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1.
J Diabetes Res ; 2021: 4632745, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556856

ABSTRACT

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common pregnancy complication which is normally diagnosed in the second trimester of gestation. With an increasing incidence, GDM poses a significant threat to maternal and offspring health. Therefore, we need a deeper understanding of GDM pathophysiology and novel investigation on the diagnosis and treatment for GDM. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of endogenic small noncoding RNAs with a length of approximately 19-24 nucleotides, have been reported to exert their function in gene expression by binding to proteins or being enclosed in membranous vesicles, such as exosomes. Studies have investigated the roles of miRNAs in the pathophysiological mechanism of GDM and their potential as noninvasive biological candidates for the management of GDM, including diagnosis and treatment. This review is aimed at summarizing the pathophysiological significance of miRNAs in GDM development and their potential function in GDM clinical diagnosis and therapeutic approach. In this review, we summarized an integrated expressional profile and the pathophysiological significance of placental exosomes and associated miRNAs, as well as other plasma miRNAs such as exo-AT. Furthermore, we also discussed the practical application of exosomes in GDM postpartum outcomes and the potential function of several miRNAs as therapeutic target in the GDM pathological pathway, thus providing a novel clinical insight of these biological signatures into GDM therapeutic approach.


Subject(s)
Diabetes, Gestational/drug therapy , MicroRNAs/pharmacology , Adult , Diabetes, Gestational/genetics , Exosomes/metabolism , Female , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression/physiology , Humans , MicroRNAs/metabolism , MicroRNAs/therapeutic use , Pregnancy
2.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551568

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global challenge, demanding researchers address different approaches in relation to prevention, diagnostics and therapeutics. Amongst the many tactics of tackling these therapeutic challenges, small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) or exosomes are emerging as a new frontier in the field of ameliorating viral infections. Exosomes are part of extracellular vesicles (EVs)-spherical biological structures with a lipid bilayer of a diameter of up to 5000 nm, which are released into the intercellular space by most types of eukaryotic cells, both in physiological and pathological states. EVs share structural similarities to viruses, such as small size, common mechanisms of biogenesis and mechanisms for cell entry. The role of EVs in promoting the viral spread by evading the immune response of the host, which is exhibited by retroviruses, indicates the potential for further investigation and possible manipulation of these processes when tackling the spread and treatment of COVID-19. The following paper introduces the topic of the use of exosomes in the treatment of viral infections, and presents the future prospects for the use of these EVs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526805

ABSTRACT

The advancement of precision medicine critically depends on the robustness and specificity of the carriers used for the targeted delivery of effector molecules in the human body. Numerous nanocarriers have been explored in vivo, to ensure the precise delivery of molecular cargos via tissue-specific targeting, including the endocrine part of the pancreas, thyroid, and adrenal glands. However, even after reaching the target organ, the cargo-carrying vehicle needs to enter the cell and then escape lysosomal destruction. Most artificial nanocarriers suffer from intrinsic limitations that prevent them from completing the specific delivery of the cargo. In this respect, extracellular vesicles (EVs) seem to be the natural tool for payload delivery due to their versatility and low toxicity. However, EV-mediated delivery is not selective and is usually short-ranged. By inserting the viral membrane fusion proteins into exosomes, it is possible to increase the efficiency of membrane recognition and also ease the process of membrane fusion. This review describes the molecular details of the viral-assisted interaction between the target cell and EVs. We also discuss the question of the usability of viral fusion proteins in developing extracellular vesicle-based nanocarriers with a higher efficacy of payload delivery. Finally, this review specifically highlights the role of Gag and RNA binding proteins in RNA sorting into EVs.


Subject(s)
Exosomes/metabolism , RNA Transport , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Fusion
5.
Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) ; 26(10): 948-961, 2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498509

ABSTRACT

Background: Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary pathogenesis is over-activation of the immune system. SARS-CoV-2 continues to mutate and spread rapidly and no effective treatment options are yet available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to induce anti-inflammatory macrophages, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells. There are a rapidly increasing number of clinical investigations of cell-based therapy approaches for COVID-19. Objective: To summarize the pathogenic mechanism of SARS-CoV-2, and systematically formulated the immunomodulation of COVID-19 by MSCs and their exosomes, as well as research progress. Method: Searching PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov and Chictr.cn for eligible studies to be published or registered by May 2021. Main keywords and search strategies were as follows: ((Mesenchymal stem cells) OR (MSCs)) AND (COVID-19). Results: MSCs regulate the immune system to prevent cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and to promote endogenous repair by releasing various paracrine factors and exosomes. Conclusions: MSC therapy is thus a promising candidate for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Exosomes/transplantation , Immunomodulation/immunology , Lung Injury/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Exosomes/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Lung Injury/physiopathology , Lung Injury/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Regeneration/immunology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(12)2021 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472414

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are rising in global prevalence and cause significant morbidity for patients. Current treatments are limited to slowing instead of stabilising or reversing disease progression. In this review, we describe mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their constituents, extracellular vesicles (EVs) as being a novel therapeutic for CKD. MSC-derived EVs (MSC-EVs) are membrane-enclosed particles, including exosomes, which carry genetic information that mimics the phenotype of their cell of origin. MSC-EVs deliver their cargo of mRNA, miRNA, cytokines, and growth factors to target cells as a form of paracrine communication. This genetically reprograms pathophysiological pathways, which are upregulated in renal failure. Since the method of exosome preparation significantly affects the quality and function of MSC-exosomes, this review compares the methodologies for isolating exosomes from MSCs and their role in tissue regeneration. More specifically, it summarises the therapeutic efficacy of MSC-EVs in 60 preclinical animal models of AKI and CKD and the cargo of biomolecules they deliver. MSC-EVs promote tubular proliferation and angiogenesis, and inhibit apoptosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and fibrosis, to alleviate AKI and CKD. By reprogramming these pathophysiological pathways, MSC-EVs can slow or even reverse the progression of AKI to CKD, and therefore offer potential to transform clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Biological Therapy , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/transplantation , Kidney Diseases/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Animals , Apoptosis/drug effects , Biological Therapy/methods , Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Self Renewal , Chemical Fractionation , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Kidney Diseases/pathology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Protective Agents , Renal Insufficiency/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/metabolism , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy
7.
J Immunol ; 207(10): 2405-2410, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471046

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes severe acute respiratory syndrome. mRNA vaccines directed at the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein resulted in development of Abs and protective immunity. To determine the mechanism, we analyzed the kinetics of induction of circulating exosomes with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and Ab following vaccination of healthy individuals. Results demonstrated induction of circulating exosomes expressing spike protein on day 14 after vaccination followed by Abs 14 d after the second dose. Exosomes with spike protein, Abs to SARS-CoV-2 spike, and T cells secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α increased following the booster dose. Transmission electron microscopy of exosomes also demonstrated spike protein Ags on their surface. Exosomes with spike protein and Abs decreased in parallel after four months. These results demonstrate an important role of circulating exosomes with spike protein for effective immunization following mRNA-based vaccination. This is further documented by induction of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice immunized with exosomes carrying spike protein.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Animals , Blood Circulation , Cells, Cultured , Exosomes/immunology , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Immunization , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Vaccination
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463703

ABSTRACT

Exosomes are associated with cancer progression, pregnancy, cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system-related diseases, immune responses and viral pathogenicity. However, study on the role of exosomes in the immune response of teleost fish, especially antiviral immunity, is limited. Herein, serum-derived exosomes from mandarin fish were used to investigate the antiviral effect on the exosomes of teleost fish. Exosomes isolated from mandarin fish serum by ultra-centrifugation were internalized by mandarin fish fry cells and were able to inhibit Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) infection. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms of exosomes in inhibiting ISKNV infection, the protein composition of serum-derived exosomes was analyzed by mass spectrometry. It was found that myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx1) was incorporated by exosomes. Furthermore, the mandarin fish Mx1 protein was proven to be transferred into the recipient cells though exosomes. Our results showed that the serum-derived exosomes from mandarin fish could inhibit ISKNV replication, which suggested an underlying mechanism of the exosome antivirus in that it incorporates Mx1 protein and delivery into recipient cells. This study provided evidence for the important antiviral role of exosomes in the immune system of teleost fish.


Subject(s)
DNA Virus Infections , Exosomes , Fish Diseases , Fish Proteins , Fishes , Iridoviridae , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins , Animals , Cell Line , DNA Virus Infections/blood , DNA Virus Infections/immunology , DNA Virus Infections/veterinary , Exosomes/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Fish Diseases/blood , Fish Diseases/immunology , Fish Proteins/blood , Fish Proteins/immunology , Fishes/blood , Fishes/immunology , Fishes/virology , Iridoviridae/immunology , Iridoviridae/metabolism , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/blood , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/immunology
9.
mBio ; 12(5): e0254221, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462902

ABSTRACT

Damage in COVID-19 results from both the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its triggered overactive host immune responses. Therapeutic agents that focus solely on reducing viral load or hyperinflammation fail to provide satisfying outcomes in all cases. Although viral and cellular factors have been extensively profiled to identify potential anti-COVID-19 targets, new drugs with significant efficacy remain to be developed. Here, we report the potent preclinical efficacy of ALD-R491, a vimentin-targeting small molecule compound, in treating COVID-19 through its host-directed antiviral and anti-inflammatory actions. We found that by altering the physical properties of vimentin filaments, ALD-491 affected general cellular processes as well as specific cellular functions relevant to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Specifically, ALD-R491 reduced endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, and exosomal release, thus impeding the entry and egress of the virus; increased the microcidal capacity of macrophages, thus facilitating the pathogen clearance; and enhanced the activity of regulatory T cells, therefore suppressing the overactive immune responses. In cultured cells, ALD-R491 potently inhibited the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and human ACE2-mediated pseudoviral infection. In aged mice with ongoing, productive SARS-CoV-2 infection, ALD-R491 reduced disease symptoms as well as lung damage. In rats, ALD-R491 also reduced bleomycin-induced lung injury and fibrosis. Our results indicate a unique mechanism and significant therapeutic potential for ALD-R491 against COVID-19. We anticipate that ALD-R491, an oral, fast-acting, and non-cytotoxic agent targeting the cellular protein with multipart actions, will be convenient, safe, and broadly effective, regardless of viral mutations, for patients with early- or late-stage disease, post-COVID-19 complications, and other related diseases. IMPORTANCE With the Delta variant currently fueling a resurgence of new infections in the fully vaccinated population, developing an effective therapeutic drug is especially critical and urgent in fighting COVID-19. In contrast to the many efforts to repurpose existing drugs or address only one aspect of COVID-19, we are developing a novel agent with first-in-class mechanisms of action that address both the viral infection and the overactive immune system in the pathogenesis of the disease. Unlike virus-directed therapeutics that may lose efficacy due to viral mutations, and immunosuppressants that require ideal timing to be effective, this agent, with its unique host-directed antiviral and anti-inflammatory actions, can work against all variants of the virus, be effective during all stages of the disease, and even resolve post-disease damage and complications. Further development of the compound will provide an important tool in the fight against COVID-19 and its complications, as well as future outbreaks of new viruses.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Organic Chemicals/therapeutic use , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vimentin/metabolism , Animals , Endocytosis/drug effects , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Exosomes/drug effects , Exosomes/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , RAW 264.7 Cells
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383877

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, are newly recognized fundamental, universally produced natural nanoparticles of life that are seemingly involved in all biologic processes and clinical diseases. Due to their universal involvements, understanding the nature and also the potential therapeutic uses of these nanovesicles requires innovative experimental approaches in virtually every field. Of the EV group, exosome nanovesicles and larger companion micro vesicles can mediate completely new biologic and clinical processes dependent on the intercellular transfer of proteins and most importantly selected RNAs, particularly miRNAs between donor and targeted cells to elicit epigenetic alterations inducing functional cellular changes. These recipient acceptor cells are nearby (paracrine transfers) or far away after distribution via the circulation (endocrine transfers). The major properties of such vesicles seem to have been conserved over eons, suggesting that they may have ancient evolutionary origins arising perhaps even before cells in the primordial soup from which life evolved. Their potential ancient evolutionary attributes may be responsible for the ability of some modern-day exosomes to withstand unusually harsh conditions, perhaps due to unique membrane lipid compositions. This is exemplified by ability of the maternal milk exosomes to survive passing the neonatal acid/enzyme rich stomach. It is postulated that this resistance also applies to their durable presence in phagolysosomes, thus suggesting a unique intracellular release of their contained miRNAs. A major discussed issue is the generally poorly realized superiority of these naturally evolved nanovesicles for therapies when compared to human-engineered artificial nanoparticles, e.g., for the treatment of diseases like cancers.


Subject(s)
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Exosomes/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716407, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359193

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a new strain of coronavirus and the causative agent of the current global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). There are currently no FDA-approved antiviral drugs for COVID-19 and there is an urgent need to develop treatment strategies that can effectively suppress SARS-CoV-2 infection. Numerous approaches have been researched so far, with one of them being the emerging exosome-based therapies. Exosomes are nano-sized, lipid bilayer-enclosed structures, share structural similarities with viruses secreted from all types of cells, including those lining the respiratory tract. Importantly, the interplay between exosomes and viruses could be potentially exploited for antiviral drug and vaccine development. Exosomes are produced by virus-infected cells and play crucial roles in mediating communication between infected and uninfected cells. SARS-CoV-2 modulates the production and composition of exosomes, and can exploit exosome formation, secretion, and release pathways to promote infection, transmission, and intercellular spread. Exosomes have been exploited for therapeutic benefits in patients afflicted with various diseases including COVID-19. Furthermore, the administration of exosomes loaded with immunomodulatory cargo in combination with antiviral drugs represents a novel intervention for the treatment of diseases such as COVID-19. In particular, exosomes derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are used as cell-free therapeutic agents. Mesenchymal stem cell derived exosomes reduces the cytokine storm and reverse the inhibition of host anti-viral defenses associated with COVID-19 and also enhances mitochondrial function repair lung injuries. We discuss the role of exosomes in relation to transmission, infection, diagnosis, treatment, therapeutics, drug delivery, and vaccines, and present some future perspectives regarding their use for combating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Drug Carriers/therapeutic use , Exosomes/metabolism , Immunomodulation/immunology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/transmission , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
12.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 300, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351933

ABSTRACT

Elderly people and patients with comorbidities are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection, resulting in severe complications and high mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we investigate whether miRNAs in serum exosomes can exert antiviral functions and affect the response to COVID-19 in the elderly and people with diabetes. First, we identified four miRNAs (miR-7-5p, miR-24-3p, miR-145-5p and miR-223-3p) through high-throughput sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis, that are remarkably decreased in the elderly and diabetic groups. We further demonstrated that these miRNAs, either in the exosome or in the free form, can directly inhibit S protein expression and SARS-CoV-2 replication. Serum exosomes from young people can inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication and S protein expression, while the inhibitory effect is markedly decreased in the elderly and diabetic patients. Moreover, three out of the four circulating miRNAs are significantly increased in the serum of healthy volunteers after 8-weeks' continuous physical exercise. Serum exosomes isolated from these volunteers also showed stronger inhibitory effects on S protein expression and SARS-CoV-2 replication. Our study demonstrates for the first time that circulating exosomal miRNAs can directly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication and may provide a possible explanation for the difference in response to COVID-19 between young people and the elderly or people with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , China , Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Exercise , Exosomes/genetics , Exosomes/metabolism , Exosomes/virology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Male , MicroRNAs/blood , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Virus Replication
13.
Cells ; 10(8)2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348603

ABSTRACT

Exosomes are a type of extracellular vesicles, produced within multivesicular bodies, that are then released into the extracellular space through a merging of the multivesicular body with the plasma membrane. These vesicles are secreted by almost all cell types to aid in a vast array of cellular functions, including intercellular communication, cell differentiation and proliferation, angiogenesis, stress response, and immune signaling. This ability to contribute to several distinct processes is due to the complexity of exosomes, as they carry a multitude of signaling moieties, including proteins, lipids, cell surface receptors, enzymes, cytokines, transcription factors, and nucleic acids. The favorable biological properties of exosomes including biocompatibility, stability, low toxicity, and proficient exchange of molecular cargos make exosomes prime candidates for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Exploring the functions and molecular payloads of exosomes can facilitate tissue regeneration therapies and provide mechanistic insight into paracrine modulation of cellular activities. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of exosome biogenesis, composition, and isolation methods. We also discuss emerging healing properties of exosomes and exosomal cargos, such as microRNAs, in brain injuries, cardiovascular disease, and COVID-19 amongst others. Overall, this review highlights the burgeoning roles and potential applications of exosomes in regenerative medicine.


Subject(s)
Exosomes/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Regenerative Medicine , Animals , Exosomes/physiology , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Tissue Engineering
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346495

ABSTRACT

Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles secreted by most cells that contain a variety of biological molecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. They have been recognized as important mediators for long-distance cell-to-cell communication and are involved in a variety of biological processes. Exosomes have unique advantages, positioning them as highly effective drug delivery tools and providing a distinct means of delivering various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, as a new clinical diagnostic biomarker, exosomes play an important role in many aspects of human health and disease, including endocrinology, inflammation, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the development of exosome-based drug delivery tools and the validation of novel biomarkers, and illustrate the role of exosomes as therapeutic targets in the prevention and treatment of various diseases.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Drug Delivery Systems , Exosomes/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Pharmaceutical Preparations/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism
15.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(10): 5356-5368, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326854

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of novel coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has made global chaos for normal human living. Despite common COVID-19 symptoms, variability in clinical phenotypes was reported worldwide. Reports on SARS-CoV-2 suggest causing neurological manifestation. In addition, the susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and its complexity are largely unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the possible transport of exosome from SARS-CoV-2-infected lungs to the brain regions associated with neurodegenerative diseases using multiple transcriptome datasets of SARS-CoV-2-infected lungs, RNA profiles from lung exosome, and gene expression profiles of the human brain. Upon transport, the transcription factors localized in the exosome regulate genes at lateral substantia nigra, medial substantia nigra, and superior frontal gyrus regions of Parkinson's disease (PD) and frontal cortex, hippocampus, and temporal cortex of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On SARS-CoV-2 infection, BCL3, JUND, MXD1, IRF2, IRF9, and STAT1 transcription factors in the exosomes influence the neuronal gene regulatory network and accelerate neurodegeneration. STAT1 transcription factor regulates 64 PD genes at lateral substantia nigra, 65 at superior frontal gyrus, and 19 at medial substantia nigra. Similarly, in AD, STAT1 regulates 74 AD genes at the temporal cortex, 40 genes at the hippocampus, and 16 genes at the frontal cortex. We further demonstrate that dysregulated neuronal genes showed involvement in immune response, signal transduction, apoptosis, and stress response process. In conclusion, SARS-CoV-2 may dysregulate neuronal gene regulatory network through exosomes that attenuate disease severity of neurodegeneration.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Exosomes/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Neurons/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/genetics , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Databases, Factual , Exosomes/genetics , Humans , Parkinson Disease/genetics , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , Transcriptome
16.
Arch Virol ; 166(10): 2649-2672, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316285

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). To date, there is no effective therapeutic approach for treating SARS-CoV-2 infections. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognized to target the viral genome directly or indirectly, thereby inhibiting viral replication. Several studies have demonstrated that host miRNAs target different sites in SARS-CoV-2 RNA and constrain the production of essential viral proteins. Furthermore, miRNAs have lower toxicity, are more immunogenic, and are more diverse than protein-based and even plasmid-DNA-based therapeutic agents. In this review, we emphasize the role of miRNAs in viral infection and their potential use as therapeutic agents against COVID-19 disease. The potential of novel miRNA delivery strategies, especially EDV™ nanocells, for targeting lung tissue for treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , MicroRNAs/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Drug Delivery Systems , Drug Design , Exosomes/metabolism , Genome, Viral , Humans , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288907

ABSTRACT

Eosinophils are complex granulocytes with the capacity to react upon diverse stimuli due to their numerous and variable surface receptors, which allows them to respond in very different manners. Traditionally believed to be only part of parasitic and allergic/asthmatic immune responses, as scientific studies arise, the paradigm about these cells is continuously changing, adding layers of complexity to their roles in homeostasis and disease. Developing principally in the bone marrow by the action of IL-5 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor GM-CSF, eosinophils migrate from the blood to very different organs, performing multiple functions in tissue homeostasis as in the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, uterus, mammary glands, liver, and skeletal muscle. In organs such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract, eosinophils are able to act as immune regulatory cells and also to perform direct actions against parasites, and bacteria, where novel mechanisms of immune defense as extracellular DNA traps are key factors. Besides, eosinophils, are of importance in an effective response against viral pathogens by their nuclease enzymatic activity and have been lately described as involved in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 immunity. The pleiotropic role of eosinophils is sustained because eosinophils can be also detrimental to human physiology, for example, in diseases like allergies, asthma, and eosinophilic esophagitis, where exosomes can be significant pathophysiologic units. These eosinophilic pathologies, require specific treatments by eosinophils control, such as new monoclonal antibodies like mepolizumab, reslizumab, and benralizumab. In this review, we describe the roles of eosinophils as effectors and regulatory cells and their involvement in pathological disorders and treatment.


Subject(s)
Eosinophils/physiology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/drug therapy , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/immunology , Eosinophilic Esophagitis/pathology , Eosinophils/cytology , Eosinophils/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Humans , Plasma Cells/cytology , Plasma Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 659621, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285289

ABSTRACT

Methods for suppressing the host immune system over the long term and improving transplantation tolerance remain a primary issue in organ transplantation. Cell therapy is an emerging therapeutic strategy for immunomodulation after transplantation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells with wide differentiation potential and immunosuppressive properties, which are mostly used in regenerative medicine and immunomodulation. In addition, emerging research suggests that MSC-derived exosomes have the same therapeutic effects as MSCs in many diseases, while avoiding many of the risks associated with cell transplantation. Their unique immunomodulatory properties are particularly important in the immune system-overactive graft environment. In this paper, we review the effects of MSC-derived exosomes in the immune regulation mechanism after organ transplantation and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) from various perspectives, including immunosuppression, influencing factors, anti-inflammatory properties, mediation of tissue repair and regeneration, and the induction of immune tolerance. At present, the great potential of MSC-derived exosomes in immunotherapy has attracted a great deal of attention. Furthermore, we discuss the latest insights on MSC-derived exosomes in organ transplantation and GvHD, especially its commercial production concepts, which aim to provide new strategies for improving the prognosis of organ transplantation patients.


Subject(s)
Exosomes/immunology , Immunomodulation/immunology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Organ Transplantation/methods , Transplantation Tolerance/immunology , Adult , Exosomes/metabolism , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Regenerative Medicine/methods
19.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282641

ABSTRACT

This article reviews the current knowledge on how viruses may utilize Extracellular Vesicle Assisted Inflammatory Load (EVAIL) to exert pathologic activities. Viruses are classically considered to exert their pathologic actions through acute or chronic infection followed by the host response. This host response causes the release of cytokines leading to vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. However, viruses may employ an alternative pathway to soluble cytokine-induced pathologies-by initiating the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes. The best-understood example of this alternative pathway is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-elicited EVs and their propensity to harm vascular endothelial cells. Specifically, an HIV-encoded accessory protein called the "negative factor" (Nef) was demonstrated in EVs from the body fluids of HIV patients on successful combined antiretroviral therapy (ART); it was also demonstrated to be sufficient in inducing endothelial and cardiovascular dysfunction. This review will highlight HIV-Nef as an example of how HIV can produce EVs loaded with proinflammatory cargo to disseminate cardiovascular pathologies. It will further discuss whether EV production can explain SARS-CoV-2-mediated pulmonary and cardiovascular pathologies.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/immunology , Extracellular Vesicles/virology , Inflammation/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Exosomes/metabolism , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV Infections/physiopathology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
20.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
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