Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 997
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
J Glob Health ; 11: 05029, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614230

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted movement restrictions in countries worldwide, impacting on physical activity (PA), a major non-communicable disease risk factor, and thus may have unintentional long-term health implications. In semi-rural areas of low-middle-income-countries (LMICs), where occupational activity is the main source of PA, changes in PA associated with COVID-19 restrictions are unknown. We investigated the impact of Movement Control Order (MCO) restrictions in a semi-rural region of Malaysia. Methods: The South East Asia Community Observatory (SEACO) is a dynamic prospective community cohort. We contacted a random sample of 1007 adults (18+) who had previously provided PA data in 2018. We asked about PA during the MCO (March-May 2020) and at the time of interview (June 2020). Results: During the MCO, PA reduced by a mean of 6.7 hours/week (95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.3, 8.0) compared to 2018, with the largest reductions among those in employment. By June, PA was 3.4 hours/week (95% CI = 2.0, 4.8) less than 2018, leaving 34% of adults currently inactive (20% in 2018). Reductions in occupational PA were not replaced with active travel or activity at home. Despite these observed reductions, most participants did not think the MCO had affected their PA. Conclusions: Movement restrictions are associated with lower PA lasting beyond the period of strict restrictions; such longer-term reductions in PA may have a detrimental impact on health. Future MCOs should encourage people to be active, but may additionally need targeted messaging for those who don't necessarily realise they are at risk. In particular, policies developed in more affluent countries may not easily translate to LMICs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Exercise , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Malaysia , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613816

ABSTRACT

Governments worldwide have imposed harsh restrictions for decreasing the Covid-19 pandemic and maintaining public health. Yet such limitations have impacted people's physical activity. This study examined relationships between changes in physical activity and resilience, emotions, and depression during two lockdowns in Israel. An online survey was completed twice by 135 participants during two consecutive lockdowns. The results indicate that resilience and positive emotions were higher, and negative emotions and depression were lower during the second lockdown compared to the first one-even though people spent less time performing physical activity in the later lockdown. Moreover, negative emotions significantly decreased among people who reported increased physical activity during the second lockdown [M = 2.2 (SD = 0.9) compared to M = 1.9 (SD = 0.8) on a scale of 1-5] and increased among those who reported a reduction in activity [M = 1.8 (SD = 0.7) compared to M = 2.2 (SD = 0.7)]. It could therefore be concluded that while the Israeli population's resilience is higher compared to other populations (who do not regularly deal with crisis situations), their increased physical activity was associated with better resilience and emotions and lower depression scores. Since lockdowns are an extreme yet often repeated phenomenon, it is important to understand the psychological implications of engaging in physical activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Emotions , Exercise , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7847-7857, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603341

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Islamic Republic of Iran has displayed one of the highest rates of COVID-19 infection in the world and the highest rate of mortality in the Middle East. Iran has used a stringent package of preventive health measures to mitigate the spread of infection, which however has negatively affected individuals' physical and psychological health. This study aimed at examining whether physical-activity (PA) behavior, anxiety, well-being, and sleep-quality changed in response to the COVID-19-related public health restrictions enforced in Iran. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An online questionnaire was disseminated to adults residing in Iran from November 17, 2020, to February 13, 2021 (~88 days), during Iran's strictest public health restrictions. Main outcome measures included Godin-Shephard Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire, General Anxiety Disorder-7, Mental Health Continuum-Short Form, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. RESULTS: A total of 3,323 adults (mean age 30±11 years, 54.3% female) participated in the survey. Firstly, the restrictions generally reduced PA behavior: (a) among inactive participants (IPs), 60.6% became less active vs. 5.1% who became more active; and (b) among active participants (APs), 49.9% became less active vs. 22.8% who became more active. Secondly, PA behavior was associated with higher well-being and sleep quality during the restrictions: (a) APs reported higher (or lower) levels of well-being and sleep quality (or anxiety) than did IPs; and (b) among IPs as well as among APs, the more active the participants, the greater (or lower) the levels of well-being and sleep quality (or anxiety). CONCLUSIONS: This study showed the beneficial role of PA behavior for well-being, anxiety, and sleep quality during the COVID-19 restrictions, whereas such restrictions appeared to decrease PA participation. Active lifestyle should be then encouraged during the COVID-19 outbreak while taking precautions.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593103

ABSTRACT

Exoskeletons and exosuits (exos) are wearable devices that physically assist movement. User comfort is critically important for societal adoption of exos. Thermal comfort (a person's satisfaction with their thermal environment) represents a key design challenge. Exos must physically attach/interface to the body to apply forces, and these interfaces inevitably trap some heat. It is envisioned that thermal comfort could be improved by designing mode-switching exo interfaces that temporarily loosen around a body segment when assistive forces are not being applied. To inform exo design, a case series study (N = 4) based on single-subject design principles was performed. Our objective was to assess individual responses to skin temperature and thermal comfort during physical activity with a Loose leg-sleeve interface compared with a Form-Fitting one, and immediately after a Form-Fitting sleeve switched to Loose. Skin under the Loose sleeve was 2-3 °C (4-6 °F) cooler after 25 min of physical activity, and two of four participants reported the Loose sleeve improved their thermal comfort. After completion of the physical activity, the Form-Fitting sleeve was loosened, causing a 2-4 °C (3-8 °F) drop in skin temperature underneath for all participants, and two participants to report slightly improved thermal comfort. These findings confirmed that an exo that can quickly loosen its interface when assistance is not required-and re-tighten when it is- has the potential to enhance thermal comfort for some individuals and environments. More broadly, this study demonstrates that mode-switching mechanisms in exos can do more than adjust physical assistance: they can also exploit thermodynamics and facilitate thermoregulation in a way that enhances comfort for exo users.


Subject(s)
Exoskeleton Device , Body Temperature Regulation , Exercise , Hot Temperature , Humans , Skin Temperature
6.
Front Public Health ; 9: 720589, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593019

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Motor Performance (MP) in children is an important resource for their future active lifestyle and health. Monitoring of MP is crucial to derive information of trends and to implement specific programs on the base of current MP levels. A variety of MP assessment tools exist, making it difficult to determine a "gold-standard" for assessment and to compare the findings. In Germany, the German Motor Test 6-18 (GMT 6-18) and Kinderturntest Plus 3-10 (KITT+ 3-10) are widely used MP assessment tools. The aim of this paper is to show which key questions can be answered within the context of a best practice example of a MP assessment tool and what can be derived from this for a practical application (the Fitness Barometer). Methods: The raw data of the Fitness Barometer was collected with the MP assessment tools GMT 6-18 and KITT+ 3-10 from 2012 through 2020. Data was pooled anonymously with the e-Research infrastructure MO|REdata and categorized into percentiles for MP and BMI. Overall, we included data of 23,864 children for the statistical analyses. T-tests for independent samples, percentage frequency analysis, descriptive statistics (chi- square-test) and single analysis of variance were conducted. Results and Discussion: Children tested reached a mean value of 57.03 (SD = 18.85). Of the sample, 12.7% children were overweight or obese and there is a significant difference between age groups [ χ ( 4 ) 2 = 178.62, p < 0.001, Cramer V = 0.09; n = 23.656]. The relationship between BMI category and mean value of MP was significant [F (4,19,523) = 224.81, p < 0.001]. During 2020, the year of the COVID-19 pandemic, mean value of endurance and speed decreased [Welch's F (1,573) = 8.08, p = 0.005; Welch's F (1,610) = 35.92, p < 0.001]. The GMT 6-18 and KITT+ 3-10 are valid, objective, reliable, and economic MP assessment tools for monitoring MP levels and derive added practical value. Specific programs and interventions should focus on the findings of these. The Fitness Barometer is a best practice example how a standardized assessment tool of monitoring MP point to trends on which practical evidence-based suggestions can be derived with many various partners and expertise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Exercise , Humans , Overweight , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(24)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592135

ABSTRACT

Regular physical exercise is essential for overall health; however, it is also crucial to mitigate the probability of injuries due to incorrect exercise executions. Existing health or fitness applications often neglect accurate full-body motion recognition and focus on a single body part. Furthermore, they often detect only specific errors or provide feedback first after the execution. This lack raises the necessity for the automated detection of full-body execution errors in real-time to assist users in correcting motor skills. To address this challenge, we propose a method for movement assessment using a full-body haptic motion capture suit. We train probabilistic movement models using the data of 10 inertial sensors to detect exercise execution errors. Additionally, we provide haptic feedback, employing transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation immediately, as soon as an error occurs, to correct the movements. The results based on a dataset collected from 15 subjects show that our approach can detect severe movement execution errors directly during the workout and provide haptic feedback at respective body locations. These results suggest that a haptic full-body motion capture suit, such as the Teslasuit, is promising for movement assessment and can give appropriate haptic feedback to the users so that they can improve their movements.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Movement , Feedback , Humans , Motion , Motor Skills
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599612

ABSTRACT

Parents of children with ASD experience a higher incidence of mental health difficulties, including stress, depression, and anxiety, than parents of children without ASD. According to studies related to ASD, parent-child physical activity programs are an effective approach to encourage both parents and their children with ASD to exercise together, thus improving the mental health of parents due to this interactive family activity. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of this web-based parent-child physical activity program on the mental health of parents of children with ASD. A total of 94 parent-child pairs consented to participate in this study, and 75 parent-child pairs completed the study. Three instruments-DASS-21, PSI-4-SF, and WHOQOL-26-were used to measure mental health, parental stress, and quality of life, respectively. A randomized controlled trial design was implemented to examine the effectiveness of the 10-week web-based parent-child physical activity program on improving the mental health of parents of children with ASD. The results showed that after the 10-week parent-child physical activity program, there were significant differences in overall DASS-21 and PSI-4-SF for the experimental group, compared with control group (p < 0.05), which indicated that the parent-child physical activity program has a positive influence on mental health in parents of children with ASD. One sub-area of WHOQOL-26 between the experimental and control groups across pre-/post-testing intervals also showed greater reductions in the item of psychological health (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the findings demonstrated the efficacy of the web-based parent-child physical activity program for improving mental health in parents of children with ASD.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Mental Health , Exercise , Humans , Internet , Parent-Child Relations , Quality of Life
10.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e935496, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The COVID-19 pandemic can affect the elderly population's general health. This study aimed to compare the effects of a remote home-based exercise program to improve the mental state, balance, and physical function and to prevent falls in adults aged 65 years and older during the COVID-19 pandemic in Seoul, Korea. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group of 35 participants who underwent a remote home-based fall prevention exercise program and a control group of 35 participants. The experimental group performed an exercise program twice weekly for 8 weeks from June 2 to July 21, 2021. The Geriatric Depression Scale, 5 times sit to stand test, grip strength, 10-m walk test, gait analysis, Timed Up and Go test, and static balance test were assessed before and after the 8-week program. RESULTS The group-by-time interaction effect was statistically significant for the Geriatric Depression Scale, five times sit to stand test, grip strength, 10-meter walk, gait speed, step length, stride length, Timed Up and Go test, and static balance test (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the experimental group showed a significant effect in all dependent variables except dynamic balance (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS In this population, the remote home-based fall prevention exercise program resulted in a significant improvement in physical function, psychological factors, and balance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings may have implications for community public health measures to protect the vulnerable during future epidemics and pandemics of infectious disease.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Hand Strength , Health Services for the Aged , Humans , Male , Postural Balance , Seoul/epidemiology , Walking Speed
11.
Rev Port Cardiol (Engl Ed) ; 40(12): 965-967, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598996

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Masks , Exercise , Humans
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There have been significant advances in the medical treatment and management of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, relapse and disease progression over the past 30 years. There have been advancements in the symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis, including management of secondary multiple sclerosis expressions such as walking, cognitive dysfunction, fatigue and depression. Scientific evidence and expert opinion suggest that exercise may be the single most effective non-pharmacological symptomatic treatment for multiple sclerosis. This article presents the historical context of exercise training within the multidisciplinary management of multiple sclerosis. We guide neurologists and healthcare providers on the recommended prescription of exercise and practical, theoretical methods to overcome barriers to exercise. METHOD: We undertook a critical search of the historical and current literature regarding exercise and multiple sclerosis from the viewpoint of exercise promotion by neurologists and the multidisciplinary care team. RESULTS: We highlight the ever-strengthening body of research indicating that exercise is safe and effective for improving symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Further, exercise training may be necessary for reducing disease progression. CONCLUSION: We seek to encourage neurologists and specialists in multidisciplinary healthcare teams to prescribe and promote exercise at diagnosis and across all stages of the disease trajectory using prescriptive guidelines as part of comprehensive MS care. Available tools include clinical education to dispel any historical myths related to exercise in multiple sclerosis, clinical exercise guidelines and behaviour change theory to overcome patients barriers to exercise.


Subject(s)
Multiple Sclerosis , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Fatigue/therapy , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
13.
Rev Port Cardiol (Engl Ed) ; 40(12): 957-964, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586735

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, among the safety measures adopted, use of facemasks during exercise training sessions in cardiac rehabilitation programs raised concerns regarding possible detrimental effects on exercise capacity. Our study examined the cardiorespiratory impact of wearing two types of the most common facemasks during treadmill aerobic training. METHODS: Twelve healthy health professionals completed three trials of a symptom-limited Bruce treadmill protocol: Without a mask, with a surgical mask and with a respirator. Perceived exertion and dyspnea were evaluated with the Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion and the Borg Dyspnea Scale, respectively. Blood pressure, heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) were measured at each 3-minute stage. RESULTS: Using a surgical mask or a respirator resulted in a shorter duration of exercise testing. At peak capacity, using a respirator resulted in higher levels of dyspnea and perceived exertion compared to not wearing a facemask. A significant drop in SpO2 was present at the end of exercise testing only when using a respirator. There were no differences in either chronotropic or blood pressure responses between testing conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Professionals involved in cardiac rehabilitation should be aware of the cardiorespiratory impact of facemasks. Future studies should assess whether exposure to these conditions may impact on the overall results of contemporary cardiac rehabilitation programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Exercise , Humans , Masks , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580842

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to examine changes in physical activity in Korean society, after the outbreak of COVID-19. Method This study was conducted using the Korean Community Health Survey conducted in 2019 and 2020. Subjects that have been diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes were excluded; a total of 355,914 cases were involved for analysis. In terms of the analysis method, General Linear Model (GLM) was conducted to examine the changes in physical activities in 2019 and 2020 depending on the presence of a spouse, educational status, and economic activities. In addition, the GLM was adopted to divide the subjects by gender and age, and analyze their physical activity changes in 2019 and 2020 with spouse presence, educational status, and economic activities as adjusted variables. Result In terms of Koreans, those without a spouse, high educational attainment, and economically inactive were less engaged in physical activities. Differences were found in subjects regarding moderate-intensity physical activities after social distancing following the spread of COVID-19. Senior females without a spouse, both males and females with low educational attainment, economically inactive adult females, and economically active senior males showed a greater drop in physical activities. For walking hours, both adult males and females without a spouse, adult females with all educational attainment level excluding elementary and middle school graduates, and economically inactive adult males and females also showed a downward trend. Conclusion The study recommends that people develop a strategy to increase their post-outbreak physical activity, taking into account the sociodemographic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Disease Outbreaks , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580799

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has significantly limited social contacts, thus contributing to deepening isolation. Therefore, SARS-CoV-2 exerted on humanity not only a physical impact but also a psychological one, often increasing the feeling of stress. The long-term effects of such a state could include the management of depression, so our study aimed to analyze groups of medical students in different periods of the pandemic (at the beginning of the pandemic, after half a year of the pandemic, after one year of the pandemic) in order to assess the impact of this situation on coping with stress. The impact of the pandemic on the development of stress factors such as alcohol consumption and smoking was also studied. The level of physical activity in the context of coping with an uncertain situation was also assessed. The impact of the above-mentioned factors on the behavior of students, including the Mini-COPE questionnaire, AUDIT test, the Fagerström test and the IPAQ questionnaire was analyzed. It has been shown that as the pandemic and the lockdown progressed, patients consumed more often or larger amounts of alcohol, smoked more cigarettes, and levels of physical activity decreased. All these factors may have had some impact on the deterioration of coping with stress among the respondents, which would indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic significantly contributed to an increase in the sense of stress among the students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cigarette Smoking , Students, Medical , Adaptation, Psychological , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580742

ABSTRACT

Background: This proposal aims to explain some of the gaps in scientific knowledge on the natural history of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with a specific focus on immune, inflammatory, and metabolic markers, in parallel with temporal assessment of clinical and mental health in patients with COVID-19. The study will explore the temporal modulatory effects of physical activity and body composition on individual trajectories. This approach will provide a better understanding of the survival mechanisms provided by the immunomodulatory role of physical fitness. Methods: We will conduct a prospective observational cohort study including adult patients previously infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus who have expressed a mild to moderate COVID-19 infection. Procedures will be conducted for all participants at baseline, six weeks after vaccination, and again at 12 months. At each visit, a venous blood sample will be collected for immune phenotypic characterization and biochemistry assays (inflammatory and metabolic parameters). Also, body composition, physical activity level, cardiovascular and pulmonary function, peripheral and respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and mental health will be evaluated. Using the baseline information, participants will be grouped based on physical activity levels (sedentary versus active), body composition (normal weight versus overweight or obese), and SARS-CoV-2 status (positive versus negative). A sub-study will provide mechanistic evidence using an in-vitro assay based on well-trained individuals and age-matched sedentary controls who are negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Whole blood will be stimulated using recombinant human coronavirus to determine the cytokine profile. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy well-trained participants will be collected and treated with homologous serum (from the main study; samples collected before and after the vaccine) and recombinant coronavirus (inactive virus). The metabolism of PBMCs will be analyzed using Respirometry (Seahorse). Data will be analyzed using multilevel repeated-measures ANOVA. Conclusions: The data generated will help us answer three main questions: (1) Does the innate immune system of physically active individuals respond better to viral infections compared with that of sedentary people? (2) which functional and metabolic mechanisms explain the differences in responses in participants with different physical fitness levels? and (3) do these mechanisms have long-term positive modulatory effects on mental and cardiovascular health? Trial registration number: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-5dqvkv3. Registered on 21 September 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Exercise , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Observational Studies as Topic , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580716

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: we aimed to investigate the effects of physical activity on cognitive functions and deficits of healthy population and other needy groups. Secondly, we investigated the relation between healthy habits and psychopathological risks. Finally, we investigated the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on exercise addiction and possible associated disorders. (2) Methods: From April 2021 to October 2021, we conducted a review aimed at identifying the effects of physical exercise on mental health, from cognitive improvements to risk of addiction; we searched for relevant studies on PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINHAL. (3) Results: For the first purpose, results indicated multiple effects such as better precision and response speed in information processing tasks on healthy populations; improvement of executive functions, cognitive flexibility and school performance in children; improvement of attention and executive functions and less hyperactivity and impulsiveness on children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); improvement of executive and global functions on adults; improvement of overall cognitive functioning on patients with schizophrenic spectrum disorder or bipolar disorder. Data also demonstrated that exercise addiction seems to be related to low levels of education, low self-esteem, eating disorders and body dysmorphisms. Eventually, it was found that people with lower traits and intolerance of uncertainty show a strong association between COVID-19 anxiety and compulsive exercise and eating disorder. (4) Conclusions: these findings underline on one side the beneficial effects of physical activity on cognitive function in healthy individuals in a preventive and curative key, while on the other side the importance of an adequate evaluation of psychological distress and personality characteristics associated with exercise addiction.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , COVID-19 , Adult , Child , Cognition , Executive Function , Exercise , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580556

ABSTRACT

The introduction of lockdowns and other containment measures during the COVID-19 pandemic substantially altered people's lifestyle and dietary behavior. Several studies evaluated the short-term effects of these measures; yet reports on long-term consequences are scarce. We sought to address this gap in the literature by analyzing dietary and lifestyle data collected at an obesity center in Rome, Italy. The Italian region of Lazio was hit hard by the pandemic. To evaluate the potential health impacts, we compared the pre- and post-lockdown data of 118 individuals. Contrary to the common belief that lockdown had adverse effects solely on people's dietary habits, we observed a significantly increased consumption of raw vegetables, whole grains, and water in our study sample. Favorable effects, however, were also accompanied by adverse trends, such as a higher prevalence of sleeping difficulties. Our data emphasize that the lockdowns associated with the pandemic also influenced participants' social behavior, with less individuals reporting eating out or in company. Our study highlights the substantial impact of lockdowns on many dimensions of life. As such, it is of utmost importance in the critical evaluation of such stringent containment measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Life Style , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Rome/epidemiology
19.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): 3186, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580226

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Exercise , Humans
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576991

ABSTRACT

This study examined pre-pandemic (2017-early March 2020) to early-pandemic (Spring 2020) changes in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), light PA (LPA), and sedentary behavior/sleep (SS), by weekday/weekend, and age (preschool, elementary, middle school). We re-enrolled children from two pre-pandemic obesity prevention trials and examined differences in accelerometer-measured PA from pre-pandemic to early-pandemic across age groups using linear mixed models. Children (n = 75) were 51% multiple race/ethnicities, 29% preschool, 28% elementary, 43% middle school, 65% suburban, 21% rural, and 13% urban. Pre-pandemic to early-pandemic changes in weekday MVPA (p = 0.006), LPA (p = 0.018), and SS (p = 0.003) differed by age. On weekdays, middle schoolers' MVPA decreased 15.36 min/day (p = 0.002) and SS increased 94.36 min/day (p < 0.001) with non-significant changes among preschoolers and elementary schoolers. Compared to elementary schoolers, middle schoolers' changes in weekday MVPA (b = -16.34, p = 0.036) and SS (b = 63.28, p = 0.039) significantly differed. Declines in weekday MVPA and increases in SS among middle schoolers suggest that, compared with younger children, middle schoolers are dependent on school and recreational facilities for PA, and in their absence engage in more sedentary activities and sleep.


Subject(s)
Accelerometry , Pandemics , Child , Child, Preschool , Exercise , Humans , Policy , Sleep
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...