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1.
J Med Chem ; 65(8): 6231-6249, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867997

ABSTRACT

Enzymes involved in RNA capping of SARS-CoV-2 are essential for the stability of viral RNA, translation of mRNAs, and virus evasion from innate immunity, making them attractive targets for antiviral agents. In this work, we focused on the design and synthesis of nucleoside-derived inhibitors against the SARS-CoV-2 nsp14 (N7-guanine)-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) that catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) cofactor to the N7-guanosine cap. Seven compounds out of 39 SAM analogues showed remarkable double-digit nanomolar inhibitory activity against the N7-MTase nsp14. Molecular docking supported the structure-activity relationships of these inhibitors and a bisubstrate-based mechanism of action. The three most potent inhibitors significantly stabilized nsp14 (ΔTm ≈ 11 °C), and the best inhibitor demonstrated high selectivity for nsp14 over human RNA N7-MTase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Exoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Humans , Methyltransferases , Molecular Docking Simulation , RNA, Viral/genetics , S-Adenosylmethionine , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
2.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(9)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684239

ABSTRACT

High-fidelity replication of the large RNA genome of coronaviruses (CoVs) is mediated by a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN) in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14), which excises nucleotides including antiviral drugs misincorporated by the low-fidelity viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and has also been implicated in viral RNA recombination and resistance to innate immunity. Here, we determined a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV 2 (SARS-CoV-2) ExoN in complex with its essential cofactor, nsp10. The structure shows a highly basic and concave surface flanking the active site, comprising several Lys residues of nsp14 and the N-terminal amino group of nsp10. Modeling suggests that this basic patch binds to the template strand of double-stranded RNA substrates to position the 3' end of the nascent strand in the ExoN active site, which is corroborated by mutational and computational analyses. We also show that the ExoN activity can rescue a stalled RNA primer poisoned with sofosbuvir and allow RdRp to continue its extension in the presence of the chain-terminating drug, biochemically recapitulating proofreading in SARS-CoV-2 replication. Molecular dynamics simulations further show remarkable flexibility of multidomain nsp14 and suggest that nsp10 stabilizes ExoN for substrate RNA binding to support its exonuclease activity. Our high-resolution structure of the SARS-CoV-2 ExoN-nsp10 complex serves as a platform for future development of anticoronaviral drugs or strategies to attenuate the viral virulence.


Subject(s)
Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Protein Domains , RNA, Viral/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Crystallography, X-Ray , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Lysine/chemistry , Lysine/genetics , Lysine/metabolism , Mutation, Missense , Protein Binding , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(49)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541316

ABSTRACT

As coronaviruses (CoVs) replicate in the host cell cytoplasm, they rely on their own capping machinery to ensure the efficient translation of their messenger RNAs (mRNAs), protect them from degradation by cellular 5' exoribonucleases (ExoNs), and escape innate immune sensing. The CoV nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) is a bifunctional replicase subunit harboring an N-terminal 3'-to-5' ExoN domain and a C-terminal (N7-guanine)-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) domain that is presumably involved in viral mRNA capping. Here, we aimed to integrate structural, biochemical, and virological data to assess the importance of conserved N7-MTase residues for nsp14's enzymatic activities and virus viability. We revisited the crystal structure of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV nsp14 to perform an in silico comparative analysis between betacoronaviruses. We identified several residues likely involved in the formation of the N7-MTase catalytic pocket, which presents a fold distinct from the Rossmann fold observed in most known MTases. Next, for SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV, site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues was used to assess their importance for in vitro enzymatic activity. Most of the engineered mutations abolished N7-MTase activity, while not affecting nsp14-ExoN activity. Upon reverse engineering of these mutations into different betacoronavirus genomes, we identified two substitutions (R310A and F426A in SARS-CoV nsp14) abrogating virus viability and one mutation (H424A) yielding a crippled phenotype across all viruses tested. Our results identify the N7-MTase as a critical enzyme for betacoronavirus replication and define key residues of its catalytic pocket that can be targeted to design inhibitors with a potential pan-coronaviral activity spectrum.


Subject(s)
Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Base Sequence , Binding Sites , Catalytic Domain , Conserved Sequence , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Microbial Viability , Nucleotide Motifs , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/genetics
4.
Chembiochem ; 22(24): 3410-3413, 2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427071

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 non-structural protein 14 (nsp14), known as exoribonuclease is encoded from the large polyprotein of viral genome and is a major constituent of the transcription replication complex (TRC) machinery of the viral RNA synthesis. This protein is highly conserved among the coronaviruses and is a potential target for the development of a therapeutic drug. Here, we report the SARS-CoV-2 nsp14 expression, show its structural characterization, and ss-RNA exonuclease activity through vibrational and electronic spectroscopies. The deconvolution of amide-I band in the FTIR spectrum of the protein revealed a composition of 35 % α-helix and 25 % ß-sheets. The binding between protein and RNA is evidenced from the spectral changes in the amide-I region of the nsp14, showing protein conformational changes during the binding process. A value of 20.60±3.81 mol L-1 of the binding constant (KD ) is obtained for nsp14/RNA complex. The findings reported here can motivate further studies to develop structural models for better understanding the mechanism of exonuclease enzymes for correcting the viral genome and can help in the development of drugs against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Exoribonucleases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral/chemistry , Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
5.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(9): 5382-5392, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387965

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 infection has posed unprecedented threat to global public health. The virus-encoded non-structural protein 14 (nsp14) is a bi-functional enzyme consisting of an exoribonuclease (ExoN) domain and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and plays a pivotal role in viral replication. Here, we report the structure of SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN domain bound to its co-factor nsp10 and show that, compared to the SARS-CoV nsp10/nsp14-full-length complex, SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN retains an integral exoribonuclease fold and preserves an active configuration in the catalytic center. Analysis of the nsp10/nsp14-ExoN interface reveals a footprint in nsp10 extensively overlapping with that observed in the nsp10/nsp16 structure. A marked difference in the co-factor when engaging nsp14 and nsp16 lies in helix-α1', which is further experimentally ascertained to be involved in nsp14-binding but not in nsp16-engagement. Finally, we also show that nsp10/nsp14-ExoN is enzymatically active despite the absence of nsp14-MTase domain. These data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 nsp10/nsp14-ExoN functions as an exoribonuclease with both structural and functional integrity.


Subject(s)
Biocatalysis , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Guanine , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/deficiency , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Domains/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
6.
Science ; 373(6559): 1142-1146, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329031

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN), residing in the nonstructural protein (nsp) 10­nsp14 complex, boosts replication fidelity by proofreading RNA synthesis and is critical for the virus life cycle. ExoN also recognizes and excises nucleotide analog inhibitors incorporated into the nascent RNA, undermining the effectiveness of nucleotide analog­based antivirals. Here we present cryo­electron microscopy structures of both wild-type and mutant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nsp10-nsp14 in complex with an RNA substrate bearing a 3'-end mismatch at resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 3.9 angstroms. The structures reveal the molecular determinants of ExoN substrate specificity and offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of mismatch correction during coronavirus RNA synthesis. Our findings provide guidance for rational design of improved anticoronavirus therapies.


Subject(s)
DNA Mismatch Repair , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Drug Design , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Humans , Protein Domains , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Substrate Specificity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
7.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(9): 5382-5392, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217861

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 infection has posed unprecedented threat to global public health. The virus-encoded non-structural protein 14 (nsp14) is a bi-functional enzyme consisting of an exoribonuclease (ExoN) domain and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and plays a pivotal role in viral replication. Here, we report the structure of SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN domain bound to its co-factor nsp10 and show that, compared to the SARS-CoV nsp10/nsp14-full-length complex, SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN retains an integral exoribonuclease fold and preserves an active configuration in the catalytic center. Analysis of the nsp10/nsp14-ExoN interface reveals a footprint in nsp10 extensively overlapping with that observed in the nsp10/nsp16 structure. A marked difference in the co-factor when engaging nsp14 and nsp16 lies in helix-α1', which is further experimentally ascertained to be involved in nsp14-binding but not in nsp16-engagement. Finally, we also show that nsp10/nsp14-ExoN is enzymatically active despite the absence of nsp14-MTase domain. These data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 nsp10/nsp14-ExoN functions as an exoribonuclease with both structural and functional integrity.


Subject(s)
Biocatalysis , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Guanine , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/deficiency , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Domains/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
8.
Biomol NMR Assign ; 15(1): 65-71, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184741

ABSTRACT

The international Covid19-NMR consortium aims at the comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of SARS-CoV-2 RNA elements and proteins and will provide NMR chemical shift assignments of the molecular components of this virus. The SARS-CoV-2 genome encodes approximately 30 different proteins. Four of these proteins are involved in forming the viral envelope or in the packaging of the RNA genome and are therefore called structural proteins. The other proteins fulfill a variety of functions during the viral life cycle and comprise the so-called non-structural proteins (nsps). Here, we report the near-complete NMR resonance assignment for the backbone chemical shifts of the non-structural protein 10 (nsp10). Nsp10 is part of the viral replication-transcription complex (RTC). It aids in synthesizing and modifying the genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Via its interaction with nsp14, it ensures transcriptional fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and through its stimulation of the methyltransferase activity of nsp16, it aids in synthesizing the RNA cap structures which protect the viral RNAs from being recognized by the innate immune system. Both of these functions can be potentially targeted by drugs. Our data will aid in performing additional NMR-based characterizations, and provide a basis for the identification of possible small molecule ligands interfering with nsp10 exerting its essential role in viral replication.


Subject(s)
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Amino Acid Motifs , Carbon Isotopes , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Hydrogen , Hydrogen Bonding , Ligands , Methyltransferases , Nitrogen Isotopes , Protein Structure, Secondary , RNA, Viral , Viral Envelope , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Virus Replication , Zinc Fingers
9.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 168: 272-278, 2021 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065145

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2is the causative agent for the ongoing COVID19 pandemic, and this virus belongs to the Coronaviridae family. The nsp14 protein of SARS-CoV-2 houses a 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activity responsible for removing mismatches that arise during genome duplication. A homology model of nsp10-nsp14 complex was used to carry out in silico screening to identify molecules among natural products, or FDA approved drugs that can potentially inhibit the activity of nsp14. This exercise showed that ritonavir might bind to the exoribonuclease active site of the nsp14 protein. A model of the SARS-CoV-2-nsp10-nsp14 complex bound to substrate RNA showed that the ritonavir binding site overlaps with that of the 3' nucleotide of substrate RNA. A comparison of the calculated energies of binding for RNA and ritonavir suggested that the drug may bind to the active site of nsp14 with significant affinity. It is, therefore, possible that ritonavir may prevent association with substrate RNA and thus inhibit the exoribonuclease activity of nsp14. Overall, our computational studies suggest that ritonavir may serve as an effective inhibitor of the nsp14 protein. nsp14 is known to attenuate the inhibitory effect of drugs that function through premature termination of viral genome replication. Hence, ritonavir may potentiate the therapeutic properties of drugs such as remdesivir, favipiravir and ribavirin.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Exoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , Ritonavir/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Computer Simulation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 168: 272-278, 2021 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987985

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2is the causative agent for the ongoing COVID19 pandemic, and this virus belongs to the Coronaviridae family. The nsp14 protein of SARS-CoV-2 houses a 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activity responsible for removing mismatches that arise during genome duplication. A homology model of nsp10-nsp14 complex was used to carry out in silico screening to identify molecules among natural products, or FDA approved drugs that can potentially inhibit the activity of nsp14. This exercise showed that ritonavir might bind to the exoribonuclease active site of the nsp14 protein. A model of the SARS-CoV-2-nsp10-nsp14 complex bound to substrate RNA showed that the ritonavir binding site overlaps with that of the 3' nucleotide of substrate RNA. A comparison of the calculated energies of binding for RNA and ritonavir suggested that the drug may bind to the active site of nsp14 with significant affinity. It is, therefore, possible that ritonavir may prevent association with substrate RNA and thus inhibit the exoribonuclease activity of nsp14. Overall, our computational studies suggest that ritonavir may serve as an effective inhibitor of the nsp14 protein. nsp14 is known to attenuate the inhibitory effect of drugs that function through premature termination of viral genome replication. Hence, ritonavir may potentiate the therapeutic properties of drugs such as remdesivir, favipiravir and ribavirin.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Exoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , Ritonavir/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Computer Simulation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
J Virol ; 94(23)2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975641

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) stand out for their large RNA genome and complex RNA-synthesizing machinery comprising 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). The bifunctional nsp14 contains 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN) and guanine-N7-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) domains. While the latter presumably supports mRNA capping, ExoN is thought to mediate proofreading during genome replication. In line with such a role, ExoN knockout mutants of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) were previously reported to have crippled but viable hypermutation phenotypes. Remarkably, using reverse genetics, a large set of corresponding ExoN knockout mutations has now been found to be lethal for another betacoronavirus, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). For 13 mutants, viral progeny could not be recovered, unless-as happened occasionally-reversion had first occurred. Only a single mutant was viable, likely because its E191D substitution is highly conservative. Remarkably, a SARS-CoV-2 ExoN knockout mutant was found to be unable to replicate, resembling observations previously made for alpha- and gammacoronaviruses, but starkly contrasting with the documented phenotype of ExoN knockout mutants of the closely related SARS-CoV. Subsequently, we established in vitro assays with purified recombinant MERS-CoV nsp14 to monitor its ExoN and N7-MTase activities. All ExoN knockout mutations that proved lethal in reverse genetics were found to severely decrease ExoN activity while not affecting N7-MTase activity. Our study strongly suggests that CoV nsp14 ExoN has an additional function, which apparently is critical for primary viral RNA synthesis and thus differs from the proofreading function that, based on previous MHV and SARS-CoV studies, was proposed to boost longer-term replication fidelity.IMPORTANCE The bifunctional nsp14 subunit of the coronavirus replicase contains 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN) and guanine-N7-methyltransferase domains. For the betacoronaviruses MHV and SARS-CoV, ExoN was reported to promote the fidelity of genome replication, presumably by mediating a form of proofreading. For these viruses, ExoN knockout mutants are viable while displaying an increased mutation frequency. Strikingly, we have now established that the equivalent ExoN knockout mutants of two other betacoronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, are nonviable, suggesting an additional and critical ExoN function in their replication. This is remarkable in light of the very limited genetic distance between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, which is highlighted, for example, by 95% amino acid sequence identity in their nsp14 sequences. For (recombinant) MERS-CoV nsp14, both its enzymatic activities were evaluated using newly developed in vitro assays that can be used to characterize these key replicative enzymes in more detail and explore their potential as target for antiviral drug development.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication , Animals , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Catalytic Domain , Cell Line , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Fluorouracil/pharmacology , Gene Knockout Techniques , Genome, Viral , Humans , Methylation , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/enzymology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Mutation , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Plaque Assay , Zinc Fingers
12.
J Proteome Res ; 19(11): 4670-4677, 2020 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960278

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has led to the death of more than 675,000 worldwide and over 150,000 in the United States alone. However, there are currently no approved effective pharmacotherapies for COVID-19. Here, we combine homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding affinity calculations to determine potential targets for toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator which we have previously identified as a SARS-CoV-2 inhibitor. Our results indicate the possibility of inhibition of the spike glycoprotein by toremifene, responsible for aiding in fusion of the viral membrane with the cell membrane, via a perturbation to the fusion core. An interaction between the dimethylamine end of toremifene and residues Q954 and N955 in heptad repeat 1 (HR1) perturbs the structure, causing a shift from what is normally a long, helical region to short helices connected by unstructured regions. Additionally, we found a strong interaction between toremifene and the methyltransferase nonstructural protein (NSP) 14, which could be inhibitory to viral replication via its active site. These results suggest potential structural mechanisms for toremifene by blocking the spike protein and NSP14 of SARS-CoV-2, offering a drug candidate for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Exoribonucleases , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Toremifene , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19 , Drug Repositioning , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toremifene/chemistry , Toremifene/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
13.
Biomol NMR Assign ; 15(1): 65-71, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-915245

ABSTRACT

The international Covid19-NMR consortium aims at the comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of SARS-CoV-2 RNA elements and proteins and will provide NMR chemical shift assignments of the molecular components of this virus. The SARS-CoV-2 genome encodes approximately 30 different proteins. Four of these proteins are involved in forming the viral envelope or in the packaging of the RNA genome and are therefore called structural proteins. The other proteins fulfill a variety of functions during the viral life cycle and comprise the so-called non-structural proteins (nsps). Here, we report the near-complete NMR resonance assignment for the backbone chemical shifts of the non-structural protein 10 (nsp10). Nsp10 is part of the viral replication-transcription complex (RTC). It aids in synthesizing and modifying the genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Via its interaction with nsp14, it ensures transcriptional fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and through its stimulation of the methyltransferase activity of nsp16, it aids in synthesizing the RNA cap structures which protect the viral RNAs from being recognized by the innate immune system. Both of these functions can be potentially targeted by drugs. Our data will aid in performing additional NMR-based characterizations, and provide a basis for the identification of possible small molecule ligands interfering with nsp10 exerting its essential role in viral replication.


Subject(s)
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Amino Acid Motifs , Carbon Isotopes , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Hydrogen , Hydrogen Bonding , Ligands , Methyltransferases , Nitrogen Isotopes , Protein Structure, Secondary , RNA, Viral , Viral Envelope , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Virus Replication , Zinc Fingers
14.
Cells ; 9(5)2020 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324261

ABSTRACT

The current coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is due to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The scientific community has mounted a strong response by accelerating research and innovation, and has quickly set the foundation for understanding the molecular determinants of the disease for the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. The replication of the viral genome within the infected cells is a key stage of the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle. It is a complex process involving the action of several viral and host proteins in order to perform RNA polymerization, proofreading and final capping. This review provides an update of the structural and functional data on the key actors of the replicatory machinery of SARS-CoV-2, to fill the gaps in the currently available structural data, which is mainly obtained through homology modeling. Moreover, learning from similar viruses, we collect data from the literature to reconstruct the pattern of interactions among the protein actors of the SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase machinery. Here, an important role is played by co-factors such as Nsp8 and Nsp10, not only as allosteric activators but also as molecular connectors that hold the entire machinery together to enhance the efficiency of RNA replication.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , COVID-19 , Catalytic Domain , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/metabolism , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Pandemics , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism
15.
Antiviral Res ; 178: 104793, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-53718

ABSTRACT

The rapid global emergence of SARS-CoV-2 has been the cause of significant health concern, highlighting the immediate need for antivirals. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) play essential roles in viral RNA synthesis, and thus remains the target of choice for the prophylactic or curative treatment of several viral diseases, due to high sequence and structural conservation. To date, the most promising broad-spectrum class of viral RdRp inhibitors are nucleoside analogues (NAs), with over 25 approved for the treatment of several medically important viral diseases. However, Coronaviruses stand out as a particularly challenging case for NA drug design due to the presence of an exonuclease (ExoN) domain capable of excising incorporated NAs and thus providing resistance to many of these available antivirals. Here we use the available structures of the SARS-CoV RdRp and ExoN proteins, as well as Lassa virus N exonuclease to derive models of catalytically competent SARS-CoV-2 enzymes. We then map a promising NA candidate, GS-441524 (the active metabolite of Remdesivir) to the nucleoside active site of both proteins, identifying the residues important for nucleotide recognition, discrimination, and excision. Interestingly, GS-441524 addresses both enzyme active sites in a manner consistent with significant incorporation, delayed chain termination, and altered excision due to the ribose 1'-CN group, which may account for the increased antiviral effect compared to other available analogues. Additionally, we propose structural and function implications of two previously identified RdRp resistance mutations in relation to resistance against Remdesivir. This study highlights the importance of considering the balance between incorporation and excision properties of NAs between the RdRp and ExoN.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antimetabolites/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/pharmacology , Antimetabolites/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Drug Resistance, Viral , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
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