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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24510, 2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595341

ABSTRACT

Due to its suddenness and unpredictability, COVID-19 caused strife and effects on public mental health, resulting in a surge of negative emotions. The study explores the relationship between physical exercise and negative emotions in home-based college students during the COVID-19 epidemic, as well as the mediating role of resilience, thus providing a new basis for understanding the role of physical exercise in improving negative emotions in college students; A total of 1214 college students were investigated with the Physical Exercise Questionnaire, Negative Emotion Scale and Resilience Scale; Both physical exercise and resilience were significantly negatively correlated with negative emotions in college students (r = - 0.25, - 0.33, P < 0.001), and there was a significant positive correlation between physical exercise and resilience (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Physical exercise had a direct effect on the negative emotions of college students (ß = - 0.14, P < 0.001). Resilience had a partial mediating effect between physical exercise and the negative emotions of the college students, with a mediating effect value of 0.14 and a mediating effect contribution rate of 50.00%; The study found that physical exercise not only directly affected the negative emotions of college students but also improved their resilience by slowing down their negative emotions and promoting their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 17(1): 51, 2020 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding how to create and deliver effective physical activity (PA) messages for and to various population subgroups may play a role in increasing population PA levels. This scoping review aimed to provide an overview of what is known about PA messaging and highlight key research gaps. METHODS: We followed a 5-stage protocol proposed by Arksey & O'Malley and the Preferred Reporting Items For Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) extension for scoping reviews checklist. Stage 1: research questions were identified. Stage 2: we identified relevant studies by searching electronic databases, contacting existing networks and hand searching reference lists. Stage 3: studies were screened in Covidence™ software. Stage 4: study data were extracted and charted. Stage 5: findings from included studies were collated, summarised and reported in two ways: (1) a descriptive numerical analysis providing insight into extent, nature and distribution of the included studies, and (2) a narrative summary summarizing the evidence reviewed organised by messaging concepts and by population subgroup. RESULTS: A total of 9525 references were imported into Covidence™ for screening. Of these, 123 studies were included in final analysis. We found that PA messaging evidence is complex and multidimensional in nature, with numerous concepts to consider when creating or evaluating messages. The extent to which these different PA messaging concepts have been researched is variable. Where research has accumulated and evidence is consistent, it supports the following: (1) PA messages should be framed positively and highlight short-term outcomes specifically relating to social and mental health, (2) message content should be tailored or targeted to intended recipient(s), and (3) when developing messages, formative research, psychological theory and/or social marketing principles should be used. CONCLUSION: While it is unlikely to address global inactivity on its own, PA messaging may play a valuable role improving population PA levels. However, it is a complex and multidimensional concept and greater understanding is still needed. We present a synthesis of the existing evidence, highlighting key areas where evidence has accumulated and where gaps lie, as well as recommendations for PA messaging to different population subgroups.


Subject(s)
Exercise/psychology , Health Communication , Health Promotion/methods , Communications Media , Humans , Public Health/trends
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2127892, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1445779

ABSTRACT

Importance: Children's physical activity and screen time are likely suboptimal during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may influence their current and future mental health. Objective: To describe the association of physical activity and screen time with mental health among US children during the pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional survey was conducted from October 22 to November 2, 2020, among 547 parents of children aged 6 to 10 years and 535 parent-child dyads with children and adolescents (hereinafter referred to as children) aged 11 to 17 years and matched down to 500 children per cohort using US Census-based sampling frames. Children aged 11 to 17 years self-reported physical activity, screen time, and mental health, and their parents reported other measures. Parents of children aged 6 to 10 years reported all measures. All 1000 cases were further weighted to a sampling frame corresponding to US parents with children aged 6 to 17 years using propensity scores. Exposures: Child physical activity, screen time, COVID-19 stressors, and demographics. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mental health using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for total difficulties and externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Results: Among the 1000 children included in the analysis (mean [SD] age, 10.8 [3.5] years; 517 [52.6%] boys; 293 [31.6%] American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, or Black individuals or individuals of other race; and 233 [27.8%] Hispanic/Latino individuals), 195 (20.9%) reported at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day. Children reported a mean (SD) of 3.9 (2.2) d/wk with at least 60 minutes of physical activity and 4.4 (2.5) h/d of recreational screen time. COVID-19 stressors were significantly associated with higher total difficulties for both younger (ß coefficient, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9) and older (ß coefficient, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.0-0.7) groups. After accounting for COVID-19 stressors, engaging in 7 d/wk (vs 0) of physical activity was associated with fewer externalizing symptoms in younger children (ß coefficient, -2.0; 95% CI, -3.4 to -0.6). For older children, engaging in 1 to 6 and 7 d/wk (vs 0) of physical activity was associated with lower total difficulties (ß coefficients, -3.5 [95% CI, -5.3 to -1.8] and -3.6 [95% CI, -5.8 to -1.4], respectively), fewer externalizing symptoms (ß coefficients, -1.5 [95% CI, -2.5 to -0.4] and -1.3 [95% CI, -2.6 to 0], respectively), and fewer internalizing symptoms (ß coefficients, -2.1 [95% CI, -3.0 to -1.1] and -2.3 [95% CI, -3.5 to -1.1], respectively). More screen time was correlated with higher total difficulties among younger (ß coefficient, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.5) and older (ß coefficient, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6) children. There were no significant differences by sex. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional survey study, more physical activity and less screen time were associated with better mental health for children, accounting for pandemic stressors. Children engaged in suboptimal amounts of physical activity and screen time, making this a potentially important target for intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise/psychology , Mental Health , Screen Time , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
5.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438685

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multiple lifestyle changes among adults in the United States (USA). METHODS: We conducted a survey, the Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic (HEAP) Study, in October 2020 among USA adults. Participants were selected from the United States using 48 sampling strata, including age, race, ethnicity, education, and gender, and were asked to report five lifestyle behaviors (i.e., exercise time, screen time, fast-food meal consumption, alcohol drinking, and cigarette smoking) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The associations of sociodemographic factors with each lifestyle change were estimated using weighted multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: All 2709 HEAP participants were included in this study. Compared to pre-pandemic, the time spent on exercise decreased (32.06 vs. 38.65 min/day; p < 0.001) and screen time increased (6.79 vs. 5.06 h/day; p < 0.001) during the pandemic. The percentage of individuals who reported consuming fast-food meals ≥3 times/week decreased from 37.7% before the pandemic to 33.3% during the pandemic. The percentage of heavy drinkers (≥5 times/week) increased from 20.9% before the pandemic to 25.7% during the pandemic. Among smokers, heavy smoking (≥11 cigarettes/day) increased from 5.8% before the pandemic to 7.9% during the pandemic. We also identified subgroups who were more vulnerable to adverse influences from the pandemic, including racial/ethnic minority groups and young adults. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had negative impacts on multiple lifestyle behaviors among Americans. Mitigating such negative impacts of COVID-19 requires effective interventions, particularly for some vulnerable subgroups.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Fast Foods/statistics & numerical data , Screen Time , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , Cigarette Smoking/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , /statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , /statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438682

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate changes in the exercise pattern and dietary habits in adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The 12-18-year-old population in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey data of 2019 and 2020 was enrolled. The exercise pattern and dietary habits of 105,600 participants (53,461 in the 2019 group and 52,139 in the 2020 group) were compared. The odds ratios (ORs) for the dietary habits and exercise pattern of the 2020 group compared to the 2019 group were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. The odds of eating fruit, drinking soda, drinking sweet drinks, and consuming fast food were lower in the 2020 group than in the 2019 group (all p < 0.001). The odds of eating breakfast were higher in the 2020 group than in the 2019 group (all p < 0.001). The 2020 group showed lower odds of frequent vigorous and moderate aerobic exercise and higher odds of frequent anaerobic exercise than the 2019 group (all p < 0.001). During the COVID-19 pandemic, adolescents consumed less fruit, soda, and sweet drinks, while they had more breakfast. The frequency of aerobic exercise was lower, while the frequency of anaerobic exercise were higher during the COVID-19 pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Diet/methods , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Surveys/methods , Adolescent , Child , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthy eating and physical activity are effective non-pharmacological approaches to boost immune function and contain the pandemic. We aimed to explore the associations and interactions between physical activity and healthy eating behavior with COVID-19-like symptoms (Slike-CV19S). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3947 outpatients, from 14 February to 2 March 2020, at nine health facilities in Vietnam. Data collection included sociodemographic characteristics, healthy eating behavior (using the healthy eating score (HES) questionnaire), physical activity (using the short form international physical activity questionnaire), and Slike-CV19S. The associations and interactions were tested using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Frequent intake of fruits (OR = 0.84; p = 0.016), vegetables (OR = 0.72; p = 0.036), and fish (OR = 0.43; p < 0.001) were associated with a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared with infrequent intake. Patients with higher HES levels (OR = 0.84; p = 0.033 for medium HES; OR = 0.77; p = 0.006 for high HES) or being physically active (OR = 0.69; p < 0.001) had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES or physical inactivity, respectively. Patients with medium HES who were physically active (OR = 0.69; p = 0.005), or with high HES and physically active (OR = 0.58; p < 0.001), had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES and physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy eating behavior and physical activity showed single and combinative impacts on protecting people from Slike-CV19S. Strategic approaches are encouraged to improve healthy behaviors, which may further contribute to containing the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vietnam , Young Adult
8.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e31278, 2021 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has arguably facilitated a shift toward increased sedentariness and reduced physical activity. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that mental health has also declined during the pandemic. However, it remains unknown to what extent social distancing (SD) behaviors and mental health have affected the physical activity levels of the general population. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of SD behaviors and prevailing mental health on the odds of being physically active during the early COVID-19 pandemic response. METHODS: A total of 4819 adults (2474/4819, 51.3%, female) from the US population with a median age of 46 (IQR 35-59) completed an online survey during the early pandemic response (April-June 2020). The survey included questions on adherence to 11 SD behaviors, and validated questionnaires which assessed self-reported physical activity, depression, anxiety, and mental well-being. Respondents were categorized into 2 physical activity groups: inactive (0-599 metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-minutes/week) and active (≥600 MET-minutes/week). A logistic generalized additive model (GAM) was used to determine which SD factors and mental health outcomes were associated with physical activity level. RESULTS: The GAM analysis revealed that wearing a facemask in public (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.14-1.79; P=.003), limiting the use of public transport (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19-1.83; P=.001), and restricting travel outside the house (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.19-2.05; P=.002) were SD behaviors associated with higher odds of being more physically active. Conversely, avoiding physical activity outside the house was associated with higher odds of being inactive (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.46-0.63; P<.001). Leaving the house more frequently, and a higher mental well-being were associated with increasing odds of being physically active (P<.001). Engaging with a moderate number of SD behaviors (3-7 total) was positively associated with physical activity, whereas a very high SD vigilance (ie, engaging with ≥10 total behaviors) decreased the odds of being active during the early pandemic response. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings of our study, we suggest that future public health messaging of SD guidelines should include (1) a clear portrayal of the benefits of regular exercise on mental health; and (2) a specific focus on how to be physically active outdoors in a COVID-safe manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
11.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(3): 1047-1056, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of the general population. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the determinants of quality of life (QOL) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Impacts of lifestyle changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic on 100 patients with PD and their caregivers/spouses were assessed. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the short form (SF)-8 were used to evaluate health-related QOL. RESULTS: Regarding health-related QOL, physical function, role physical, general health, vitality and the PCS score were significantly worse in PD patients than in caregivers. Worsening of PD-related symptoms, increased stress, and decreased physical activity were observed in 29.0%, 37.0% and 44.0% of PD patients, respectively. Sixteen patients (16.0%) experienced problems with hospital access, but none reported medication shortages. Strong concerns about COVID-19 were reported by 47.0% of caregivers and 50.0% of PD patients. In PD patients, increased gait disturbance and rigidity, disease severity, smoking, the levodopa equivalent dose and decreased body weight predicted a worse PCS score; anxiety, depression, female sex, stress and long disease duration predicted a worse MCS score. In caregivers, age and smoking contributed to a worse PCS score; depression, stress and worsening patient mood contributed to a worse MCS score. CONCLUSION: We report the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on health-related QOL and its determinants in PD patients and their caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers/psychology , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Spouses/psychology , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Health Surveys , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/nursing , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors
12.
Maturitas ; 153: 19-25, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347745

ABSTRACT

Evidence suggests that being physically active may improve quality of life through the menopausal transition. This study is one of the first to investigate how meeting the UK Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG) impacted quality of life, stress, coping and menopausal symptoms in UK midlife women, aged 45-55 years, during the unfolding Covid pandemic (Phase 1 quantitative, n=164). The study also explored their motivation to undertake regular physical activity during Covid lockdown (Phase 2 qualitative, n=4). An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used to collate quantitative (survey) and qualitative (focus group) data. Participants who met PAG experienced fewer depressive symptoms and less perceived stress, and had better physical and mental health and quality of life than women who did not. This was supported by focus group discussions reporting lack of facilities, time constraints, reduced social support and existing health complaints as barriers to physical activity. Factors motivating women to exercise during Covid lockdown were benefits for physical and mental health, and support from friends (Qualitative). Women are postmenopausal for one-third of their lives, and health interventions need to promote positive healthy ageing around menopause. Menopausal changes could be used by clinicians as cues to action to promote female health and well-being. Clinicians should be promoting the health benefits of exercise and making women aware of the importance of aiming to meet the PAG for optimal health benefits. Women should be encouraged to increase their levels of physical activity by making plans and setting goals and gaining support by exercising with friends or family, as a way to better control menopausal symptoms.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Exercise , Menopause , Quality of Life , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , United Kingdom
13.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 284, 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of COVID-19 social distancing on the function, health, and well-being of people with Parkinson disease (PD), and test the association of these effects with patients' activation levels, i.e., their skills and confidence in managing their health. METHODS: Community-dwelling individuals with PD answered an anonymous web-based survey. Part 1 included 27 multiple-choice questions regarding changes in function, health, medical care, and well-being. Part 2 consisted of the Patient Activation Measure, which enquired about skills and confidence in managing one's health. RESULTS: Respondents (N = 142) reported decreases in various function (24.8%-37.3%), health (33.8%-43%), and well-being (26.1%-47.1%) domains. Rehabilitation ceased for 61.2%. Among those reporting a worsening of health, 67.8% associated this with the cessation of rehabilitative treatments or decrease in physical activity. Patients' activation levels were inversely correlated with increased assistance for activities of daily living, increased tiredness, worsening symptoms, and lack of support from family and friends. CONCLUSIONS: Social distancing had a major negative impact on the health and function of people with PD. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Supporting people with PD skills and confidence in managing health may preserve their physical and mental health during this period of dramatic changes in life's circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Physical Distancing , Self-Management/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Health Behavior/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Self-Management/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314709

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused huge changes in people's lifestyle, health, and social relationships. This situation has had an impact on children and adolescents, affecting their health, intellectual, physical, and emotional development. The survey aimed to compare eating behaviors, level of physical activity (PA), hours of sleep, and screen time among Polish children and adolescents aged 6-15 years before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We obtained self-reported data from 1016 participants at two measurement points before and during the COVID-19 lockdown in Poland to examine the influence of the lockdown and the distance learning on PA, dietary habits, sleep, and media usage of children and adolescents aged 6-15 years. The study identified dietary differences and changes in daily activity patterns (reduced sleep duration with higher sleep quality and reduced physical activity). Additionally, the increase in general media usage was observed during the pandemic alongside a reduction in smartphone usage. Together, the findings indicate increased sleep, physical activity, and reduced media usage and screen time among Polish children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Screen Time , Sleep , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet/psychology , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Poland/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 246(21): 2324-2331, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301821

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 disease has been a problem in today's society, which has worldwide effects on different areas, especially on the economy; also, from a health perspective, the disease affects the daily life quality. Physical activity is one major positive factor with regard to enhancing life quality, as it can improve the whole psychological, social, and physical health conditions. Current measures such as social distancing are focused on preventing the viral spread. However, the consequences on other areas are yet to be investigated. Elderly, people with chronic diseases, obese, and others benefit largely from exercise from the perspective of improved health, and preventive measures can drastically improve daily living. In this article, we elaborate the effects of exercise on the immune system and the possible strategies that can be implemented toward greater preventive potential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/physiology , Primary Prevention/methods , Body Composition/physiology , Comorbidity , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Physical Distancing , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295891

ABSTRACT

Alcohol and physical inactivity are risk factors for a variety of cancer types. However, alcohol use often co-occurs with physical activity (PA), which could mitigate the cancer-prevention benefits of PA. Alcohol is integrated into the culture of one of the most popular physical activities for adults in the United States (U.S.), golf. This study examined how alcohol use was associated with total PA, golf-specific PA, and motives for golfing in a national sample of golfers in the U.S. Adult golfers (n = 338; 51% male, 81% White, 46 ± 14.4 years) self-reported alcohol use, golfing behavior and motives, and PA. Most (84%) golfers consumed alcohol, averaging 7.91 servings/week. Golf participation, including days/week, holes/week, and practice hours/week, was not associated with alcohol use. Golfers with stronger social motives were 60% more likely to consume alcohol. Weekly walking (incident risk ratio (IRR) = 7.30), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA; IRR = 5.04), and total PA (IRR = 4.14) were associated with more alcohol servings/week. Golfers' alcohol use may be higher than the general adult population in the U.S. and contributes 775 extra kilocalories/week, a surplus that may offset PA-related energy expenditure and cancer-protective effects. Alcohol use interventions targeting golfers may facilitate weight loss and reduce cancer risk, especially for golfers motivated by social status.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Golf/psychology , Motivation , Psychological Distance , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States , Young Adult
17.
Soc Work Public Health ; 36(6): 628-637, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294640

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 affects the whole world and restricts the social life globally. The obligation to stay at home can cause psychological disorders for people. For this reason, physical activities at home are crucial to reduce the level of anxiety, protect against negative feelings, and strengthen the mental health. This study aims to investigate how COVID-19 affects the social life and the anxiety levels of people at home during the quarantine process within the framework of a solution-oriented approach. In this study, one of the qualitative research patterns "phenomenology" has been used to determine the opinions of the participants. The study group of the research consists of 14 people with moderate income who actively participate in anxiety-reducing activities of an International Coach Federation (ICF) consultancy center in Istanbul. The themes have been created in line with the answers obtained by the result of content analysis as "questioning the process, understanding yourself, internal purification," and sub-themes of these determined themes have also been created. It has been concluded that during quarantine; excessively exposed to media, the state of uncertainty about the end of the pandemic, the thought of themselves or their loved ones catching the virus, and the application of social isolation increase the anxiety. However, the participants have stated that by the help of physical activities performed at home, sleep disorders have been eliminated, concentration deficiency in activities carried out from home improved, and anger and tension decreased. As a result, it is concluded that participants' stress and anxiety levels are reduced by physical activity at home.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Exercise , Quarantine , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Quarantine/psychology
18.
J Foot Ankle Res ; 14(1): 46, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, populations were advised to remain at home to control viral spread. Government-mandated restrictions on free movement affected individuals' engagement with physical activity, with reported increases leading to biopsychosocial health benefits and conversely increased sedentary behaviour leading to poorer health. Good foot health is key to enabling physical activity and maximal participation in activities of occupation and daily living. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was performed, using a web-based platform. Quantitative and qualitative data were captured through responses to closed and open survey questions. Anybody with a foot health condition was eligible to participate in the online survey. Links were sent through professional networks, support groups and charities, using a snowball strategy to maximise participation. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-five respondents completed the survey. Most (n = 193, 75.69%) reported an ongoing foot pain or problem that had been present for 4 weeks or longer, whilst 49 respondents (19.22%) noted a new pain or problem. Pain was the most frequently reported symptom (n = 139, 54.51%), whilst change in appearance of the foot was also commonly reported (n = 122, 47.84%), often alongside the observable presence of swelling. Musculoskeletal foot symptoms were frequently reported (n = 123, 48%), and were significantly associated with reported reduced physical activity (X2 = 6.61, p = 0.010). Following qualitative analysis five themes and 11 subthemes emerged, informed by 49 independent codes. A central theme of lockdown disrupting support networks, both formal (healthcare providers) and informal (friends or family members) emerged. The 5 sub-themes were: 1. foot pain is a constant companion, 2. self-care, 3. 'cope or crumble' scenarios, 4. future intent to access healthcare and 5. reduced ability to undertake physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Pain was the most frequently reported foot problem during COVID-19 lockdown restriction. Lockdown restrictions disrupted support networks integral to maintaining foot health. Poor foot health impacted people's ability to remain physically active. Complaints previously considered relatively 'minor' such as support for skin and nail care, were found to be exacerbated by restricted support networks, leading to greater negative impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Foot/pathology , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Female , Government Regulation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Pain/diagnosis , Patient Participation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sedentary Behavior , Self Care/psychology , Self-Help Groups/organization & administration , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Health Care Women Int ; 41(11-12): 1240-1254, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263595

ABSTRACT

In this study, researchers aimed to determine exercise habits, physical activity (PA) levels and anxiety levels of postmenopausal women (PMw) during the self-quarantine period of the COVID-19 pandemic. 104 PMw (59.00 ± 6.61 years old) participated in the study. It was found that PMw who had exercise habits before the pandemic period had higher PA levels, and the women with high anxiety levels during the pandemic had lower PA levels (p < .05). Anxiety levels and PA were negatively associated with each other. Numbers of grandchildren also affected the PA and anxiety levels of the PMw negatively. Women should be encouraged to initiate or maintain PA levels in all circumstances.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Postmenopause/psychology , Aged , Cyprus/epidemiology , Female , Habits , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes not only severe illness but also detrimental effects associated with the lockdown measures. The present study aimed to evaluate reported lifestyle changes in a cohort of adults in Italy, including physical exercise, food choices, and psychological wellbeing, after two months of lockdown. METHODS: A web survey on social media (Facebook and LinkedIn) of 32 multiple-choice questions aiming to evaluate the impact of the national COVID-19 lockdown in a sample of Italian adults. RESULTS: We received 1378 complete responses (women 68.3%, mean age 39.5 ± 12.5 years). The percentage of participants reporting regular exercise decreased during lockdown (52 vs. 56.5%). The vast majority of people continued to consume the three traditional meals per day, but the consumption of meat, fish, and eggs significantly decreased. Women reported more frequent anxiety, sadness, fear, and feelings of insecurity than men. The factors predicting the worst outcome during the lockdown were being a woman, low education and income, gastrointestinal diseases. CONCLUSION: The lockdown has had a limited impact on food choices and physical exercise in Italian adults of our series, since most of them made an effort to improve their lifestyle. However, women with gastrointestinal diseases reported more frequent negative feelings and poor adaptation to the lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Emotions , Female , Humans , Italy , Life Style , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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