of 58.27 ± 11.13 and mean body mass index of 25.29 ± 4.81 kg/m2. The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (49.4%) and diabetes mellitus (34.1%). Of the 85 patients, 84 received antiviral drugs, 81 low-molecular-weight heparin, 71 corticosteroids, 11 anakinra, 4 tocilizumab, 16 intravenous immunoglobulin and 6 plasmapheresis. 78.8% of the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, with a mean length of stay of 19.41 ± 18.99 days, while those who needed O2 support with mechanic ventilation was 36.1%. Neurological complications, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, critical illness-related myopathy/neuropathy, cerebrovascular disease and steroid myopathy, were observed in 39 patients. On initial functional statuses, 55.3% were bedridden, 22.4% in wheelchair level and 20% mobilised with O2 support. After rehabilitation, these ratios were 2.4%, 4.7% and 8.2%, respectively. During admission, 71 (83.5%) patients required O2 support, but decreased to 7 (8.2%) post-rehabilitation. Barthel Index improved statistically from 44.82 ± 27.31 to 88.47 ± 17.56. Patient-based modulated rehabilitation programmes are highly effective in severe and critical COVID-19 complications, providing satisfactory well-being in daily living activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Rehabilitation Centers/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rehabilitation Centers/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology
14.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 41(2): 88-92, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406511

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged how and whether patients with heart disease are able to safely access center-based exercise training and cardiac rehabilitation (CR). This commentary provides an experience-based overview of how one health system quickly developed and applied inclusive policies to allow patients to have safe and effective access to exercise-based CR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Heart Failure/rehabilitation , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Comorbidity , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 46(1): 95-99, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of exercise training through telerehabilitation applied during COVID-19 isolation period on overweight and obese individuals on physical fitness and quality of life. SUBJECTS/METHODS: In our study, 41 participants between the ages of 18-65 years and whose BMI values were 25 kg/m2 and above were randomly divided into two groups as telerehabilitation group (n: 21) and control group (n: 20). Exercise training applied to the telerehabilitation group with remote live connection included warm-up exercises, trunk stabilization exercises and breathing exercises under the supervision of a physiotherapist for 6 weeks, 3 days in a week. The control group was only informed about the importance of exercise for one session and evaluated at baseline and after 6 weeks. The physical fitness levels of individuals was assessed by Senior Fitness Test protocol and quality of life by Short Form-36. RESULTS: As a result of the study, statistically significant improvements were obtained in all parameters of physical fitness, quality of life in the telerehabilitation group (p < 0.05). In the difference values of the two groups, all parameters of physical fitness and quality of life were observed that there were statistically significant differences in favor of telerehabilitation group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: As a result, it was found that exercise training applied through telerehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic process was an effective, safe and viable approach in overweight and obese individuals. In the future, studies investigating the long-term effectiveness of telerehabilitation in this population are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Obesity/rehabilitation , Overweight/rehabilitation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Body Mass Index , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Physical Fitness , Quality of Life , Social Isolation
16.
JBI Evid Implement ; 19(3): 245-256, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398206

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) enhances muscle strength and coordination, and prevents urinary incontinence associated with giving birth. The goal was to improve women's PFMT during pregnancy and postpartum in La Rioja, Spain. METHODS: This evidence implementation project used the JBI evidence implementation framework. First, we conducted the PFMT baseline audit: to assess the criteria for midwife training, we sent a questionnaire to all midwives. To measure the criteria for PFMT and urinary incontinence risk assessment, we reviewed the medical records of 60 women selected through consecutive sampling and 15 other women at risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs) for the inclusion criteria in a PFMT program. Second, we used the Getting Research into Practice guidelines to identify barriers to the fulfillment of each criterion and design and implement strategies to improve compliance. Finally, we repeated the audit to measure compliance and verify the changes. RESULTS: The midwives received updated PFMT, optimizing compliance with the first criterion from 67 to 100%. The remaining criteria -- providing PFMT for pregnant women, identifying women at high risk of incontinence, and facilitating a supervised PFMT program for women at high risk of UTIs -- went from 0% compliance to 17, 96, and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSION: This project was effective in building consensus, improving midwives' practice, and facilitating mothers' PFMT. The project continued during the novel coronavirus [coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)] epidemic in Spain as the midwives, women, and managers were involved in the change because of a well designed registration system and the use of online tools for communication between midwives and women.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy/methods , Pelvic Floor/physiology , Postnatal Care/methods , Prenatal Care/methods , Urinary Incontinence/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Inservice Training , Midwifery , Pregnancy , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Urinary Tract Infections
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(32): e26898, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358519

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the anxiety and depression of patients with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who participated in Baduanjin exercise.From February 20, 2020 to March 7, 2020, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD) were used to investigate the anxiety and depression levels of patients with COVID-19 who participated in Baduanjin exercise. Ninety one questionnaires were received, including 40 males and 51 females. Stepwise regression analysis was used to analyze the effects of related factors on anxiety and depression levels.In Square cabin hospital, 91% of patients participated in Baduanjin exercise had no obvious anxiety and 82% had no obvious depression. The scores of anxiety and depression of female patients were significantly higher than that of male patients. Bachelor degree or above with low scores for anxiety and depression. The frequency of Baduanjin exercise was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression score.The development of Baduanjin exercise has a certain positive influence on the COVID-19 patients in the Square cabin hospital, which is conducive to alleviate anxiety and depression symptoms of the patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Depression/therapy , Exercise Therapy/standards , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Exercise Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Psychometrics/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 20(8): 395-401, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346321

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This review supports that physical activity improves immunosurveillance and has the potential to counter COVID-19 infection and symptomatology at three prevention levels. At the primary prevention level, several lines of evidence support that physical activity is an immune system adjuvant in combating infectious diseases. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that regular physical activity is associated with a reduced risk for COVID-19, similar to what has been reported for other respiratory infections. Although specific COVID-19-related studies are needed, data from investigations with other types of infectious agents, such as influenza, support the potential role of physical activity in augmenting COVID-19 vaccine efficacy (secondary prevention level). There is a growing awareness that COVID-19 can cause sustained morbidity in some patients, and physical training and rehabilitation (tertiary prevention level) can be directed toward improvement in physical fitness, quality of life, and immune health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise Therapy/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 20(5): 271-276, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322966

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the spring of 2020, we faced a global pandemic that resulted in social distancing limitations not previously experienced, forcing practitioners to adapt exercise programming to a virtual model. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effectiveness of a virtual exercise oncology program in 491 participants undergoing antineoplastic therapy between March and June 2020. Each session was completed virtually with a certified exercise oncology trainer. Fitness and psychological parameters were measured preexercise and postexercise intervention. Overall, participants completed 4949 of 5892 prescribed exercise sessions. Patients saw increases in cardiovascular endurance (15.2%, P < 0.05), muscular endurance (18.2%, P < 0.05), flexibility (31.9%, P < 0.05), feelings of support (58.7%, P < 0.05), and quality of life (32.2%, P < 0.05), as well as decreases in loneliness (54%, P < 0.05) and fatigue (48.7%, P < 0.05). In light of our findings, we assert that virtual exercise training is a viable option in circumstances where in-person, individualized exercise training is not possible.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Exercise Therapy/methods , Internet-Based Intervention , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Checklist , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Physical Endurance/physiology , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Social Support , Symptom Assessment , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 382, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This randomized controlled study compared standard supervised physiotherapy (SPT) with a self-developed, home-based, enhanced knee flexion exercise program involving a low stool (KFEH) in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Patients were recruited from July 2014 to December 2015 and randomly assigned to one of two groups: KFEH (n = 60) and SPT (n = 59). Outcomes (joint function) were evaluated according to the Knee Society Score (KSS), visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and range of motion (ROM) assessment at selected time points (preoperatively; 1 week; 1, 3, and 6 months; and 1 year after surgery). RESULTS: Pain and functional improvement were observed in both groups. Non-inferiority of KFEH was evident 12 months postoperatively; however, patients in the KFEH group exhibited better ROM at 1 month (P < 0.01). Absolute WOMAC and KSS scores were slightly better in the KFEH group, although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in VAS scores and complication rates between the two groups. Additionally, the home program would save patient time and decrease the economic burden associated with in-hospital SPT. CONCLUSION: Considering rehabilitation and economic efficiency as well as the COVID pandemic, a home-based enhanced knee flexion exercise program for TKA rehabilitation is recommended.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Exercise Therapy/methods , Osteoarthritis, Knee/rehabilitation , Physical Therapy Modalities , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobility Limitation , Osteoarthritis, Knee/physiopathology , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Safety , Treatment Outcome
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