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1.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e31278, 2021 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has arguably facilitated a shift toward increased sedentariness and reduced physical activity. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that mental health has also declined during the pandemic. However, it remains unknown to what extent social distancing (SD) behaviors and mental health have affected the physical activity levels of the general population. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of SD behaviors and prevailing mental health on the odds of being physically active during the early COVID-19 pandemic response. METHODS: A total of 4819 adults (2474/4819, 51.3%, female) from the US population with a median age of 46 (IQR 35-59) completed an online survey during the early pandemic response (April-June 2020). The survey included questions on adherence to 11 SD behaviors, and validated questionnaires which assessed self-reported physical activity, depression, anxiety, and mental well-being. Respondents were categorized into 2 physical activity groups: inactive (0-599 metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-minutes/week) and active (≥600 MET-minutes/week). A logistic generalized additive model (GAM) was used to determine which SD factors and mental health outcomes were associated with physical activity level. RESULTS: The GAM analysis revealed that wearing a facemask in public (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.14-1.79; P=.003), limiting the use of public transport (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19-1.83; P=.001), and restricting travel outside the house (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.19-2.05; P=.002) were SD behaviors associated with higher odds of being more physically active. Conversely, avoiding physical activity outside the house was associated with higher odds of being inactive (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.46-0.63; P<.001). Leaving the house more frequently, and a higher mental well-being were associated with increasing odds of being physically active (P<.001). Engaging with a moderate number of SD behaviors (3-7 total) was positively associated with physical activity, whereas a very high SD vigilance (ie, engaging with ≥10 total behaviors) decreased the odds of being active during the early pandemic response. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings of our study, we suggest that future public health messaging of SD guidelines should include (1) a clear portrayal of the benefits of regular exercise on mental health; and (2) a specific focus on how to be physically active outdoors in a COVID-safe manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e26330, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 led to the COVID-19 pandemic starting in January 2020. The Swiss Federal Council prescribed a lockdown of nonessential businesses. Students and employees of higher education institutions had to install home offices and participate in online lectures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this survey study was to evaluate lifestyle habits, such as physical activity (PA), sitting time, nutritional habits (expressed as median modified Mediterranean Diet Score [mMDS]), alcohol consumption habits, and sleeping behavior during a 2-month period of confinement and social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey participants were students and employees of a Swiss university of applied sciences. METHODS: All students and employees from Bern University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Professions (ie, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, and physiotherapy divisions) were invited to complete an anonymous online survey during the COVID-19 confinement period. Information on the lifestyle dimensions of PA, sitting time, nutritional and alcohol consumption habits, and sleep behavior was gathered using adaptations of validated questionnaires. Frequency analyses and nonparametric statistical methods were used for data analysis. Significance was set at 5% α level of error. RESULTS: Prevalence of non-health-enhancing PA was 37.1%, with participants of the division of physiotherapy showing the lowest prevalence. Prevalence of long sitting time (>8 hours/day) was 36.1%. The median mMDS was 9, where the maximal score was 15, with participants of the division of nutrition and dietetics being more adherent to a Mediterranean diet as compared to the other groups. Prevalence of nonadherence to the Swiss alcohol consumption recommendations was 8.3%. Prevalence of low sleeping quality was 44.7%, while the median sleeping duration was 8 hours, which is considered healthy for adult populations. CONCLUSIONS: In the group analysis, differences in PA, sitting time, and mMDS were observed between different divisions of health professions as well as between Bachelor of Science students, Master of Science students, and employees. Therefore, public health messages regarding healthy lifestyle habits during home confinement should be more group specific. The results of this study may provide support for the implementation of group-specific health promotion interventions at universities in pandemic conditions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04502108; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04502108.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Feeding Behavior , Quarantine , Sleep , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities , Young Adult
3.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 853, 2022 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the health benefits of physical activity are well documented, most older adults are not sufficiently active. There is a need to explore approaches to physical activity promotion amongst older adults that meet the personal preferences and needs of participants, and that can be implemented on a large scale in community-based settings. The current study evaluates Daily Moves, a community-based physical activity program for older adults living in Adelaide, Australia.  METHODS: The Daily Moves program, which ran almost entirely during the COVID-19 pandemic, provided participants with personalized plans and information about suitable physical activity promoting activities available in their local area. This study used an explanatory sequential mixed-methods approach to evaluate associations between participation in the Daily Moves program and physical activity engagement, physical function and psychosocial wellbeing, and to explore the experiences of Daily Moves participants through qualitative interviews, with a particular focus on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on program participation and enjoyment. RESULTS: The research evaluation included 69 older adults (mean age at baseline = 73.9 ± 5.6 years; 19 male). Following Daily Moves, participants reported an increase in self-report physical activity levels (mean increase = 1.8 days, p < 0.001), improvements on several measures of physical function (left grip strength (mean increase = 1.8 kg, p < 0.001); right grip strength (mean increase = 1.3 kg, p = 0.03); Timed Up and Go (mean decrease = 1.3 s, p < 0.001)), and no significant changes in measures of psychosocial wellbeing. Qualitative interviews revealed that participants valued the supportive and flexible nature of Daily Moves, and that they felt connected with staff and other participants despite the onset of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation demonstrates that physical activity programs embedded within the community can provide flexible and tailored recommendations to participants, and that this approach can promote positive change in important indicators of health in older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Exercise/psychology , Emotions , Self Report , Program Evaluation
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110082

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several quantitative studies have found a decline in physical activity in response to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. The aim of the present study was to use large-scale free text survey data to qualitatively gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity, then map barriers and facilitators to the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, and Behaviour (COM-B) Model of Behaviour to aid future intervention development. METHODS: 17,082 participants provided a response to the free text module, and data from those who mentioned a physical activity related word in any context were included. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and key themes identified. RESULTS: 5396 participants provided 7490 quotes related to physical activity. The sample were predominately female (84%), white (British/Irish/Other) (97%) and aged <60 years (57%). Seven key themes were identified: the importance of outdoor space, changes in daily routine, COVID-19 restrictions prevented participation, perceived risks or threats to participation, the importance of physical health, the importance of physical activity for mental health and the use of technology. CONCLUSION: Future physical activity interventions could encourage people to walk outdoors, which is low cost, flexible, and accessible to many. Developing online resources to promote and support physical activity provides a flexible way to deliver quality content to a large audience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Exercise/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 49: 101688, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has been a great public health concern among breast cancer survivors (BCS), especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is closely related to a higher risk of cancer recurrence and mortality. The positive impacts of psychosocial beliefs in promoting physical activity (PA) have been well acknowledged. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the effects of psychosocial beliefs on PA in BCS to prevent physical inactivity. Furthermore, we examined the relationships between daily activities, trip behaviors, and associated subjective well-being. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive study design. Female BCS who were able to exercise regularly completed the battery of assessments in March 2021. Specifically, the international PA questionnaires and the adapted PA-related psychosocial beliefs questionnaires were used to assess BCS's PA and psychosocial beliefs, respectively. In addition, the smartphone-based Day Reconstruction Method was utilized to measure subjective well-being. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-squared test, analyses of variance, and correlation analysis. RESULTS: In the context of investigations during the COVID-19 pandemic, our study showed that 77.8% of BCS reported meeting PA guidelines. As the components of psychosocial beliefs, the change strategies, social support, and confidence were significantly associated with higher PA levels. Additionally, the protective effect of leisure/recreation activities among BCS on their emotional well-being was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study demonstrated the importance of understanding the relationship between BCS's psychosocial beliefs and PA during the pandemic. Notably, this study is unique because it used an application-based method to assess BCS' subjective well-being objectively.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Female , Humans , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Exercise/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065958

ABSTRACT

Physical exercise can benefit individuals' physical and mental health and also influence individuals' long-term behavioral choices. Doing exercise is particularly important given that physical exercise can impact individuals' cognitive abilities and positive emotional states, which may further impact entrepreneurial behavior. Therefore, understanding the relationship between exercise and entrepreneurial behavior is essential, because it can provide policy suggestions for popularizing athletic activities and boosting entrepreneurship. Consequently, the present study examined whether physical exercise could predict entrepreneurial behavior and the possible psychological mechanisms within this relationship. Based on the 2017 Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS2017), this study tested the hypotheses using the Probit and Tobit models. The results showed that individuals' physical exercise intensity and frequency positively affected their entrepreneurial behavior. In addition, five variables moderated the relationships between physical exercise and individual entrepreneurial behavior: urban-rural differences, education level, marital status, the existence of minor children, and age. Moreover, positive emotions and physical/mental health mediated the influence of physical exercise (exercise frequency and exercise intensity) on individual entrepreneurial behavior. Endogeneity explanations were ruled out by including instrumental variable, copula terms and adopting coarsened exact matching.


Subject(s)
Entrepreneurship , Exercise , Asians , Child , China , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Mental Health
7.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 860, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex symptom with numerous possible causes and influencing factors. Understanding how modifiable factors affect the course of CLBP is important for preventing progression. As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the lifestyle of many people, this study paper assessed whether it also changed the influence of modifiable lifestyle factors (regular exercise and sedentary behaviour) and mental health factors (anxiety and depression) on CLBP pain intensity and disability by comparing the strength of these associations before and during the pandemic. We hypothesised that the importance of regular physical activity and good mental health for CLBP patients would increase during the pandemic. METHODS: These questions were investigated in a cross-sectional study of insurance claims data and self-reported data from various questionnaires from 3,478 participants in a German CLBP health intervention (2014-2021) by calculating pre- and intra-pandemic odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each variable of interest and outcome. Potential confounders were also considered. Pandemic status was treated as an effect modifier. Based on the date of enrolment, participants were classified as "pre-pandemic" or "pandemic". RESULTS: Regularly exercising ≥ 4 h/week significantly reduced the odds of high disability for men (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.31 - 0.79, p = 0.003) and women (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.14 - 0.563, p = 0.002) and reduced the probability of severe pain in women (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.21 - 0.65, p < 0.001). Each one-point increase in PHQ-4 score for anxiety and depression increased the OR of high pain intensity by 1.25 points (95% CI 1.18 - 1.34, p < 0.001). A clear impact of COVID-19 lockdowns was observed. In individuals who exercised ≥ 4 h/week the OR of high disability was 0.57 (95% CI 0.36 - 0.92, p = 0.021) in the pre-pandemic group compared to 0.29 (95% CI 0.12 - 0.56, p = 0.002) in the pandemic group. The probability of high disability increased from an OR of 1.42 (95% CI 1.33 - 1.52, p < 0.001) per marginal increase in the PHQ-4 scale before the pandemic, to an OR of 1.73 (95% CI 1.58 - 1.89, p < 0.001) during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of association of the factors that influenced high pain intensity and disability increased during the pandemic. On the one hand, the protective effect of regular exercising was greater in participants surveyed during lockdown. On the other hand, a higher risk through anxiety or depression during the lockdown was identified. An additional study with objective measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity is needed to validate these results. More in-depth investigation of lockdown-induced associations between reduced daily physical activity, increased levels of anxiety and depression, and their effects on CLPB could also be worthwhile. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study used routinely collected data from a CLBP intervention that was previously evaluated and registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials under DRKS00015463 (04/09/2018). The original ethics approval, informed consent and self-reported questionnaire have remained unchanged and are still valid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low Back Pain , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/psychology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Low Back Pain/therapy , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior
8.
BMC Womens Health ; 22(1): 371, 2022 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing postpartum physical activity (PA), taking into consideration psychosocial perceptions during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic by comparing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores. METHODS: A web-based cross-sectional survey of 787 postpartum women was conducted between March and October 2021. After applying the exclusion criteria, 590 women were analyzed. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form, was used to assess the level and amount of PA. The Short Form-12 Health Survey version 2 (SF-12v2) was used to measure HRQoL. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine whether sociodemographic factors and psychosocial perceptions during the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with the level of PA. Based on the current national guidelines for exercise in Japan, respondents were classified by weekly PA level as an Inactive group and an Active group to assess the influence of PA on HRQoL. RESULTS: Mean total PA was 19.3 total metabolic equivalents hour/week, and the prevalence of an inactive lifestyle was 45.9% among respondents. Each year of age was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.92 (95% CI 0.87-0.97) for becoming physical inactivity during postpartum. Factors positively associated with more active levels were greater number of days for delivery (OR = 1.00; 95% CI 1.00-1.01), multiparity (OR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.00-2.23), having someone to talk about childcare and the individual's partner (OR = 2.04; 95% CI 0.96-4.36) and not having anxiety symptoms (OR = 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.97). The Active group had significantly higher HRQoL scores than the Inactive group in the following scales: physical component summary (p < 0.001), mental component summary (p = 0.041). CONCLUSIONS: The influential factors for postpartum PA level were younger age, longer duration after childbirth, multiparity and not having anxiety symptoms, which correlated positively with PA. The presence of someone with whom can talk to about childcare and partner issues was associated with the maintenance of higher PA among postpartum women, suggesting that factor as a positive influence on PA under unsettled conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postpartum Period , Quality of Life/psychology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010082

ABSTRACT

(1) Introduction: Mental health (MH) and physical activity (PA) share a bi-directional relationship, but most studies report MH as the outcome. With diminishing pandemic-related MH, this review examines the impact of diminished MH on PA. (2) Methods: This narrative literature review included 19 empirical studies published since the COVID-19 pandemic. Electronic databases such as MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched for English language articles in peer-reviewed journals using equivalent index terms: "anxiety", "depression", "stress", "mental health", "exercise", "activity", "COVID-19", "coronavirus", and "2019 pandemic". The search reviewed 187 articles with double-rater reliability using Covidence. A total of 19 articles met the inclusion criteria. (3) Results: MH themes that impacted PA were depression and/or anxiety (n = 17), one of which identified inadequate coping and excessive pandemic stress (n = 2). In addition, women are more likely to suffer diminished MH and reduced PA throughout the pandemic. (4) Conclusion: Current research suggests that individuals with pre-pandemic MH episodes are correlated with more effective coping skills and fewer adverse effects from COVID-19 than expected. As we emerge from this pandemic, equipping all individuals, especially women, with positive coping strategies may accelerate a seamless return to PA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results
10.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 24(10): 493-501, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007250

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper examines children's physical activity and sedentary behavior and associated psychological outcomes coincident with the COVID-19 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Generally, the research has found decreased physical activity and increased sedentary behavior, both of which are associated with various psychological outcomes. The research on sedentary behavior has focused on screen time with minimal consideration of other sedentary behaviors or of specific physical activities or the context in which these behaviors occurred. Changes in children's daily routines and activities have received little attention in the mass trauma research despite the fact that disasters disrupt individual, family, and community life. Thus, the current report contributes to an understanding of the breadth of mass trauma effects, underscores the importance of physical activity and sedentary behavior and their associations with health and psychological outcomes, and is a reminder to consider children's daily lives both during times of crisis and under usual circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Child , Child Behavior , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 08 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979238

ABSTRACT

During emerging adulthood (EA), higher education medical students undergo a higher risk of anxiety and depression compared to the general population. The aim of this comparative cross-sectional study was to compare the proportions of three mental disorders, namely anxiety, depression and somatisation in terms of their symptoms and self-reported physical activity (PA) levels across the cohorts of biomedical and non-biomedical female students as well as to assess the association between the mental health outcomes and PA use. Between September 2021 and January 2022, a total of 1231 female higher education students aged between 18 and 29 years old were recruited for the study. Severe symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as unexplained somatic complaints, were suffered by 51.9%, 11% and 23% of female students, respectively. Non-biomedical female students, compared to medicine and health sciences students, were more vulnerable due to the increased prevalence of negative mental health outcomes. The relationship between increased sports activity as a potential trigger for mental well-being and decreased severity of depressive symptoms was identified in the cohorts of both biomedical (adjusted odd ratio (ORadj) 0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-1.0) and non-biomedical (ORadj 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.9) female students. The current research highlights the importance of increasing sports activity by involving students in regular physical exercise of specific types for decreasing the severity of depressive symptoms in student-aged female populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Lithuania/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969210

ABSTRACT

Quantitative data show that physical activity (PA) reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic, with differential impacts across demographic groups. Qualitative research is limited; thus, this study aimed to understand barriers and facilitators to PA during the pandemic, focusing on groups more likely to have been affected by restrictions, and to map these onto the capability, opportunity, motivation model of behaviour (COM-B). One-to-one interviews were conducted with younger (aged 18-24) and older adults (aged 70+), those with long-term physical or mental health conditions, and parents of young children. Themes were identified using reflexive thematic analysis and were mapped onto COM-B domains. A total of 116 participants contributed (aged 18-93, 61% female, 71% White British). Key themes were the importance of the outdoor environment, impact of COVID-19 restrictions, fear of contracting COVID-19, and level of engagement with home exercise. Caring responsibilities and conflicting priorities were a barrier. PA as a method of socialising, establishing new routines, and the importance of PA for protecting mental health were motivators. Most themes mapped onto the physical opportunity (environmental factors) and reflective motivation (evaluations/plans) COM-B domains. Future interventions should target these domains during pandemics (e.g., adapting PA guidance depending on location and giving education on the health benefits of PA).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
14.
J Phys Act Health ; 19(7): 481-489, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962052

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the COVID-19 virus dramatically changed daily life and created many obstacles for adolescents to engage in physical activity (PA). This study tracked rates of self-reported PA and examined its impact on adjustment among adolescents during the first 14 months of the pandemic. Canadian adolescents (N = 1068, 14-18 y, meanage = 16.95 y) reported on their frequency of PA, context of activity, and adjustment across 4 time points (April 2020 to June 2021). In line with our hypothesis, higher average levels of vigorous PA across the pandemic predicted less anxiety and depression and higher self-esteem at our study's end. Vigorous PA also buffered the relationships COVID-19 stress had with anxiety and self-esteem. The results further support recommendations for PA throughout the pandemic and while dealing with lockdown situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Canada/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Emotional Adjustment , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e37699, 2022 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) during pregnancy is an effective and safe way to improve maternal health in uncomplicated pregnancies. However, compliance with PA recommendations remains low among pregnant women. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of offering structured supervised exercise training (EXE) or motivational counseling on PA (MOT) during pregnancy on moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) level. Additionally, complementary measures of PA using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) and gold standard doubly labeled water (DLW) technique were investigated. The hypotheses were that both EXE and MOT would increase MVPA in pregnancy compared with standard care (CON) and that EXE would be more effective than MOT. In addition, the association between MVPA and the number of sessions attended was explored. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial included 220 healthy, inactive pregnant women with a median gestational age of 12.9 (IQR 9.4-13.9) weeks. A total of 219 women were randomized to CON (45/219), EXE (87/219), or MOT (87/219). The primary outcome was MVPA (minutes per week) from randomization to the 29th gestational week obtained by a wrist-worn commercial activity tracker (Vivosport, Garmin International). PA was measured by the activity tracker throughout pregnancy, PPAQ, and DLW. The primary outcome analysis was performed as an analysis of covariance model adjusting for baseline PA. RESULTS: The average MVPA (minutes per week) from randomization to the 29th gestational week was 33 (95% CI 18 to 47) in CON, 50 (95% CI 39 to 60) in EXE, and 40 (95% CI 30 to 51) in MOT. When adjusted for baseline MVPA, participants in EXE performed 20 (95% CI 4 to 36) minutes per week more MVPA than participants in CON (P=.02). MOT was not more effective than CON; EXE and MOT also did not differ. MVPA was positively associated with the number of exercise sessions attended in EXE from randomization to delivery (P=.04). Attendance was higher for online (due to COVID-19 restrictions) compared with physical exercise training (P=.03). Adverse events and serious adverse events did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Offering EXE was more effective than CON to increase MVPA among pregnant women, whereas offering MOT was not. MVPA in the intervention groups did not reach the recommended level in pregnancy. Changing the intervention to online due to COVID-19 restrictions did not affect MVPA level but increased exercise participation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03679130; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03679130. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1136/bmjopen-2020-043671.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/prevention & control , Counseling , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1400, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic restrictions curtailed physical activity. The current study applied an integrated Theory of Planned Behavior to identify the determinants of physical activity behavior and the processes involved in the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shiraz city, Southern Iran, among 2500 people who met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Data were collected using the demographic information questions and questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs. The Questionnaire via WhatsApp, emails, and SMS was shared. Data analysis was performed using SPSS26 and Amos version 24. Mean and standard deviation was used to describe the data. Also, one-way ANOVA and structural equation analysis were used to analyze the data. The significance level in all the tests was considered to be 0.05. RESULTS: One thousand one hundred sixty-nine samples (46.8%) said they had been exercising less than 3 days a week, and 47.6% of them did not have any exercise or physical activities (n = 1191). The mean score of attitudes, SN, PBC, and intention were 9.38 ± 2.07, 9.27 ± 2.03, 9.32 ± 2.05, and 12.29 ± 2.35, respectively. The effect size values demonstrate the independent variables' high coefficient of influence on explaining the theoretical model. According to the results, the factors play an important role in samples' intention (η2 ≥ 0.2, p ≤ 0.05). The effect size of intention on doing physical activities and exercise during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is Eta square = 0.777, which means the measure was high. The obtained model was good based on the main goodness of fit indices (Chi2 = 108.6, df = 25, n = 2500, Chi2/df = 4.344, RMSEA = 0.036, AGFI = 0.92, CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.90, Fornell-Larcker criterion = 0.87, HTMT = 0.89). CONCLUSION: The TPB provides a useful framework to explore psychosocial determinants of physical activity behavior during the pandemic and identify key strategies for program planning aimed at improving exercise among people who were already influenced by quarantine and lockdown restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Intention , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934022

ABSTRACT

Telehealth holds much potential for supporting older adults' physical and social health. In particular, telewellness interventions to support the physical and social wellness of older adults are needed to overcome participation barriers with in-person programs. This paper presents guidelines for delivering telewellness interventions to older adults, which were informed by a human factors approach to developing a Tele Tai Chi intervention for older adults with mobility disabilities, including reviewing user needs literature and conducting user-centered needs assessment research. From these findings, we developed a protocol and support materials for delivering a telewellness intervention and conducted a feasibility study. We also established an adaptation committee to provide recommendations on the intervention. The outcome of our human factors approach was the establishment of research-driven design guidelines for delivering group exercise programs to older adults using videoconferencing. The guidelines provide direction for designing a telewellness protocol, supporting remote participation, and promoting socialization and engagement. These guidelines can be used to deliver interventions that increase access to socially-engaging, physical activity programs for older adults, which can ultimately help support their physical health, mental health, and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Videoconferencing , Aged , Exercise/psychology , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Physical Therapy Modalities
18.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604528, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933939

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate if change in physical activity during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic predicted severity of anxiety and depression symptoms 6 months later in physically active adults. Methods: A total of 855 respondents (32.6% women) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at two time points and reported change in physical activity habits in the first 3 months of the COVID-19 lockdown in Norway. Results: Women had higher prevalence rates than men for both anxiety and depression symptoms in the Unchanged, Increased and Decreased physical activity (PA) subgroups. Women and men who reported Increased PA at baseline were associated with increased risk for anxiety symptoms at time 2. Increased PA was associated with higher risk for depression at time 2 for women, but not for men. Conclusion: The results indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with deterioration in mental health also for physically active adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903357

ABSTRACT

Aerobic exercise improves executive function-which tends to decline with age-and dual-task training with aerobic exercise improves the global cognitive function. However, home-based older adults could not follow these programs due to social isolation during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Therefore, we conducted a single-blind randomized controlled trial with 88 healthy older adults without dementia or sarcopenia who were randomly assigned into the Nordic walking (aerobic exercise), dance (dual-task training with aerobic exercise), or control group. The participants in both exercise intervention groups trained for 30 min, three times per week, for 4 weeks. All groups consumed amino acid-containing foods three times per week. We found that both exercise intervention groups showed improvements in executive function, while the dance group showed additional improvement in global cognitive function. The dance group showed a higher maximum gait speed, greater improvement in imitation ability, and improved executive function and cognitive function than the Nordic walking group. The intervention programs did not significantly affect the muscle mass or muscle output than the control group; however, both programs improved the participant neurological functions such as the heel lift, with dance training being the most effective intervention. In conclusion, dance training effectively improves cognitive function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cognition/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Japan , Pilot Projects , Single-Blind Method
20.
Cancer Causes Control ; 33(7): 939-950, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844405

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: There is limited information on how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed health behaviors among cancer patients. We examined changes in exercise behaviors since the pandemic and identified characteristics associated with these changes among cancer patients. METHODS: Cancer patients (n = 1,210) completed a survey from August to September 2020 to assess COVID-19 pandemic-related changes in health behaviors and psychosocial factors. Patients were categorized into three groups: exercising less, exercising did not change, and exercising more. Patient characteristics were compared by exercise groups. RESULTS: One-third of the patients reported a decreased amount of regular exercise, while 10% reported exercising more during the pandemic. Patients who exercised less were more likely to be unemployed/retired and have poor health status and psychosocial stressors such as disruptions in daily life while less likely to be former smokers (all p < 0.05). In contrast, patients who exercised more were younger, had stage IV diagnosis, and also reported disruptions in daily life (all p < 0.05). Patients who were living in rural areas were also more likely not to experience changes in exercise habits (all p < 0.05), although rural-urban status was not identified as a strong predictor. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of cancer patients experienced changes in exercise habits, especially exercising less, during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Age, employment status, tumor stage, health status, smoking status, and psychosocial factors were associated with changes in exercise behaviors. Our results highlight the importance of promoting physical activity guidelines for cancer survivorship during the COVID-19 pandemic and may help improve the identification of cancer patients susceptible to exercising less.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Health Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , Smoking/psychology
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